Reports from Frieze Fair Week London 2013

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Dr Michael Petry

Artist, curator and author, director of MOCA London

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11

Frieze Week, London

Posted: 14/10/2013 23:17

In the total art madness that is Frieze week I have decided to try to post works and people of interest through out the week. Oddly it really started last week for many London galleries as they attempted to beat the rush of overlapping private views that occur this Monday to Friday. The show I would single out from last week was James White’s exhibition at the Max Wigram Gallery.

But on to the official week

Day 1

Jeff Elrod at the Simon Lee Gallery (15 October – 23 November 2013)

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Jeff Elrod and his work at the opening

Kehinde Wiley, The World Stage: Jamaica at the Stephen Friedman Gallery (15 October – 16 November, 2013)

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Wiley talking about his work (video still)

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Detail of a Wiley painting

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Artist Ajamu X at the opening

Gayzed, The Annual Gay Photographers Network exhibition, Strand Gallery, (15 – 20 October, 2013)

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James Barrett with his portrait of the photographer Jay Morthland

Other Fairs this week:

Multiplied Art Fair 2013 at Christie’s (18 -20 October)

Sluice Art Fair (19 -20 October)

The Other Art Fair (17 -20 October)

The Independent Artist Fair (16 – 20 October)

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Dr Michael Petry

Artist, curator and author, director of MOCA London

London Day 2

Posted: 16/10/2013 09:24
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 Day 2 in London saw the start of a huge number of private galleries launching shows for the major fall season. Brand leader Gagosian Gallery had a massive group show of blue chip artists called The Show is Over, and White Cube went with Mark Bradford at their museum-like Bermondsey space.

Blain Southern had one of the most stylish shows called CANDY featuring the work of Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Damian Hirst

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Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled, 1992, artists Maciej Urbanek and Mathias Vef
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2013 Turner Prize finalist Lynette Yiadom-Boakye (right), and picking candy

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Jennifer Mc Sweeney and Vanessa Arelle, Head of Cultural Affairs, Mexican Embassy

At Other Criteria artists Tim Noble & Sue Webster launched a multiple edition of 10 bronze casts of their “nipples and assholes” called Portraits from the Bottom Up.

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Tim Noble

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Portraits from the Bottom Up, Tim Noble & Sue Webster

At the MOT International gallery they gave German artist Ulay a mini retrospective

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Ulay in the 1970s and in the gallery
And finally at Stuart Shave/Modern Art, they went with a solo show of the British painter Nigel Cooke

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Kirk McInroy, Modern Art, Director and Gavin Delahunty, Head of Exhibitions & Displays, Tate Liverpool

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Dr Michael Petry

Artist, curator and author, director of MOCA London

Frieze: Day 3

Posted: 17/10/2013 14:33

The opening of the Frieze art fair was in a much improved tent this year. The ceiling was higher and the aisles wider so that the whole thing felt a lot better, not so crowded and easier to view the work. The following images are of pieces that took my fancy and are in no order of preference or even when I came across them at the fair.2013-10-17-da.jpg

Doug Aitken, You/You, 2012, wood, mirror and glass

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Wolfgang Tillmans, Karl Marseille II, 2013, inkjet print

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Elad Lassry, Untitled (Man, Strainer), 2013, C-print, walnut frame, 4 ply silk

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Elmsgreen & Dragset, Tomorrow, marble and earth

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Elmsgreen & Dragset, He, 2013, epoxy resin, silver coating, lacquer

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John Giorno, WE GAVE A PARTY FOR THE GODS AND THE GODS ALL CAME, 2009, graphite on paper

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Angela De la Cruz, Roll (Green/Ochre), 2013, oil, acrylic on canvas

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John Currin, Rosebush, 2003, oil on canvas

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Mark Flood, Orange Diamond Mute 2, 2013, acrylic on painted Coroplast sign

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Tania Bruguera, Plusvalia, 2010, installation

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Marcus Coates, Ritual for Reconciliation: Golden Silk Orb-Weaver Spider (Genus Nephila) USA, 2013, pigment print on rice paper

All the images were taken on my handy mobile phone

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Dr Michael Petry

Artist, curator and author, director of MOCA London

GET UPDATES FROM Dr Michael Petry

Day 4: The Aftermath

Posted: 19/10/2013 10:24

And now for something completely different. Thursday night in London was the West End Night with most of the contemporary galleries staying open for all those visiting London to have a look after a long day at any one of the fairs.

But it was also the opening of a completely different type of show called Big Deal No 5, a massive group show (over 100 artists) in a central London underground car par (Cavendish Square). The show was organised by Geoffrey Leong and curated by artists Vanya Balogh and Cedric Christie and looked vastly different from other events on offer in London.

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Martin Sexton, Spectre of Marx

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Rebecca Scott, No-one gets abused in the bed of human rights

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Amy Sharrocks, Rolling Umbrellas

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Danny Pockets, Kebabs & Chicken

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Demelza Louise Moreau, The push and pull of the gaze

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Mark Woods, The Unchanging Nature of the Fetish Object

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Roger Clarke, Red Knob

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Nicola Hicks, Profit is God

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Roberto Ekholm, Untitled (O wave)

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Sophie Dickens, Landscape

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Karolin Schwab, three places

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Perry Roberts, Nobody knows what I really think

Big Deal No 5
Cavendish Square car par lower level 3
18 – 20 October
11am – 7:30 PM
FREE

Dr Michael Petry

Artist, curator and author, director of MOCA London

Day 5: Sluice Alternative

Posted: 20/10/2013 11:52

Sluice art fair is completely different from the usual clean white visual aesthetic of modern art fairs, where sales are paramount and visual clutter to be avoided. Sluice goes for odd spaces and mainly artist run galleries and there is a wild performative aspect to the fair. For 2013 it is in an old factory space that reminds me of former times in New York, London and Berlin, when the have a go spirit saw artists flock to Alphabet City, Hoxton and the Former East all now transformed to chic places to shop (if not live – well maybe the grandchildren can for a few years).The following images are my pick of the fair.
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Rob Leech, (A touch of ) Instant Tan, 2012, printed self-adhesive vinyl (the colour taken directly from an image of Amy Childs)

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Gary Petersen, Untitled S, 2012, acrylic & oil on panel, Theodore:Art, Brooklyn

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Sam Curtis, Centre for Innovative and Radical Fishmongery, performance installation at Division of Labour, Malvern

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Esther Planas, performance installation, Five Years gallery, London

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Joshua Raffell, installation at Studio 1.1, London

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Sarah Doyle, Falling in Love With Greta Garbo, 2013, watercolour paintings & looped annimation

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Chris Hawtin, painting and sculpture installation at C&C Gallery, London

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Philip Newcombe, Hooligan, 2013, installed polished aluminium football stud at Fort gallery, London

And perhaps my own personal favourite was Dave EvansArtist’s Car Bumper Stickers part of the TOOOLS shop “of items to assist your navigation of art fairs worldwide” at Liverpool’s The Royal Standard gallery.
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The Art of Not Making: The New Artist/Artisan Relationship

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ART IN AMERICA
Previews Oct. 17, 2013

Frieze London: Welcome to Art History, Level One

by Iphgenia Baal

Gagosian Gallery’s booth at Frieze, featuring sculptures by Jeff Koons.

One of the last preparations before doors open to the Frieze art fair tonight is the installation of Richard Long’s mud painting at London’s Lisson Gallery. The mud is applied directly to the wall, and the floor needs to be covered with a protective sheet. When the work is finished, there is a clean black line along the bottom of the wall that draws the eye. In an environment where everything is slick, the work stands out as a refreshing example of healthy earthiness.

Now in its 11th year, Frieze London 2013 (Oct. 17-20) hosts some 170 exhibitors (up from last year’s 120), attesting to the fair’s status in the global art market. Exhibitors represent 34 countries, making this year, according to the organizers, the fair’s most international outing yet.

Countless satellite fairs like Moving Image and (new this year) Strarta have sprung up, and London galleries schedule exhibitions of their biggest hitters to coincide with the fair’s opening; see Tim Noble and Sue Webster at Blain Southern. At the preview, all the familiar faces from the art establishment were present: museum directors like Nicholas Penny (National Gallery), Ralph Rugoff (Hayward) and Nicholas Serota (Tate), as are artists like Grayson Perry, Anish Kapoor and Martin Creed.

If Frieze truly is nothing more than a temple of consumerism at its most devout, then the altarpiece is Jeff Koons’s bronze megaliths of lobsters, kittens and candies, showing at Gagosian Gallery. The rumored $10 million price tag (which the gallery declined to confirm) reinforces the notion that cash is king. Yet only a booth away, at Berlin’s Esther Schipper, Pierre Huyghe’s aquarium works house horseshoe and arrow crabs—this living ecosystem is utterly unconcerned with cash flow. Even if his aquarium pieces do come with a price tag of $165,000 each and a life span of 15 years, here “prehistoric life forms that pre-date all this,” as a gallery representative describes it, are top of the food chain.

Still, the chief traffic is buyers. Dealers in the Frame section, reserved for 18 galleries founded post-2003 (16 of whom are Frieze first-timers) all told A.i.A. that sales were good. There are some lively examples here, like Berlin-based artist Ryan Siegan-Smith’s works concerning memory and mnemonic techniques in a mixture of video, installation and drawing at Malmö’s Johan Berggren. Seemingly everyone’s favorite were Marlie Mul’s sand and resin puddles at Milan’s Fluxia, for about $5,500.

In the main exhibitors section, Laura Bartlett is returning for her fifth year with a sampler of artists including Cyprien Galliard, Nina Beir, Ian Law and Allison Katz. “Art fairs are where the relationship between gallerist and artist is both least and most romantic,” the London dealer told A.i.A., “but underlying everything is the same yearning, seeking out treasure.”

No one is forthcoming about what they are selling, for how much and to whom, but A.i.A. did overhear one dealer comparing shopping styles. “The Europeans walk round for days writing notes, then do all their buying on the Sunday. If the Americans want it, they buy on the spot.” One pair of arty spectacles with a New York City rasp dropped $80,000 on two Warhol drawings at New York’s Cheim & Read with the comment, “I just came off my medication this morning!”

On the whole, the air is less frenzied than past years. Air kisses have given way to a more serious crowd. Combined tickets to Frieze and Frieze Masters are $80 this year, so it is less about networking and more about cold, hard currency. “The market has matured,” an English collector told A.i.A., “and people are here to do business.”

That includes the crowd at Frieze Masters. Now in its second year, Frieze Masters provides a greatest hits of everything up until 2000. If modern art has been knocked off its perch by the growing strength of the contemporary market in recent years, then Frieze Masters addresses that balance. Dealers bring out prestige works of Japanese Gutai and Russian Constructivism, with 12 galleries focusing on Brazilian modernism.

Most galleries at Frieze Masters are returning exhibitors, but some pulled out, deciding to concentrate on the main fair and its reputation for guaranteed sales. “We did both fairs last year, and did well at Frieze but we didn’t make any money here” at Frieze Masters, Elliott MacDonald, representing Pace, told A.i.A. “But when you don’t do a fair, you always have the sneaking suspicion you are missing out.”

MacDonald’s suspicions may be right. Walking into Cheim & Read, one of the dealers says loudly on speakerphone, “I can’t tell you exactly what but a very nice thing happened today.” One museum director (who wished to be unnamed) put a reserve on the entire exhibition documenting artist Rose English’s feminist dressage performances at London’s Karsten Schubert.

There are no bargains at Frieze Masters. Sam Fogg, a London specialist in medieval art, has maybe the most beautiful object in the entire fair: an illuminated manuscript from the Book of Kings, selling for $8 million. New York-based Hans P. Kraus Jr. has a Julia Margaret Cameron album for about $7 million; portrait subjects include Darwin and Tennyson. Then there is The Census at Bethlehem by Brueghel the Elder, which hasn’t been on the market since it was bought directly from the studio 400 years ago by an English family who has kept it in Kenya in recent years.

Frieze Masters contextualizes Frieze London in a way the organizers probably never intended. It backs up contemporary works as often as it tears them down. Korean artist Kyungah Ham is showing an embroidered canvas at Kukje Gallery (Seoul), a clear homage to Alighiero Boetti (showing at London’s Dickinson as part of Frieze Masters). But when quizzed, the exhibitor told A.i.A., “No. Not like Boetti. Original.” On the flip side, the three Michelangelo Pistoletto works on sale by different galleries at Frieze Masters are called out by Gavin Turk’s Pistoletto’s Waste (2013) at Vienna’s Galerie Krinzinger at Frieze London. Turk’s work mimics the originals’ mirrored stainless steel, but replaces the boy and dog pictured in Pistoletto’s series with an image of black trash can liners.

Where inclusion in Frieze once meant you had made it, Frieze Masters makes the main fair look increasingly like level one in a long-drawn-out strategy game, with the question now being: How many of the works showing at Frieze London will make it into Frieze Masters in 10 years’ time?

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Galerie Gmurzynska participates in Frieze Masters London 2013

Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965) was an architect, exhibition designer and artist responsible for changing standard notions of how we display art. Kiesler is most well known for his designs for Peggy Guggenheim’s museum-gallery, Art of this Century (1942–1947), as well as his influential designs for important Surrealist exhibitions including ‘Bloodflames 1947.’

Curated by noted art critic Nicolas Calas, ‘Bloodflames 1947’ was a major avant-garde and the last exhibition of the Surrealist group in New York held at the Hugo Gallery, and heavily focused on the work of Wifredo Lam. 

Galerie Gmurzynska is pleased to announce a retrospective exhibition of historic proportions by Wifredo Lam at Frieze Masters, London installed in an environment based on designs by Kiesler. The exhibition is a career spanning survey of Lam’s groundbreaking oeuvre.

Lam was a vital part of Guggenheim’s legendary collection and Kiesler’s design for her Surrealist gallery is considered one of the cornerstones of mid-20th century art. Galerie Gmurzynska will present Lam’s work on similar iconic floating curved walls inspired by Kiesler’s designs.

The main focus of ‘Bloodflames 1947’ was a curtained area where one could recline and contemplate a work by Lam, which was hung on the ceiling. Galerie Gmurzynska will recreate this curtained area with Kiesler furnishings at Frieze Masters presentation.

This is the first time that these designs have been recreated. 

Wifredo Lam (1902–1982) was a central figure of twentieth century art. He integrated himself into every major artistic circle and movement of much of the twentieth century. He greatly inspired Picasso, was a member of the Surrealist movement and also explored alternatives to the abstract expressionism of the 1950’s. Lam participated in the most important international exhibitions of his time such as “documenta” II and III in Kassel, Germany and the Venice Biennale in 1972.

The exhibition was organized by Galerie Gmurzynska in cooperation with the Estate of Wifredo Lam and the Austrian Frederick and Lillian Kiesler Private Foundation, Vienna.

Galerie Gmurzynska represents the Estate of Wifredo Lam worldwide.

A portfolio on the ‘Bloodflames 1947’ exhibition will be published by Galerie Gmurzynska on the occasion of this exhibition, featuring documentary images, articles and texts showing the important contemporary reaction to this exhibition and the influence of Wifredo Lam’s work on its continued influence.

A major monograph will also be published, it will be extensively illustrated with documentary images, many never before published.

Galerie Gmurzynska at Frieze Masters, Stand B7

Photos by Will Amlot/Galerie Gmurzynska
 

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TIME MAGAZINE

Reporting from Frieze: Eight Exciting Discoveries at the Contemporary Art Fair

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I really wasn’t sure what to expect this year of Frieze, one of the world’s leading contemporary art fairs, which takes place every October in Regents Park, London. At its inception ten years ago, the fair was a vibrant, colorful event, with lots of artists milling around – both emerging and established – as well as curators, gallery owners, collectors and art lovers. But over the years, the ticket price has increased to the point where some artists now feel reluctant to pay the entrance fee for something that, as one journalist put it, “is basically an art supermarket.”

Upon entering the temporary structure built by architects Carmody Groarke, and walking into the first of many gallery booths, I realized that, if this is a supermarket, it’s a high-end model.

In fact, I was so impressed by most of the art on display that I made a call to a reluctant artist friend and said, “Even if it means you’re eating nothing but beans tomorrow, come have a look.” After three days of full immersion, I attempted to select my eight favorite photographs. In no particular order, they are:

1) Tacita Dean, The Book End of Time, 2013, Frith Street Gallery

There is poetry in the frailty of this object, as if one gust of wind could shatter the book into a galaxy of crystal splinters. According to the gallerist, Tacita Dean immersed J.G. Ballard’s 1960 story “The Voices of Time” in a stream, on a salt plane in Utah, for several weeks to get this effect. The artist then used photography to document the outcome of her experiment, as the book was too fragile to move. To me, the book appears like a physical manifestation of the death of the printed page, made all the more apparent by gallery owners preferring to show artists’ work on iPads rather than with the help of a catalogue raisonné.

Tacita Dean—Courtesy of Frith Street Gallery

Tacita Dean—Courtesy of Frith Street Gallery

The Book End of Time, 2013

2) Thomas Ruff, photograms, 2013, Konrad Fischer Galerie

“What exactly is going on here?” I wondered as I stood in front of the large-scale Thomas Ruff photographs. I have to say, even after the kind gallery assistant explained Ruff’s working practice to me for this series, I remained slightly confused as to how exactly a virtual darkroom was used to create this photographic magic. Nevertheless, it left me entranced.

Thomas Ruff—Courtesy of Konrad Fischer Galerie

Thomas Ruff—Courtesy of Konrad Fischer Galerie

r.phg.s.06, 2012

3) Wolfgang Tillmans, Karl Marseille II, 2013, Juana de Aizpuru

After lots of conceptual art, it’s quite refreshing to stand staring straight into a man’s crotch. Greying sports socks on train-seat fabric has never been the most arousing of combinations but Tillmans certainly tickled my feathers with Karl Marseille II.

Wolfgang Tillmans—Courtesy of Galeria Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid

Wolfgang Tillmans—Courtesy of Galeria Juana de Aizpuru, Madrid

Karl Marseille II, 2013

4)  Koji Enokura, Symptom-Lump of Lead to the Sky I, 1972, Takaishii Gallery

I admit I knew nothing about the Japanese artist Enokura before seeing this photograph, but it stopped me in my tracks. The graphic elements of the image — the criss-crossing lines of the square paving stones, the vertical lines of the wall and the darker and lighter elements of the photograph — really enticed me, as well as the fact that it left me wondering, How is this lump airborne just so?

Koji Enokura—Courtesy of Taka Ishii Gallery

Koji Enokura—Courtesy of Taka Ishii Gallery

Symptom-Lump of Lead to the Sky Ⅰ (P.W.-No.41), 1972

5) Raphael Hefti, Lycopodium series, 2012, Ancient & Modern

The Swiss artist Hefti creates his photograms using photo-sensitive paper in a pitch-black underground storage facility. A modern-day alchemist, Hefti then lights the spores of the flammable plant “witches moss,” thereby achieving “color explosions” with enchanting hues.

Raphael Hefti—Courtesy of Ancient and Modern

Raphael Hefti—Courtesy of Ancient and Modern

Two works from the Lycopodium series, 2012

6) Anne Collier, Negative (California), 2013, Marc Foxx

According to the gallery, the photograph is a reconsideration of earlier source material from Collier’s archive. Its life-size print is alluring, drawing the viewer into the scene. The silvery sea looks like mercury or even mountain snow, adding a sense of mystery and suspense to the image. Will I drown if I follow her in?

Anne Collier—Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles

Anne Collier—Courtesy of Marc Foxx Gallery, Los Angeles

Negative (California), 2013

7) Shimabuku, Gift: An exhibition for monkeys, 1992, Wilkinson Gallery

Tucked away in the far end of one of Frieze’s long aisles was the Wilkinson Gallery. Having assessed the contents of countless booths, I felt by this stage that Shimabuku had not only created a gift for the monkeys with this image, but a gift for me, too.

Shimabuku—Courtesy of Wilkinson Gallery

Shimabuku—Courtesy of Wilkinson Gallery

Gift: Exhibition for the Monkeys, 1992

8) Akram Zaatari, 60 Men Crossing Ain El Helweh Bridge, 2007, Sfeir Semler Gallery

 This is a collection of exceptional black and white images from the Hashem El Madani Archive. Hashem El Madani was a photographer working in Saida, Lebanon, between the late 1940s and ’70s. His archive is maintained by the Arab Image Foundation, of which the artist Akram Zaatari is a founding member. In these images we see men, young and old, crossing Ain El Helweh Bridge in their suits, on bikes, laughing, chatting, some walking leisurely, others in a rush. The bridge and its characters have come alive all over again, thanks to Zaatari’s fabulous archival work.

Akram Zaatari—Courtesy of Gallery Sfeir-Semler, Beirut-Hamburg

Akram Zaatari—Courtesy of Gallery Sfeir-Semler, Beirut-Hamburg

Sixty young men posing while crossing the Ain el Helweh bridge, 2007
The 36 photographs were made by Hashem el Madani in Saida, Lebanon, early 1950s. Each here measures 22 x 15 cm.


Anne-Celine Jaeger is the author of Image Makers, Image Takers, published by Thames & Hudson. She previously wrote for LightBox about Jean-François Leroy.


Read more: http://lightbox.time.com/2013/10/23/reporting-from-frieze-eight-exciting-discoveries-at-the-contemporary-art-fair/#ixzz2icOF7HRf

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FINANCIAL TIMES LONDON

October 17, 2013 7:26 pm

Frieze London: report

By Jackie Wullschlager

An unlikely star emerges from among variable new work at Frieze London
'Groovy Spiral' by Dan Graham at Frieze London©Lisson Gallery’Groovy Spiral’ by Dan Graham at Frieze London

The first conversation I overheard at Frieze London was an American collector suggesting to her husband that they buy Dan Graham’s glamorously minimalist seven-metre curving glass and mirror sculpture “Groovy Spiral” as an alternative hallway for their latest home.

In fact, “Groovy Spiral” at Lisson Gallery is the fair’s most democratic, inclusive work – despite its $600,000 price tag. Framed in steel, it resembles from the outside a three-dimensional question-mark, or perhaps semi-colon, momentarily punctuating the rush and crush of too many people, pictures, prices. Walk inside, and its mirrored surfaces dizzyingly blur, mute and distance you from the crowds, who are reflected on a long white wall opposite as a frieze of pale shadows.

 This is Frieze in microcosm: a glassy, self-referential world all its own. Jeff Koons became a record-breaking market presence by sculpting banal, kitsch objects glorifying another alternative reality, Disney-like and infantilised; Gagosian has literally raised the roof of Frieze’s tent to showcase his giant hanging sculptures “Sacred Heart” – a stainless steel blue balloon tied with a pink ribbon – “Lobster” and the aluminium/rubber “Titi Tyre” modelled on children’s inflatable ducks. I loathe Koons, but as a statement of his role in conceptual sculpture’s history, Gagosian’s display is unassailable.

If all its booths were like Lisson’s and Gagosian’s – clear, decisive, committed – Frieze would be pure provocative pleasure. Certainly structural changes made to echo the sober elegance of last year’s Frieze Masters have benefited this fair: wider aisles, softer lighting, fewer exhibitors. But among the galleries themselves, too many have responded to Masters’ cut-off date of 2000 by assuming in contrast an unconsidered contemporaneity: haphazard, provisional hangs; slick, unoriginal work, much of it dated 2013.

Even at big-name spaces, some market-stall juxtapositions are so discordant that pieces argue each other out of existence. Alex Katz’s 34 small studies, landscapes and flower paintings, marvellously abbreviated dramas of light, shade and time (more than half of them sold by yesterday), struggle amid the surrounding installation of Rob Pruitt’s “Safety Cones” jokily adorned with sunglasses, smiley faces and hats at Gavin Brown’s enterprise. Affectingly wan and melancholy, Ron Mueck’s diminutive hyper-realist “Woman with Shopping”, looking as if she is about to stride out of Hauser & Wirth’s stand, is not helped by the backcloth of a massive, violent Paul McCarthy painting (already sold to a European collection for £750,000).

The best displays, aping Frieze Masters, are intensely curated and concentrated. Pace’s exploration of global portraiture is outstanding. It includes Romanian wunderkind Adrian Ghenie’s painterly depictions of epoch-changing figures – “Charles Darwin”; a scrawled-over face of Hitler in which paint seeks revenge on history – in dialogue with both Hiroshi Sugimoto’s uncanny photographs such as “Lenin”, modelled on a waxwork, and Li Songsong’s “Marshal”, a historical painting built up in impasto brushwork on panels roughly stuck together, disjointedly overlapping, so that the image never coheres. These in turn relate to the grid-patterned self-portraits with which Chuck Close questions realism and abstraction.

Saleable, accessible painting of wildly varying quality dominates the fair: highlights among new works are a free cascading landscape by Hurvin Anderson (sold by Thomas Dane in the fair’s first half hour for £130,000), a Jules de Balincourt cityscape (Victoria Miro), Chris Ofili’s monumental black figures playing out classical myth (David Zwirner, sold on the first day for $500,000).

Sculptural presentations tend to be more radical. Stuart Shave’s Modern Art intriguingly groups artists who test the limits of informality and non-traditional materials within a rigorously abstracting, post-minimal aesthetic: Karla Black’s foil and nail varnish “Living Conditions”, Eva Rothschild’s steel and lacquer “Hansel and Gretel”, Bojan Sarcevic’s burning candle on onyx “Tridiminished”, the mix of charcoal drawings with plaster and fibreglass in Matthew Monahan’s gently Gothic column “A Certain Time of You”.

Argentinian sculptor Adrián Villar Rojas was all but unheard of in London until his theatrical exhibition, focused on a charging elephant, opened last month at the new Serpentine Sackler Gallery. At Marion Goodman and Kurimanzutto he balances this figurative work by more abstract clay and concrete pieces, at once strong and fragile-looking, surfaces gnarled and cracked, which seem to belong to a fossilised jungle (the large looping, circular piece at Marion Goodman is called “Innocence of Animals”). Rare, delicately inky works on paper evoke ruined cityscapes. A sort of visual descendant of Borges and García Marquez, Villar Rojas drowns out the hype and sales pitches here with a vibrant magical realism making him the un-
expected, very popular star of Frieze 2013.

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FINANCIAL TIMES LONDON

PAD London – report

By Caroline Roux

This user-friendly fair joyfully mixes decorative arts and design with fine art
Thomas Lemut armchair from FumiThomas Lemut armchair from Fumi

If visitors to the Pavilion of Art and Design (PAD), which takes place in a Mayfair marquee during Frieze week, are in any doubt as to what to do with their high design purchases when they get them home, Timothy Jeffries has the answer. Jeffries, the director of photography specialists Hamiltons Gallery, has kitted out his booth at the fair as a Belgravia sitting room – all velvety brown walls and classy Irving Penn photographs. But then, with a nod to more decadent tastes, he has furnished a dimly lit back room with black brick walls and Araki imagery of complicated bondage techniques, where trussed-up women gazed balefully down onto a black leather Mies van der Rohe daybed. A large-scale Richard Avedon is hung at the perfect height to allow contemplation of 1990s supermodel Stephanie Seymour’s carefully topiaried pubic hair.

The booth’s design is more sad than erotic, suggesting a world in which sex is more likely a transaction than a pleasure. And it isn’t representative of a fair whose annual mission is joyfully to mix 20th-century and contemporary decorative arts and design with fine art in a “do try this at home” kind of way (assuming your home is an airy apartment in the 7th arrondissement, or a duplex on the Upper East Side).

 Dealers love the London edition of PAD, a Parisian product that’s now onto its seventh year in the UK. With just 60 galleries, largely of European and US origin (though this year SMOGallery from Beirut joined in), it attracts the high rollers who are in town for Frieze Week.

If Frieze Masters is about connoisseurship and Frieze London about the highly competitive collecting of the contemporary art world, PAD is about comfort and shopping, and the booths are organised accordingly. At Stockholm gallery, Modernity, a pair of Alvar Aalto gleaming black Paimio chairs sit on a stunning rug by Marta Maas Fjetterstrom (an underrated designer of the 1920s and 1930s, though this carpet was posthumously made in the 1950s).

At the Downtown, from Paris, a serious sofa and chairs by Jean Royère, created for a Paris apartment in the 1960s, are shown off against a cream rug, while a stunning Royère lighting arrangement (“Liane”), of seven white shades on meandering black stalks, creeps up an adjoining wall.

London art dealer Robin Katz, a tub-thumper for 1960s and 1970s British artists including Bridget Riley and neglected talents such as Bob Law (“I feel quite patriotic about bringing this work back to people’s attention,” Katz said), has furnished his stall with a Nakashima coffee table and a “school of Rietveld” chair. “The furniture’s not for sale,” he said. “I just like being an interior decorator for a week.”

The New York gallery Van de Weghe adjusted its set economically too, showing a suite of recent Ross Bleckner paintings at around $100,000. The same gallery is showing Picasso’s “Nue Allongée” (1968) on its Frieze Masters stand at $8m.

The PAD formula certainly works. On the opening night alone, sales were ridiculously brisk. Fumi was relieved of a Rowan Mersh shell sculpture and a jesmonite table by Studio Portable within minutes. A brilliant green table by Marc Newson (at €300,000) was snapped up from Galerie Kreo, Paris’s most sophisticated design gallery, along with vintage Gio Ponti mirrors and work by the Campana Brothers. A sleek, masculine carbon fibre shelving piece by Pierre Charpin was under consideration by several buyers. “This really is a commercial fair,” said Clemence Krentowski, the elegant Alaia-clad co-director of Kreo. “The user is at the centre of all this work. Sure, it’s nice if there’s a story behind the piece, but this,” she pointed to the Charpin, “is still a shelf. Otherwise, we’d be at Frieze.”

Not that useability is always the goal. An unlikely new arrival at the fair is the Paris-based Jean-Christophe Charbonnier, specialist in 17th- to 19th-century Japanese armour. Glossy helmets in iron and lacquer sell for £24,000-£60,000 and are proving to have crossover appeal with design-oriented buyers seduced by their sculptural form and exquisite execution.

Next spring, PAD will make its first foray to Los Angeles, and Gregory Gatseralia of SMOGallery has already signed up. “I’m excited about it,” he said. “I’m waiting for Brad Pitt to come along and buy something.” If LA is anything like London, the chances are reasonably high.

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Jeff Koon’s Tweekie Pie
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FINANCIAL TIMES LONDON

Frieze Masters, Regent’s Park, London – report

By Jackie Wullschlager

The fair’s second edition encapsulates 21st-century shifts in taste and taste-making
Monet’s ‘L’église de Varengeville; soleil couchant’ (detail) (1882), unseen for more than a century, is at DickinsonMonet’s ‘L’église de Varengeville; soleil couchant’ (detail) (1882), unseen for more than a century, is at Dickinson

Who needs museums with walls when a pop-up version in a Regent’s Park tent makes art look fresher, brighter and more surprising than it does in any public institution?

Unrivalled among fairs worldwide for its quality, range, seductive displays and scholarly interest, Frieze Masters is an emblem of 21st-century shifts in power, as private galleries rather than museums increasingly determine currents of taste, how we experience art, and historical interpretations of it.

The fair has grown up since last year’s launch. The jumble of top-class works from ancient times to 2000 still delights: a small pink-hued Tang dynasty “Pottery Figure of a Court Lady” at Ben Jannssens, a gorgeous off-kilter Cézanne cupid at Acquavella, and Lisson’s theatrically recreated Richard Long walking piece are formally and emotionally arresting highlights. But the overall feel is more serious, less showy, with many galleries attempting to dig deeper, stake significant positions and juxtapose old and new in revealing not gimmicky ways – Jackson Pollock’s early drawings alongside the tribal masks that inspired them at Washburn Gallery and Donald Ellis; Leon Kossoff’s tensely wrought charcoal/oil versions of Old Master suffering (Titian’s “Flaying of Marsyas”, Rembrandt’s “Blinding of Samson”) at Mitchell Innes Nash.

Last year’s high standards have provoked competition to boast trophy pieces, including Monet’s scintillating “L’église de Varengeville, soleil couchant”, from a French private collection, unseen for more than a century, at Dickinson, and Modigliani’s elongated, melancholy “Bride and Groom”, one of only two double portraits the artists ever made, deaccessioned from New York’s Museum of Modern Art and on offer at Landau. Both galleries are new to Frieze, and Robert Landau’s often important works do not reach public eyes as he neither sells nor lends to museums (“they take too long to make up their mind and send 17 committee members to have a look”). Along with an unusual Fauvish Chagall “Still Life” (1911-14) and a rare 1905 Derain “Collioure”, Landau has the monumental, transitional “The Sleepers” (1965), favourite of Picasso’s dealer Daniel-Henri Kahnweiler – it hung above his desk until his death.

The subject, a naked woman and a black-suited gentleman reclining on the grass, reprises the “Déjeuner sur l’herbe” series but bold facture and slangy language inaugurate Picasso’s late style. The flattened forms and disruptive contrast of curves and angles merging the two bodies were inspired by Japanese erotic prints – such as the elegantly explicit 17th-century woodblock “Scenes of Lovemaking” by Sugimura Jihei, at Sebastian Izzard. Such chancy, do-it-yourself contextualising is a chief pleasure here.

Best stand? Mnuchin Gallery’s mini-retrospective of Willem de Kooning, centred on a sunburst pink/lemon abstraction “Flowers, Mary’s Table”, was the magnet throughout yesterday’s opening. The savage “Woman” series, highly textured sculptures (“Cross-Legged Figure”, “Hostess”) and emptied-out late paintings all excite in London, which seldom sees de Kooning, and missed the reassessments at MoMA’s 2011-12 retrospective.

Running close for erudite reappraisal and tour-de-force display is Mnuchin’s neighbour, Gmurzynska, which precisely reconstructs a seminal 1947 Wilfredo Lam show, with surrealist compositions hung at crazy angles off the ceiling, and mask-like portraits and “Jungle” paintings playing figuration against abstraction, Picasso against Pollock. Lam, the continent-hopping Cuban communist son of a Chinese railroad worker and African mother, embodied globalisation before the word was invented. He embodies too the nerve centre Frieze Masters aims to hit – blue chip but not fully discovered modernism. A Tate show is under discussion.

Who makes history? Increasingly the market – which is why modernism, its nuances still to be negotiated, triumphs in impact and scope here over Old Masters as marvellous as Velázquez’s “Portrait of a Gentleman” (Otto Naumann) and Antonello’s “Madonna” (Moretti), and energises our response to them. Seventeenth-century polychrome wood/silk religious figures at Coll & Cortés look like modern mixed-media installations; austere ancient sculpture at Rupert Wace takes on modern echoes in Hans Josephsohn’s enigmatic stele form (1953) at Hauser & Wirth.

I lost count of the numerous Calders on every aisle – following last year’s sensational six-metre “Rouge triomphante” at Helly Nahmad, Calder is this year’s must-have – but how bizarre to find his abstract metal shapes in primary colours flapping even among the jewel-like Brueghels, Avercamp and 15th-century Master of Schongau at De Jonckheere. Free-floating, upwardly mobile and in august but unexpected company – Calder is the poster-boy for Frieze Masters.

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Arts

Saatchi’s and Christie’s Present THINKING BIG Today

Saatchi's and Christie's Present THINKING BIG Today

Exhibition: 12-18 October 2013 | The Sorting Office, 21-31 New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1AP Auction: TODAY, 17 October 2013, at 5pm | Christie’s London, 8 King Street – St. James’s, London SW1Y 6QT

London – The Saatchi Gallery and Christie’s are proud to announce Thinking Big, a special auction of major contemporary sculpture and installation offered to support the Saatchi Gallery’s continuing policy for free entry to all exhibitions, and free education programme for schools.

To accommodate the monumental scale and scope of the work, Thinking Big will exhibited not at Christie’s, but at The Sorting Office, a vast former postal depot in central London, to coincide with the Frieze Art Fair in October 2013.

Francis Outred, Christie’s Head of Post-War & Contemporary Art, Europe, says, “We have been working with the Saatchi Gallery on this project for about a year now. This exhibition and auction will be pioneering in that all the works will be offered without estimate or reserve. In addition, a state of the art exhibition at the Sorting Office, a huge ex postal building in the heart of London, will house major sculpture and installation from across the last twenty years beginning with the Tracey Emin and the Chapman brothers to Berlinde de Bruyckere, who is one of the stand out artists at this year’s Venice Biennale. The artists come from five different continents and the exhibition and auction will be a fundamental celebration of the sculpture in the 21st century. Thinking Big refers to the huge ambition and imagination of the artists here, as much as it does to the scale of their work, and to the power of educating young people about art.”

Thinking Big features the work of 50 artists who have been shown at the Saatchi Gallery, including YBAs, such as Tracey Emin and the Chapman brothers, as well as newer talents such as Toby Ziegler, Kader Attia, Conrad Shawcross, Kris Martin and Sterling Ruby. Among the many leading contemporary artists included are Berlinde de Bruyckere, whose work at the Belgian Pavilion was a highlight of the 2013 Venice Biennale; Gert and Uwe Tobias, who had a solo show at London’s Whitechapel Gallery earlier this year; and David Altmejd, Karla Black and Liu Wei, all of whom were selected for Art Basel’s Art Unlimited show of large-scale sculpture this year.

Philippa Adams, Senior Director, Saatchi Gallery, comments: “Thinking Big aims to provide the broadest possible access and opportunity to museums, institutions and collectors alike by offering these works with no estimates and no reserves. This will be the first time in history that works of this scale will be so readily accessible. To this end, our endeavor is to reflect the Gallery’s commitment to constantly support and showcase emerging talent. We hope this new platform will bridge new dialogues and the works from this sale will be seen by new audiences across the world.”

The Saatchi Gallery has consistently collected high quality emerging work, whose importance has endured. It has also showcased new talent emerging around the globe, providing a widely visited museum environment for new art. The Thinking Big auction will support the Saatchi Gallery’s ongoing policy of free admission to all exhibitions and its free education programme – with over 2000 school visits each year.

The Saatchi Gallery will be thirty years old in 2015. It was the first art space in the UK to show a whole host of artists before they became household names, from Jeff Koons and Bruce Nauman to Andreas Gursky, Sigmar Polke and Damien Hirst. During the last five years it has showcased new art from the Middle East, China, India, Russia, Germany, America and Britain. Art from all of these regions, as well as the UK will be on display in Thinking Big.

According to The Art Newspaper, it hosted 10 of the top 15 most visited exhibitions in London over the last four years. The Saatchi Gallery believes that its policy of free admission to all exhibitions – supported by this auction – is fundamental to this success.

 

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THE GUARDIAN LONDON

Frieze Art Fair: Buyer choice expands from porn and puddles to a Brueghel

With work of 2,000 artists from galleries worldwide the fair at Regent’s Park, London, attracts collectors with deep pockets

Jeff Koons' Cat on a clothes line (yellow), 1994-2001

Jeff Koons’ Cat on a clothes line (yellow), on show at the Frieze Art Fair this week. Photograph: Sarah Lee for the Guardian

It is chucking it down in Regent’s Park, cars are splashing pedestrians, expensive frocks and suits are getting drenched. And, once you are inside the UK’s biggest commercial art fair, you can add to the experience by buying your own dirty black puddle.

Each one of Marlie Mul’s resin and sand hyperreal puddles would cost you €4,000 (£3,400)from the Frieze stand belonging to Fluxia, a young gallery based in Milan.

If you are not interested in splashing out on a puddle, then there are a further 151 contemporary art galleries displaying works in the vast tent that has appeared in the London park for the past 10 years.

As thousands descend on the fair – some buying, an awful lot more wishing they had the money to buy – hundreds of other galleries and museums open shows and have parties all over the capital. It is an art equivalent of the Japanese cherry blossom.

This year’s Frieze is as dizzying and as diverse as ever. You can see astonishingly expensive works by Jeff Koons (“We don’t release prices to the press,” a Gagosian gallerist sniffed); and you can see far, far more affordable works by the possible next generation – for example post-graduate Goldsmiths students Sam Keogh and Joseph Noonan-Ganley, on display at Kerlin Gallery‘s stand.

And you can see porn. There are content warning notices but it is very easy to stumble into a screening of Omer Fast’s Everything That Rises Must Converge, a four-channel film exploring the everyday and often ordinary lives of four hardcore porn film performers. It is being seen for the first time and does not spare viewers the graphic detail “although one of the things we found very compelling is the banality of the day at work”, said Euridice Arratia of Berlin gallery Arratia Beer. “They are very regular people, there is an unexpected normality.”

Arratia conceded it is a difficult work to sell – you would need €65,000 – but she hopes people will come and sit down and watch it.

A rather less in your face film is on display at Kate MacGarry’s gallery stall. Marcus Coates – one of the artists shortlisted to be next up on London’s Fourth Plinth – has made a film about hospice patient Alex.

Although the view is only from his window, the story is an epic one in that Alex told Coates he had always wanted to go the Amazon but obviously could not now – so could the artist go, which he did.

“It is a very moving film,” said MacGarry. “It is a very strong work which says a lot about Marcus’s wider practice.”

Also on display are National Geographic-style photographs Coates has made of birds and animals and then screwed up and let unravel. Each are in an edition of three and would cost you £4,500.

Should visitors need a break from the crowds and intensity of Frieze, a good place could be a curvy glass pavilion installed as the only exhibit for the Lisson Gallery. Called Groovy Spiral, visitors are encouraged to walk into it.

Lisson’s Ossian Ward said the work was a “people-watching experience. You feel like you’re in the calm in the middle of the storm and you’re on show as well. It is a nice place to be.”

It is a meditative work, on Wednesday still for sale for $600,000 (£375,000). Ward said: “You don’t get many moments for reflection at an art fair generally, a lot of what you see gets immediately forgotten, so it’s nice to have that one moment. Frieze has matured so galleries should mature with the fair and feel confident to do big and bold statements and not feel they just have to chase after the money.”

Frieze gets criticised because it is a place for conspicuous wealth and there may well will be oligarchs and hedge funders walking the aisles idly wondering what best to spend their millions on.

Matthew Slotover, fair co-founder, believes some of the criticisms are unfair.”Some of the prices can get very high and if you don’t like that then this is probably not the place for you,” he said. “For me it is a wonderful thing that private collectors and museums buy art and support living artists so they can carry on making their work.

“Also commercial galleries all over the world offer hundreds of free shows every month.”

With 2,000 artists at the fair it is also “an amazing opportunity to see a lot of what is going on”.

He said a lot more big collectors were present this year, helped by the successful debut last year of a parallel fair for historical art called Frieze Masters, 15 minutes walk away in the park’s north-west corner.

Here 130 galleries are selling their wares. For €22,000 you might be tempted by a Polynesian toggle, or for $1.5m an insanely kitsch example of Victorian narrative art, John Anster Fitzgerald’s painting of Shakespeare’s Bottom surrounded by fairies.

Or even a beautiful Brueghel winter scene, called The Census at Bethlehem, which, remarkably, was unknown and unrecorded until it was unveiled this week. The painting has been in the same family since it was bought direct from the artist’s studio in 1611 and for the past 60 years has been in east Africa. “When we took it off the wall a mummified gecko fell off the stretcher,” said Johnny Van Haeften, the Old Master dealer selling it.

It is Van Haeften’s first Frieze – “I saw all my clients here last year and thought I’d better come” – and he is encouraged. “People who collect modern art are now beginning to look back at Old Masters which are so much cheaper by comparison. This is a great masterpiece by Brueghel and it is £6m – what does that buy you in contemporary art?”

Fairs open to the public 17-20 October.

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BUSINESS DAY ONLINE

Africa through prisms

Filed under: Columnists |

It is sometimes frustrating to write this column all the time from this distant vantage point, so far from Amuwo Odofin. When I started it with uncertain frequency, some ten years ago, I was travelling often, and was able to offer all kinds of datelines, especially from Lagos, but also including Paris, Brussels, Dakar, Lomé, Cape Town, not to mention Kampala and Port of Spain, reporting on Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings (CHOGMs) in 2007 and 2009. Varied datelines continued when I switched to the weekly back-page format in June 2007. kaye-whiteman

 Now, reasons of ageing and problematic health have grounded me substantially, although in the past year I have still occasionally ventured abroad, especially since the surgeon’s scalpel no longer immediately threatens. Indeed, I have been in the last twelve months in Cape Town, Lagos and Brussels. The wandering journalist of my younger days always hankered for rare datelines. I will, however, not be doing CHOGM in Colombo this year, even though it promises to be one of the most turbulent of recent times (this is something to which I’ll be returning).

 Looking at Africa through a political prism, one notes that the politicos and would-be investors have all been pondering the somewhat farcical decision of the Mo Ibrahim Foundation not to award its famous $5m prize for good governance in Africa for the second year running.  There have been justifications for this – it is not awarded every year, indeed in seven years there have only been three winners. One of them, Festus Mogae ex-President of Botswana said it was not a censuring of leadership in Africa – there were still a lot of incumbent presidents doing a good job, and there are those who still argue that it should include incumbent rulers, and those who have shown “excellence in leadership” in fields outside government. Indeed, both Mandela and Tutu have had special awards. There is still an uncomfortable feeling about an award that is not conferred more times than it is – it is seen to be passing an adverse comment on African leadership. Maybe that is intended, but what a clumsy way of doing it. The Mo Ibrahim Index is a more apposite initiative, as it gives countries a yardstick against which to perform that compares fairly well with the UNDP’s Human Development Index.

 In his press conference, Mo was asked about the AU special summit early this month on the International Criminal Court, called because of a certain feeling of victimisation because only African leaders have so far been convoked to appear before it (a summit condemned strongly by Archbishop Desmond Tutu).  Mo said that there was no alternative to the ICC to cope with crimes against humanity, but the best way forward was to try and reform it, not to leave it, as some African headers reportedly wished to do, although this move was blocked by the summit. I also liked his comment that Africa needed neither Afro-optimism or afro-pessimism but “Afro-realism”

In London, however, we have also been looking at Africa through a different prism, that of art. The occasion has been the first ever  Contemporary Art Fair. This goes by the name of ‘1:54” – illustrating the unity of the African continent’s fifty-four countries. I cannot quite recall anything like it, although some contemporary African art was on show in both the Africa ’95 and Africa ‘05 Festivals. The fair, held in several rooms of the Palladian surroundings of Somerset House in the Strand grouped fifteen different selected galleries and over seventy artists. The organisers comment is that it is “a rare opportunity to expose the rapidly emerging African art market” in all its vast variety (painting, drawing, photography, sculpture – with artists working in many materials). The emphasis may seem to be very much on the new commercial possibilities the work of Africa’s growing body of creative artists present for dealers and brokers (one hopes the artists are also able to retrieve their share), but for those of us in London, it is still a promising area for promoting Africa’s image. It would be invidious to start listing names here, but I do want to commend the October Gallery, which has a well-situated room in the fair, and has consistently supported African artists over the past thirty years. I feel that with this show their faith has been justified, as a step-change is taking place in awareness.

 It is significant that the 1: 54 fair coincides with the annual Frieze Art Fair, described in The Times as “an elite bun-fight between oligarchs, bankers and film stars”, which is also a dream world for art pseuds, socialites and Prosecco-loving celebrity-spotters tottering between private views. The 1:54 show is fortunately not quite there, although not short of the show-business aspects of the art world The media publicity has been good, and as a sympathetic piece in The Financial Times observed it is a “snapshot of a continent” with “an array stamped by its diversity.” In short, very prismatic.

 By: Kaye Whiteman

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DB ARTMAG 77

Jubilee in Regent’s Park: 10th Year of Deutsche Bank’s Partnership with Frieze London

Mathilde ter Heijne, Woman to Go, 2003–. Deutsche Bank Collection. © Mathilde ter Heijne. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Mathilde ter Heijne, Woman to Go, 2003–. Deutsche Bank Collection. © Mathilde ter Heijne. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer
Mathilde ter Heijne, Woman to Go, 2003–. Deutsche Bank Collection. © Mathilde ter Heijne. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Mathilde ter Heijne, Woman to Go, 2003–. Deutsche Bank Collection. © Mathilde ter Heijne. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer
Rivane Neuenschwander, I Wish your Wish, 2003. New Museum, New York. Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York

Rivane Neuenschwander, I Wish your Wish, 2003. New Museum, New York. Courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York
Gerry Bibby, Pacing Wall Progressing Columns (2013) Video Still. Performance Video.  Performed at Kunsthalle Bremen 14th & 15th Sep. 21012 by Adam Linder & Gerry Bibby.. Courtesy the Artist and Silberkuppe

Gerry Bibby, Pacing Wall Progressing Columns (2013) Video Still. Performance Video. Performed at Kunsthalle Bremen 14th & 15th Sep. 21012 by Adam Linder & Gerry Bibby.. Courtesy the Artist and Silberkuppe
Andreas Angelidakis, Design for Frieze Projects 2013. Courtesy of the artist and The Breeder Gallery (Athens, Greece)

Andreas Angelidakis, Design for Frieze Projects 2013. Courtesy of the artist and The Breeder Gallery (Athens, Greece)
Angelo Plessas, Temple of Truth Tlatelolco. Courtesy of the artist

Angelo Plessas, Temple of Truth Tlatelolco. Courtesy of the artist
Josef Strau, Paperweight for the Arcadia Diary, 2007. Courtesy of the artist and Vilma Gold, London

Josef Strau, Paperweight for the Arcadia Diary, 2007. Courtesy of the artist and Vilma Gold, London
Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Why Should Our Bodies End At the Skin 2012. Video still. Image courtesy The Artist; Mary Mary, Glasgow

Lili Reynaud-Dewar, Why Should Our Bodies End At the Skin 2012. Video still. Image courtesy The Artist; Mary Mary, Glasgow
Frieze London is one of the most important art fairs worldwide; it always pursues new paths as a way of staying dynamic. Frieze has had Deutsche Bank as its partner since its second edition. As every year, Deutsche Bank will be present at the fair, with a lounge in which it will show works from its collection. This year, the focus is on the feminist postcard installation Woman to Go by Mathilde ter Heijne. For this project the Dutch artist, to whom an entire floor of the Deutsche Bank Towers is devoted, researched the biographies of around 300 forgotten women. They are artists, pirates or suffragettes who fell victim to male-dominated historiography. On the postcards, per Heijne combines their extraordinary biographies with historical portraits of unknown women. Visitors to the lounge are invited to take postcards with them, as a piece of history and as inspiration for the present. Special versions of the installation were also created for the ArtMag stands at the Frieze Art Fair and the Frieze Masters. Here too visitors can take postcards. At these stands, new subscribers to the magazine also receive a bag printed with a Woman to Go motif.The fair’s recipe for success includes setting standards not merely as a marketplace, but also as a cultural platform. Frieze has always been a fair for important collectors, but it’s also a public event that over 60,000 visitors now flock to each year. This year, the fair presents itself in Regent’s Park with even more space than before, in a new architectural setting designed by the London agency Carmody Groarke, which has been responsible for the design of the tents since 2011. Once again, over 150 international galleries are taking part. Among the new participants are big names like Blum & Poe (Los Angeles) and Max Hetzler (Berlin), as well as newcomers such as Rodeo of Istanbul, which has previously taken part in the young section Frame and is now conquering the main fair.Frieze Projects has always been one of the fair’s highlights. This year, curated by Nicola Lees, these commissioned works will be even more interdisciplinary in nature than before. Already as curator at the Serpentine Gallery alongside Hans-Ulrich Obrist, she encouraged artists to experiment with a wide variety of media. Now, Lees has invented a new format for Frieze: for the first time, invited artists present their works on a modular stage designed by Andreas Angelidakis that will change on a daily basis. Rivane Neuenschwander, whose works occupy an entire floor in the Deutsche Bank Towers in Frankfurt, includes the audience in her performance, playing off one of her most recent installations, The Conversation (2010), which was inspired by Coppola’s surveillance thriller of the same name. Gerry Bibby’s performance series is also based on the idea of participation. Here, however, the main roles are played by fair staff and a pile of oysters that are consumed. And in the work of Ken Okiishi, it’s robots that intermingle with the public.Only a few minutes away on foot from Frieze London, Frieze Masters shows art from antiquity to the 20th century—from a contemporary perspective. Deutsche Bank is also partner to this fair. Its extraordinary quality and unique mix of various epochs already met with overwhelmingly positive resonance last year. Once again, around 120 of the leading galleries and art traders worldwide will come to London. Here, too, the fascination derives from the relationship to contemporary art. This can be seen in the Frieze Masters Talks, in which artists like John Currin, Beatriz Milhazes, and Catherine Opie talk to directors and curators over the influence historical works have exerted on their art.Frieze London & Frieze Masters
October 17–20, 2013
Regent’s Park, London


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DAZED DIGITAL

Frieze London: the must-sees

The best of the best contemporary art from in and around Frieze London this weekend

Trevor Paglen 2
morris
Juneau Project
kraupa
Harm van del Dorpel
Trevor Paglen 2
Sarah Lucas

SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble

In the most eagerly anticipated institutional show for quite some time, Sarah Lucas‘ YBA upbringing matures to form an important and ever-relevant legacy. All the usual features apply – the stuffed nylon tights, the breezeblock plinths – alongside the old guard that made her name – the two fried eggs, the bucket and cucumber. Lucas, as the self-styled bad girl of British art proves she’s still got it and in this case shows the next generation of DM wearing wanna-be-bad-girl-artists how to play with the big boys. Whitechapel disclaimer: ‘the exhibition contains sexually explicit materials and is not recommended for children’.

Click here to read Susanna Davies-Crook’s interview for Dazed Digital with Sarah Lucas and Has Ulrich Obrist.

Whitechapel Gallery, 2 October – 15 December 2013

Sarah Lucas
SITUATION Absolute Beach Man Rubble Sarah Lucas

FRIEZE ART FAIR

The indominable art fair of our time once again sprawls it’s stud-walled tendrils across Regent’s Park. The highlights this year are happening in parallel to the galleries’ booth presentations in the various curated Frieze programmes that seem to exponentially grow year on year. Within ‘Frieze Focus’ Omer Fast presents ‘Spam Atlas’, a new work which starts with an email describing a financial opportunity resulting from the death of a lonely but very wealthy person, next to Trevor Paglen’s ‘Non-functional Satellite’ that could be viewed from Earth as a flickering star or up close as a sail-like minimalist sculpture, created for the purpose of entering orbit then burning up without trace. In ‘Frieze Film’ Petra Cortright presents her internet-inspired, experimental software videos whilst over in ‘Frieze Masters’ Victoria Miro gallery lodges Alice Neel in the macho narrative of ‘master’ artists. In the section reserved for developing galleries, Pilvi Takala at Carlos Ishikawa London presents a project inspired by infiltrating ‘college moms’; the wives of faculty staff on US college campuses.

Trevor Paglen 2
Non-functional Satellite Trevor Paglen

GCC Achievements in Swiss Summit, 2013

Project Native Informant

GCC are a collective founded in 2013 of artists that including the multi-talented musician and artist and Fatima Al Qadiri alongside Abdullah Al-Mutairi, Amal Khalaf, Aziz Al Qatami, Barrak Alzaid, Khalid al Gharaballi, Monira Al Qadiri, Nanu Al-Hamad and Sophia Al Maria. This exhibition acts as a fortification of their collaborative practice which first and foremost aims to ‘effect collaboration, transformation and inter-connection between Artists in all fields in order to achieve unity between them’. Drawing on diplomatic protocols, ceremonial pomp and accomplishments made during the GCC collective’s first meeting in Morschach, Switzerland. ‘this show represents the official Communiqué of the cooperative: a High Level Strategic Dialogue’.

During Frieze week, the exhibition will additionally be open Sunday and Monday, 20 – 21 October 2013 12:00 – 18:00 and by appointment.

Florence Peake, Michael Dean, Juliette Blightman and Rodney Graham

David Roberts Art Foundation

The gallery transforms from it’s daytime persona as the host of current Orpheus Twice exhibition into the setting for a performance of new work by 4 artists. Florence Peake presents a double duet new movement work followed by ‘an act’ by Michael Dean that poetically introduces itself, ‘How inanimate that alphabet. With the policy of its use in its face. A demonstration of the letter n for you. You user with your policies.’ Juliette Blightman presents a characteristically subtle new work ‘Between Acts’ and finally Rodney Graham plays his psychedelic ‘Softcore – More Solo Guitar Music for the Sex Scene, Zabriskie Point’.

Free admission. 7pm

rodney
Rodney Graham

Post-Net Aesthetics

ICA

In a week when the art world comes to town, it’s important to get some perspective. This talk investigates the roots, developments and outcomes of the term ‘post-internet’, drawing together Arcadia Missa’s Rozsa Farkas, artis tHarm van den Dorpel (who recreated the Game of Thrones throne in his berlin space amongst other things), Ben Vickers and editor of Mute Magazine Josephine Berry-Slater. A good line-up if you’re interested in unravelling the intricacies of the much-bandied, slippery and potentially soon to be canonised term ‘post-internet’ and further conceptualising the ‘post-net aesthetic’.

Showing 17 October 2013, 4pm

Harm van del Dorpel
Harm van del Dorpel

Cory Arcangel

Dances for Electric Piano

Bringing his blend of tech-pop, computer-game-fetishist music-heavy art to the ICA, Cory Arcangel presents a new ‘suite’ of piano compositions . Arcangel aficionados be not afeared, the music in question will be performed solo by John Reid on a Korg M1 electric piano, an instrument made famous by it’s late 80s influence on classic rave and trance. This event comprises part of the 25 frames season by Film & Video Umbrella.

Showing at London’s ICA on 18 October 2013, 8pm

cory
Cory Arcangel

Sunday Art Fair

In the tradition of the namesake day of the week, Sunday is a more chilled out affair, and an increasingly welcome and inspiring accompaniment to Frieze booth mania. Adding new blood and backbone to the Frieze train in it’s fourth incarnation, Sunday invites younger galleries which in turn means that for the most part the artists shown are ones to watch / next big things / bright young things. New this year are LA’s FreedmanFitzpatrick at only their second ever fair exhibiting Mathis Altmann & Lucie Stahl, and Berlin’s charge-leading Kraupa-Tuskany-Zeidler showing Dazed faves Katja Novitskova and Avery Singer.

Showing at London’s Ambika P3 17 – 20 October 2013

kraupa
Kraupa-Tuskany-Zeidler

Andy Holden @ Zabludowicz Collection

Maximum Irony! Maximum Sincerity, 1999-2003: Towards a Unified Theory of MI!MS

The Music of MI!MS – a short lived art movement established by Holden during his teenage years in Bedford – will be performed, this time inviting The Grubby Mitts and Johnny Parry Orchestra to add their own spin on things.   An experimental live set combine with video and spoken word in a half-remembered nostalgic investigation of irony, sincerity and teenage intellectual dilemmas oddly in tune with the zeitgeist of the time and America’s David Foster Wallace inspired ‘New Sincerity’. The event takes place alongside Andy Holden‘s room-filling three storey installation containing environments and assemblages of ephemera that influenced the artist as a teenager.

Friday 18 October 2013 8-11pm

Juneau Projects

Happy Redoubt Robot Racing

A bit of light entertainment infused with art intellectualism, this robot contest comprises one of the events leading up to Juneau Projects forthcoming exhibition ‘Welcome to Happy Redoubt’. Betting on a robot will result in (hopefully) winning tokens, which can then be later spent throughout November in the artist duos’ ‘interactive post-apocalyptic encampment’, inspired by sci-fi writer Neal Stephenson’s concept of the ‘infocalypse’.  The installation will boast its own marketplace which will expose systems, create new mechanisms and challenge obsolescence.

Wednesday 16th October 8-9pm

This event is free and open to all but booking is required

Welcome to Happy Redoubt (6 November – 15 December 2013)

Juneau Project
Happy Redoubt Robot Racing Juneau Projects

Morris Louis, Cyprien Gaillard

Sprüth Magers

For his Frieze week solo exhibition, the French-born but Berlin-based enfant terrible of legendary beer-tower-sculpture fame pairs himself with another risk-taker of the avante-garde, colour field pioneer Morris Louis. Gaillard’s interventions in images from an archive of National Geographic catalogs refashioned into glueless wave collages, weave through a history of colour, representation and evolution. His bronze ‘Fence (after Owen Luder)’ security barrier exchanges knowing glances with Morris’ 1958 work ‘Beth Samach’. In dialogue with Morris, Gaillard investigates ruins and trace, disintegration and desolation.

Oct 15th – November 16th 2013

morris
Sprüth Magers Cyprien Gaillard

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THE AGE – NATIONAL

A woman poses for a photograph in front of artwork by Jeff Koons at the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England.

A woman poses for a photograph in front of artwork by Jeff Koons at the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. Photo: Getty Images

A man admires a painting by Richard Phillips entitled 'Sasha II' in the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England.

A man admires a painting by Richard Phillips entitled ‘Sasha II’ in the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. Photo: Getty Images

A visitor photographs part of Robert Pruitt's "Safety Cones" at the Gavin Brown's Enterprise from New York's stand at the Frieze Art Fair in central London

A visitor photographs part of Robert Pruitt’s “Safety Cones” at the Gavin Brown’s Enterprise from New York’s stand at the Frieze Art Fair in central London Photo: Reuters

Art dealers with the Galerie Sanct Lucas wait in their exhibition space in the Frieze Masters Art Fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London's Regent's Park and runs from October 17 to 20. The exhibition comprises of the Frieze Masters exhibition and Frieze London which aim to showcase historic and established art as well as contemporary works.

Art dealers with the Galerie Sanct Lucas wait in their exhibition space in the Frieze Masters Art Fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London’s Regent’s Park and runs from October 17 to 20. The exhibition comprises of the Frieze Masters exhibition and Frieze London which aim to showcase historic and established art as well as contemporary works. Photo: Getty Images

A woman views Ron Mueck's artwork 'Woman with Shopping' at the Frieze London art fair.

A woman views Ron Mueck’s artwork ‘Woman with Shopping’ at the Frieze London art fair. Photo: Getty Images

Members of the public admire Eduardo Basualdo's artwork 'TEORIA' at the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London's Regent's Park and runs from October 17 to 20. The exhibition comprises of the Frieze Masters exhibition and Frieze London which aim to showcase historic and established art as well as contemporary works.

Members of the public admire Eduardo Basualdo’s artwork ‘TEORIA’ at the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London’s Regent’s Park and runs from October 17 to 20. The exhibition comprises of the Frieze Masters exhibition and Frieze London which aim to showcase historic and established art as well as contemporary works. Photo: Getty Images

A man admires artworks by David Shrigley in the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England.

A man admires artworks by David Shrigley in the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. Photo: Getty Images

A man admires Jaume Plensa's sculpture entitled 'Chloe' in Regent's Park, which is part of the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London's Regent's Park and runs from October 17 to 20.

A man admires Jaume Plensa’s sculpture entitled ‘Chloe’ in Regent’s Park, which is part of the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London’s Regent’s Park and runs from October 17 to 20. Photo: Getty Images

A work entitled "He" by Danish artist Michael Elmgreen and Norwegian artist Ingar Dragset (Elmgreen and Dragset)  is displayed at the Frieze London art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England, on October 16, 2013.  Running from October 17-20, 2013,

A work entitled “He” by Danish artist Michael Elmgreen and Norwegian artist Ingar Dragset (Elmgreen and Dragset) is displayed at the Frieze London art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England, on October 16, 2013. Running from October 17-20, 2013, Photo: AFP

A woman talks on her phone as she stands near works entitled "Lounge Lover" by British artist Dee Ferris (L), "Nia" by Japanese artist Tomoaki Suzuki (C) and "Blue Milk" by Dee Ferris (R)  at the Frieze London art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England

A woman talks on her phone as she stands near works entitled “Lounge Lover” by British artist Dee Ferris (L), “Nia” by Japanese artist Tomoaki Suzuki (C) and “Blue Milk” by Dee Ferris (R) at the Frieze London art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England Photo: AFP

A man looks at a piece by US artist Jeff Koons at the Frieze London art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England, on October 16, 2013.

A man looks at a piece by US artist Jeff Koons at the Frieze London art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England, on October 16, 2013. Photo: AFP

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A woman looks confused as she looks at work by British artist David Shrigley entitled "A Burden" at the Frieze London art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England

A woman looks confused as she looks at work by British artist David Shrigley entitled “A Burden” at the Frieze London art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England Photo: AFP

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Visitors look at "Blue Skies" by late US artist Jean-Michel Basquiat at the Frieze Masters art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England,

Visitors look at “Blue Skies” by late US artist Jean-Michel Basquiat at the Frieze Masters art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England, Photo: AFP

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A 19th century Italian marble Vanitas is displayed at the Frieze Masters art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England.

A 19th century Italian marble Vanitas is displayed at the Frieze Masters art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England. Photo: AFP

A visitor is pictured with work by artists Gerhard Richter "Funfzehn Farben (Fifteen colours)" (L) and John Chamberlain "Dearie Oso Enseau" during a private viewing of the Frieze Masters 2013 art fair in London.

A visitor is pictured with work by artists Gerhard Richter “Funfzehn Farben (Fifteen colours)” (L) and John Chamberlain “Dearie Oso Enseau” during a private viewing of the Frieze Masters 2013 art fair in London. Photo: Reuters

A couple stand near a work entitle "Flat Tyre" by British artist Gavin Turk as they look at a work entitled "Flag I" by South African artist Willem Boshof is displayed at the Frieze London art fair in Regent's Park, north London, England, on October 16, 2013.  Running from October 17-20, 2013,  Frieze London features over 150 of the most exciting contemporary art galleries in the world.

A couple stand near a work entitle “Flat Tyre” by British artist Gavin Turk as they look at a work entitled “Flag I” by South African artist Willem Boshof is displayed at the Frieze London art fair in Regent’s Park, north London, England, on October 16, 2013. Running from October 17-20, 2013, Frieze London features over 150 of the most exciting contemporary art galleries in the world. Photo: AFP

LONDON, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 16: An artwork by David Shrigley entitled ‘Untitled (look at this)’ is exhibited in the Frieze London art fair on October 16, 2013 in London, England. The annual Frieze Art Fair takes place in London’s Regent’s Park and runs from October 17 to 20. The exhibition comprises of the Frieze Masters exhibition and Frieze London which aim to showcase historic and established art as well as contemporary works. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)

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THE GUARDIAN LONDON

Bigger, brighter, better: Frieze London 2013

With its giant womb, its spiral glass corridor and its big inky puddles, this year’s Frieze art fair is like a big playground

Adrian Searle inside Judith Rubell’s Portrait of the Artist, 2013

Don’t ask … Adrian Searle inside Judith Rubell’s Portrait of the Artist, 2013. Photograph: Sarah Lee for the Guardian

I have had a tango alone in a darkened room with nothing but a portrait of Marilyn Monroe for company (this sort of thing I can do almost as well at home). I have tracked a pool of ink across nice grey floors, and almost been splatted by paintballs. I have eyed up a dangling noose, but it looks like someone else has already tried Elmgreen & Dragset‘s gibbet (the frayed rope lies useless on the floor). That was when I climbed back into the womb to try to escape, only to be pounced on by a gang of paparazzi. All this, and I’ve only been at Frieze for two hours. I do so love an art fair.

  1. Frieze
  2. Regent’s Park,
  3. London
  1. Until 20 October
  2. More details

Once more into the killing fields! The artists represented by London’s Limoncello gallery hang around its stand, waiting for someone to chat them up, or possibly buy them. People are so much more fun than art – and by and large self-cleaning. Nearby, at Fluxia (over from Milan), puddles of black goo sit on the floor, with decorative bits of binbag and weeds mired in the stickiness. What would one do with these cowpat-sized objects? Or with the giant black foil rock that hangs from the ceiling of a Berlin stand? I guess you could position yourself under it, so it looks like a “thinks” bubble, to signal your bad mood.

Dunno, by Urs Fischer Dunno, by Urs Fischer, 2012. Photograph: Sarah Lee for the GuardianAt Sadie Coles, Urs Fischer‘s giant fried egg lies on the carpet, perfectly cooked, but out of scale to any but the most gargantuan appetite (and everybody knows collectors only peck at things, their appetites reserved only for beefed-up art).

Art fairs may be all the same, filled with schlock, shiny things, grim things, and things that make you wonder why galleries across the globe bothered to drag them all the way here, but there’s always something to brighten your day as you wander the aisles. The 11th incarnation of Frieze is more manageable than most, with better lighting, wider aisles and a bigger spread of behemoth mega-galleries and startup spaces, young galleries and old lags. Not that the art is necessarily better, though the galleries seem to be trying harder this year.

Now for a nice lie down. In the Project Space, a fountain in the middle of a bed spouts black ink on to the white sheets, and on to the book being read aloud by Lili Reynaud-Dewar, nestling on the plumped-up pillows. It’s a dirty book anyway, In My Room by Guillaume Dustan, and as she reads the line, “I was lying on the bed jerking off, smoking a joint” in a delicate voice, the artist starts getting spattered, too. More ink leaks from the pump beneath the bed and oozes over my shoes. I like to get up close and personal at fairs. It’s the only way to focus.

Rather than the usual collection of cash-cow artists, Lisson shows a single work, a huge spiral Plexiglas corridor by veteran American artist Dan Graham. You wander in to the middle, view the passing crowds through the curving walls, then walk out again, refreshed. It is an oasis. Nearby, at Gavin Brown, two lovely nocturnal cityscapes by Alex Katz, with lit windows on a dark New York night, look over Rob Pruitt’s mad, humanoid fluorescent orange traffic cones. This is fun. Round the corner is another big Katz, of buildings in a blizzard. It is magical.

Cat on a Clothes Line (Yellow), by Jeff Koons Cat on a Clothes Line (Yellow), by Jeff Koons, 1994-2001. Photograph: Sarah Lee for the GuardianFinding things that stop you in your tracks here is easy, but mostly for the wrong reasons. You tend to gawp, incredulous. There are a great many overblown stupidities here, the sort that only seem to come out at art fairs. You could count Jeff Koons‘s huge wrapped bouquet and his cute pussy-in-a-sock sculpture among these, though there are many who see his work as a Duchampian critique of excess.

Jennifer Rubell’s giant, reclining, all-white Portrait of the Artist has a large sculpted hollow for a womb. You can climb in and curl up, in full view of the passing trade. As a serious art critic, I felt it my duty to get on board. What would you do with a thing like this? Where would anyone keep it? Why? Do not ask.

At Michael Werner, four people huddle together, all enveloped in one big black dress, a 1967 work by the late James Lee Byars. How these people keep themselves amused all day every day at Frieze is a mystery. Are they naked under there?

On Juana de Aizpuru’s stand, Tania Bruguera has reproduced the infamous Nazi “Arbeit macht frei” sign from Auschwitz concentration camp. The original was stolen in 2009 (it has since been recovered). Bruguera’s copy leans in a corner, surrounded by metal-cutting tools. The artist wishes, apparently, to reference historical memory.

Never a great context for looking at anything, fairs are more and more the places where collectors congregate and buy. In an unfortunate juxtaposition, a drawing of a lemon by Mike Kelley hangs over the sign referencing the song by Led Zeppelin about squeezing my lemon till the juice runs down my leg. For some reason, all this upset me, but only for a moment. After a bit, you just stop caring.

Le Monde en Miniature et la Mode en Miniature, by Meschac Gaba Le Monde en Miniature et la Mode en Miniature, by Meschac Gaba, 2008. Photograph: S/arah Lee for the Guardian

What is the right context for Bruguera’s sign? Everything becomes a hostage to fortune here. You have to be open to the absurd. At Stevenson, from South Africa, Meschac Gaba shows an array of children’s clothes, all embroidered with volatile French words: Kalachnikov. Inceste. Pédophilie. Prison. Slavery. Sida (Aids). Terroriste. In part, this is a play on shop displays, and the kinds of signage kids all over the world wear on their clothing. But this is more about the signs people don’t wear. These words are labels that float about and sometimes stick.

You have to keep moving, stay a moving target. Swivel-eyed dealers wait to pounce. Here’s a Gerhard Richter, there’s a room of shouty Julian Schnabel paintings, now a sculpture of a squatting woman delivering a very small poo, by David Shrigley. And over there, a thing that looks like art but probably isn’t. This time next year, it will be forgotten, probably in a collector’s warehouse somewhere. At Laura Bartlett Gallery, gigantic currency notes lie framed on the floor. Mmmm, smell that money – but watch out for the cowpats.

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BLOOMBERG

Koons Leads $2 Billion Art-Market Test for Frieze Week

By Scott Reyburn – Oct 14, 2013 4:00 PM PT
  • London’s Frieze Week starts today with a record 10 fairs, about as many auctions and numerous dealer shows boosting the value of the art on sale to as much as $2 billion.

Frieze Art Fair in Regent’s Park opens to VIP visitors tomorrow and attracts billionaires looking for new art stars and established names. Among the 152 galleries taking part, Gagosian will be showing five large-scale works by Jeff Koons. The sister event, Frieze Masters, opens today with 130 dealers showing a contrasting range of modern and historic works.

Jeff Koons

“Sacred Heart (Blue/Magenta)” (1994 to 2007) by Jeff Koons. The stainless steel sculpture was made for the U.S.-based artist’s “Celebration” series. Source: Gagosian via Bloomberg

Bastet

Lothar Schnepf/PAD London via Bloomberg

 A sculpture of the ancient Egyptian goddess Bastet in the shape of a cat. Dating from about 600 BC, the bronze will be shown by Gordian Weber Kunsthandel, Germany, at the Pavilion of Art + Design in London, which previews on Oct. 15. Photographer: Lothar Schnepf/PAD London via Bloomberg

Sterling Ruby

Robert Wedemeyer/Hauser & Wirth via Bloomberg 

“SP246” (2013) by Sterling Ruby. The painting, spray paint on canvas, will be priced at $550,000 at the Hauser & Wirth booth during the Freize Art Fair at Regent’s Park. Photographer: Robert Wedemeyer/Hauser & Wirth via Bloomberg

Oscar Murillo

FXP London 2013/David Zwirner via Bloomberg 

“574#” (2013) by Oscar Murillo. The work, oil paint, oil stick, graphite and studio-dirt, will be shown, priced up to $150,000, at the David Zwirner booth during the Frieze Art Fair, which opens to VIP visitors on Oct. 16. Source: FXP London 2013/David Zwirner via Bloomberg

“The pace is non-stop,” New York-based art adviser Heather Flow said in an interview. “There are a lot of art fairs this week, though I’m not sure if too many good things to see is such a bad problem. The search for the next superstar is gathering momentum. Secondary market prices are astronomical.”

Frieze and its offshoots have grown into the biggest seven-day concentration of art-market events in any European capital. Also opening today are the Pavilion of Art + Design in Berkeley Square and the inaugural 1:54 fair of contemporary African art at Somerset House.

Starting tomorrow, Phillips, Sotheby’s (BID) and Christie’s International will be offering more than 900 works of postwar and contemporary art valued at as much as 152.9 million pounds ($245 million).

Balloon Dog

The Koons works at Gagosian’s Frieze booth include the stainless steel “Sacred Heart (Blue/Magenta), (1994-2007), part of the U.S.-based artist’s “Celebration” series. Gagosian never discloses prices to the media. A version of “Balloon Dog” from the series is estimated to sell for between $35 million and $55 million at Christie’s New York next month.

A recent painting by Colombian-born Oscar Murillo, priced at as much as $150,000, will be shown at Frieze by the New York-and London-based dealer David Zwirner.

Two years ago, paintings by Murillo, who has a London studio, could be bought for less than $3,000. He is now hailed by some as the new Jean-Michel Basquiat. One of his abstracts sold for a record $401,000 at Phillips New York on Sept. 19.

Hauser & Wirth will show U.S.-based Sterling Ruby’s 2013 spray paint-on-canvas “SP246,” priced at $550,000, typifying the upper price levels at a fair that specializes in works by younger, living artists. More valuable works by dead artists, stretching back to Old Masters and beyond, will be shown today at the second edition of Frieze Masters.

Old Master

The event has been bolstered by the arrival of heavyweight exhibitors such as the London-based Old Master specialist Johnny van Haeften, and New York’s Mnuchin and Dominique Levy galleries, who will bring big-ticket 20th-century classics.

“The fair has reinvigorated interest in people coming to London for this week,” says the dealer Thomas Dane, who is exhibiting at both Frieze events. “Masters is more of an adventure, and hopefully the connoisseurship we see at that event will spill over into Frieze.” He has a 1950s Lucian Freud drawing ofFrancis Bacon, priced at 1.3 million pounds.

The Pavilion of Art + Design London, a fair of 60 dealers held in a temporary structure near Claridge’s and the Connaught hotels, includes a white single-cut Lucio Fontana “Concetto Spaziale, Attesa,” priced at 6 million euros ($8.15 million) on the booth of the London dealer Ben Brown Fine Arts. Paris-based Galerie Applicat-Prazan will be showing a 1953 Pierre Soulages abstract at 3.5 million euros.

The main innovation of this year’s Frieze Week is the first 1:54 fair devoted to contemporary African art with 15 dealers.

The fair will include photographs by Angola’s Edson Chagas, who won the Golden Lion for his nation’s pavilion at the Venice Biennale in June. The London-based Jack Bell Gallery will be showing art made of weapons from the Mozambique civil war by Goncalo Mabunda. Prices for the artist range from 5,000 pounds to 14,000 pounds.

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The Guardian home

Frieze art fair 2013: 10 things to see

From a retrospective by art’s king of pop, Jeff Koons, to a video laying bare the porn industry, via a collection of Matisse masterpieces, here’s what to seek out at Frieze

Frieze - Jeff Koons View larger picture

Pop star … Jeff Koons’s Sacred Heart (Blue/Magenta). Click to enlarge

1) Shiny happy people

No one sums up big-money art-fair glamour like Jeff Koons. The pop-art superstar and master of shiny surfaces shows key works from the last two decades here. Expect hisSacred Heart, wrapped in blue foil like a chocolate, and his Lobster, which masquerades as a party balloon.
Frieze: Jeff Koons, Gagosian Gallery

2) 24 hours as a porn star

Omer Fast’s X-rated video Everything That Rises Must Converge is a must-see. It’s a bare-all look at the LA porn industry, showing 24 hours in the life of real porn stars. But Fast, who’s never one to keep things simple, has interwoven the sex with stories of illegal immigration and dinosaur egg theft.
Frieze Focus: Omer Fast, Arratia Beer Gallery

3) The art of paintballing

Ken Okiishi’s paintballing should be the ultimate splatterfest: a carnival-style shooting gallery, with paint guns aimed at canvases. But instead of visitors having to put down their champagne and get their hands dirty, little remote controlled robots – pet-sized takes on drones, perhaps – will bomb their targets while filming, then mop up their own mess.
Frieze Special Project: Ken Okiishi

4) Block party

The theme of this year’s Frieze special projects is “play” – and nothing says play likeJudy Chicago’s Rearrangeable Rainbow Blocks. An early work by the feminist art titan, these supersized building blocks are a prod at macho sculpture. It’s as if some toddler giant has left them in the sculpture park for other overgrown kids to experiment with.
Frieze Sculpture Park: Judy Chicago

Frieze - Pivi Takala Detail from Pivi Takala’s Drive With Care

5) School of thought

Pilvi Takala’s video Drive With Care sees the Finnish artist go undercover in an elite US boarding school. What comes across is a Truman Show kind of existence: a self-contained world that the staff rarely leave, and where the “college moms” (faculty wives) spend their days power-walking the grounds.
Frieze Frame and Emdash Award Winner: Pilvi Takala, Carlos Ishikawa Gallery

6) Cover to cover

Whether dancing through galleries naked and doused in paint or working in a glass room in a public park, Lili Reynaud-Dewar is ever the exhibitionist. Her Frieze installation turns an intimate bedroom setting into a public stage. Sitting in a bed gradually soaking herself in ink, she’ll be reading from her favourite autobiographies, including that of French author Marguerite Duras.
Frieze Special Project: Lili Reynaud-Dewar

7) Game theory

The Brazilian artist Rivane Neuenschwander once got a security firm to bug a gallery then tore up the walls and floors until she’d discovered the secret surveillance devices. For Frieze Projects, her version of Battleships continues the mind games, turning the traditional pastime into an interactive wall installation that visitors can rip through to uncover lurking vessels.
Frieze Project: Rivane Neuenschwander

Frieze - Matisse Henri Matisse’s Tête de jeune fille (1951)

8) Matisse’s many faces

If you wanted to make a noise at Frieze’s new Masters offshoot, you could scarcely do better than with Matisse. Portraits are the focus of this solo presentation of drawings, paintings and sculptures, which show off his virtuoso technical skills. There’s also the rare chance to see his early bronze nude Olga, with her ingeniously twisting form designed to be appreciated from any angle.
Frieze Masters: Matisse, Thomas Gibson Fine Art Ltd

9) Requiem for a dream

In the glittery confines of an art fair it’s good to be reminded that culture is about more than cold hard cash. “How can art help people?” is a question that runs deep for Marcus Coates, the eccentric Brit known for his performances dressed as a shaman. A solo show features his standout film and audio work The Trip, created at St John’s Hospice, where he offered to realise a dying patient’s lifelong dream – and ended up travelling to the Amazon.
Frieze: Marcus Coates, Kate MacGarry Gallery

10) Name’s not down, not coming in

Right outside the Frieze tent is a fitting location for Elmgreen & Dragset‘s sendup of hierarchy But I’m on the Guestlist Too!. It’s an oversized VIP glass door that stands alone like a magic portal to an enchanted land – and has its own real-life bouncer.
Frieze Sculpture Park: Elmgreen & Dragset

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YAREAH

David Zwirner at Frieze & Frieze Masters 2013

1x1.trans David Zwirner at Frieze & Frieze Masters 2013

Chris Ofili. Poolside (Crystal), 2012-2013. Oil on linen. 122 1/8 x 78 3/4 inches (310 x 200 cm).

David Zwirner will present a range of gallery artists at this year’s Frieze Art Fair (Booth C12). Highlights include the debut of two new paintings by Chris Ofili; works by Adel Abdessemed, whose solo exhibition at Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art in Doha, Qatar is on view through January; a painting and works on paper by Tomma Abts; a recent large-scale photograph by Stan Douglas; a concrete and steel sculpture by Isa Genzken, who is the subject of a major retrospective at The Museum of Modern Art in New York opening in November; a painting by Neo Rauch; a selection of works on paper by Raymond Pettibon, whose show To Wit is currently on view at David Zwirner, New York; large-scale photograms by Thomas Ruff; a new painting by Lisa Yuskavage; photographs by Christopher Williams, whose first American museum solo exhibition will open in 2014 at The Art Institute of Chicago and will travel to The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and a new work by Michael Riedel, made especially for the fair and installed on-site by the artist.

Also featured are new works by the Colombian-born, London-based artist, Oscar Murillo, who recently joined the gallery. He is also part of the fair’s Sculpture Park presentation which takes place in Regent’s Park. There he will debut social anomalies from a factory (2013), a sculpture comprised of a series of stainless steel fruit crates. The artist currently has a solo show at the South London Gallery, where he has also created a unique “lottery ticket” project, and winners will be chosen on Friday, October 18.

At Frieze Masters (Booth F11), David Zwirner will present key works by a selection of gallery artists and estates, including Dan FlavinDonald JuddGordon Matta-ClarkJohn McCrackenFred Sandback, and Al Taylor, as well as Ad Reinhardt, whose work will be on view at the gallery’s new building on West 20th Street in New York in a show curated by Robert Storr featuring black paintings and cartoons; and early works by Yayoi Kusama, who will have her first show with David Zwirner (on West 19th Street in New York) in November, which will feature over 30 large-scale paintings and two infinity rooms. Also on view will be a seminal work by Gerhard Richter; an important painting by Martin Kippenberger along with a suite of “Hotel Drawings” by the artist from the 1980s through 1990s; a large-scale sculpture by John Chamberlain; an early Paßstück by Franz West; and a selection of early works by Bernd and Hilla Becher, Daniel Buren, Joseph Cornell, Konrad Klapheck, and Brice Marden.

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LUXURY

  • Work in progress: American artist Jennifer Rubell poses naked for a digital scanner when eight months pregnant to create a 25ft sculpture to be revealed at Frieze

Work in progress: American artist Jennifer Rubell poses naked for a digital scanner when eight months pregnant to create a 25ft sculpture to be revealed at Frieze

Picture: Jennifer Rubell c/o Stephen Friedman Gallery
  • Jennifer Rubell ‘Portrait of the Artist’ 2013
  • Jennifer Rubell ‘Portrait of the Artist’ 2013, steel-reinforced fibreglass, 257 x 719 x 285cm
    Picture: Stephen White c/o Stephen Friedman Gallery
  • Left; ‘Portrait d’homme’ self portrait by Corneille de Lyon circa 1550. Right:’Le Peintre’ self portrait by Pablo Picasso, 1967.
    Picture: c/o Richard Green Gallery, London
  • Patrick Heron, Christmas Eve, 1951
    Picture: Offer Waterman & Co

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Art Sales: Eyes of the world turn to London’s art fairs

As over £1 billion of art goes on sale at a variety of London art fairs including Frieze, Frieze Masters and PAD, Colin Gleadell picks out the highlights set to make headlines.

BY COLIN GLEADELL

OCTOBER 14, 2013 23:11

The original Frieze fair remains the big attraction, striving to enhance the visitor experience this year with less galleries, more public space, and smaller crowds through ticket restrictions

Lucio Fontana, Concetto Spaziale, Attesa, 1966. Ben Brown Fine Arts
Pierre Soulages, painting 195 x 130 cm, 1953. Applicat-Prazan

The tents are up, the stands are hung, and 350 international art dealers have been attending to last-minute niggles at London’s mega fairs – Frieze and Frieze Masters in Regent’s Park, and the Pavilion of Art & Design (PAD) in Berkeley Square – before they open this week. In addition to the £150 million of contemporary art on the auction block, they boast nearer £1 billion of art from all periods for sale.

In their wake, numerous other events for less expensive art are hoping to catch the attention. Last week, I highlighted the new 1:54 fair for African art. For serious talent-spotters, the small, select and free-entry Sunday Art Fairopposite Madame Tussaud, much favoured by cutting-edge collectors such as Anita Zabludowicz or David Roberts, is recommended.

For the streetwise, urban look, go to theMoniker Art Fair in Brick Lane, east London, which shares the cavernous Old Truman Brewery space this year with The Other Fair. For lower-priced prints and multiples by emerging and established artists, Multiplied, at Christie’s in South Kensington, is worth a trawl.

An avalanche of gallery openings includes three of the most sought-after young talent: British artist Hurvin Anderson, who fills both of Thomas Dane’s St James’s galleries with new work, and Americans Jeff Elrod at the Simon Lee gallery in Mayfair and Mark Bradford at the White Cube gallery in Bermondsey. The openings are not for buyers, though, as everything had been sold already.

The first fair to open its doors, for a select private view on Monday, PAD is perhaps more weighted towards design than art this year. But this allows the viewer space to focus on the art that is there. The modern, post-war era is best represented with an all-white Lucio Fontana painting with Ben Brown (€6 million), an architectural-looking abstract by Pierre Soulages with Galerie Applicat-Prazan (€3.5 million), and Christmas Eve, 1951, the largest early painting, 10 feet in length, by Patrick Heron ever on the market, for which London dealer Offer Waterman will ask a seven-figure sum.

Frieze Masters, which embraces the ancient and the modern, holds it private view this afternoon. Having been adjudged a success in its first year, it has attracted more exhibitors, notably Richard Green, whose range of stock has allowed him to meaningfully juxtapose pairs of still lifes, portraits and landscapes painted 400 years apart but resonating in a way that captures the spirit of the fair completely. The pairing of a 16th-century courtier by Corneille de Lyon with a late self-portrait as a courtly musketeer by Picasso, for instance, is inspired. The differential in prices (£950,000 for the de Lyon to £5.6 million for the Picasso) is not so much to do with size but the general disparity in value today between old and modern masters, says Jonathan Green.

One of Frieze Masters’ strengths is its single-artist displays. The Mnuchin Gallery from New York, for instance, is bringing an array of de Kooning paintings and sculptures priced from $1 million (£624,000) to $10 million.

Marlborough Contemporary artist Laurence Kavanagh is a fan of the late Victor Pasmore, so he has curated a display of Pasmore’s work (£10,000 to £100,000).

The original Frieze fair for new art, though, remains the big attraction, striving to enhance the visitor experience this year with less galleries, more public space, and smaller crowds through ticket restrictions. A new, child-friendly element seems to have crept in, with paintball machines making splattered paintings, a show curated by children who were given thousands of pounds to spend, and a multimedia playground for children and adults among the sponsored projects.

Bound to attract attention will be a self-portrait sculpture by US artist Jennifer Rubell, who posed naked for a digital scanner when eight months pregnant, reclining like the Velázquez Rockeby Venus. The scans have now been translated into a massive 25ft figure from which the womb has been removed leaving a cavity large enough for an adult to nestle in. The $200,000 interactive fibreglass sculpture, made in an edition of three, will occupy all of the Stephen Friedman gallery stand.

There might be a rush to the Spruth Magers stand for a new striped-wool work by Rosemarie Trockel, priced at €200,000. Trockel’s recent London show, with prices from €80,000 to €180,000, was a sell-out. But then again, with American debt suddenly threatening to destabilise the global economy, there might be no rush at all.

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ULTRALIVE

Frieze London 2013 | What’s New This Year

BRIEFING

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14th October 2013

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Tara Pahari
cut11 Frieze London 2013 | Whats New This YearFrieze Art Fair 2012 ©Frieze London

Albert Oehlen I 24 2011photo  def image Frieze London 2013 | Whats New This Year

Albert Oehlen, ‘I 24’ (2011),Courtesy: Albert Oehlen & Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin

Frieze Art Fair is kicking off on Wednesday (VIP Day) including a new curator, sponsor, fair design, and of course some new participating galleries.

geers skull Frieze London 2013 | Whats New This Year
Kendell Geers, ‘Country of my skull’ (2010), Goodman Gallery

Probably the most noticeable change this year is the layout of the art fair. Working with architects Carmody Groarke, Frieze London has been made over to give more space for visitors. This will make it much easier to view the featured artworks in comfort and enjoy the fair as much as possible.

Curating the fair this year will be Nicola Lees, who was also on the judging panel at this year’s Emdash Award. Lees has worked for the past five years as Senior Curator of Public Programmes at the Serpentine Gallery in London. She is taking over the role from Sarah McCrory who curated the fair from 2009-2012.

A new and exciting associate sponsor is joining Frieze – Alexander McQueen, who have always been committed to promoting contemporary art. Jonathan Akeroyd, CEO of Alexander McQueen remarked on the sponsorship: ‘Frieze brings together the most exciting galleries from around the globe and Alexander McQueen supports and shares their vision in making contemporary art more accessible and engaging for the public.’

Frieze is notoriously hard for new galleries to get involved with, so it’s a great honour for those who’ve managed it this year: Marian Goodman (New York); Galerie Max Hetzler (Berlin); Goodman Gallery (Johannesburg); Maccarone (New York); Overduin and Kite (Los Angeles); and Rodeo (Istanbul).

Richard Phillips Sasha II 2012 Frieze London 2013 | Whats New This Year

Richard Phillips, ‘Sasha II’ (2012), Courtesy: Richard Phillips & Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin © Richard Phillips

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BRITISH VOGUE

BLOGS

Portrait Of An Artist

  • 15 OCTOBER 2013
  • VOGUE
Day 2: Pilvi Takala

It’s the stuff of satire. An artist awarded a prestigious art prize by vowing to give her winnings to a group of strangers so that they can produce the work. Even better, the strangers should be aged between eight and 12. Better still, no one has any control as to what they might do with the £7,000 given them.

Yet that’s exactly what the creators of the Frieze Foundation’s Emdash Award decided to do when they gave the annual prize to artist Pilvi Takala earlier this summer, thus placing one of the art fair’s biggest site-specific commissions into the hands of a youth centre from Bow. The announcement may have raised a few eyebrows, but the fruit of Takala’s project, The Committee, is officially unveiled this week.

Takala, a slight 32-year-old with an asymmetric blonde fringe and the softest of voices, has a certain childishness about her that perhaps lessens the surprise of her commitment to the project. Originally from Finland, Takala splits her time between Amsterdam and Istanbul, and is known for an almost guerrilla approach to art that has found her gently shaking up “normal” codes of behaviour, using secretly filmed footage, hired actors and a lot of role play. In one of her earliest works, The Trainee, she got a job at Deloitte in Helsinki, only to film herself sitting motionless at her desk for a month. In Bag Lady, she wandered around a shopping precinct in Berlin with a transparent bag laden with cash to gauge how people would treat her: with caution, it transpired.

For her, the Emdash award has been a chance to steer a group of children towards a joint enterprise that could be both empowering and outside their normal artistic experience. “Of course, if they just wanted to buy several thousand pounds’ worth of balloons and fill a room with them, that would be fine,” she insisted when it was suggested that eight year olds might not be the most responsible curators on earth. “Or they might decide to put all the money towards buying a piece of work and hanging it up. And that would be fine, if that’s what they wanted to do. But you would hope, with a bit of encouragement in a workshop environment, and within a group, that they would realise they had more freedom.”

So far, so terribly liberal arts. But there’s something rather brilliant in hearing Takala’s earliest interviews with the young team tasked with the project. “We couldn’t buy a house or a building,” explains young Kacey, “because we’d have to share it… and besides, we wouldn’t have enough money.” Another little boy tells her that he’ll “spend the money on a holiday to Jamaica”. A third suggests buying a giant skip and making a swimming pool.

So, what they did spend it on? The children will reveal all this Saturday. In the meantime,  you can follow the countdown at The-committee.org.

Written by Jo Ellison

Day One: Cyprien Gaillard

The nomadic French artist Cyprien Gaillard makes a well-timed debut tomorrow as his first London solo show, From Wings to Fins, opens its doors a day before the VIP launch of Frieze Art Fair. With Miuccia Prada, Phoebe Philo and François Pinault on the guestlist of friends and supporters attending this evening’s private view, the unveiling is set to be much more than a warm-up act where critics and collectors are concerned. At just 33, Gaillard arrives fresh from his large-scale exhibition at MoMA’s PS1 gallery in his current hometown, New York – a show that saw him fast-tracked from talented émigré to bankable favourite of the NY art establishment.

Getting up to meet me, he is anything but straight-faced – the famous birthmark that drifts over his right cheek is set within a suntanned complexion. But if the tagline “retrospective” or the attention that hangs over his conspicuously good looks had begun to get on his nerves, this latest smaller show shifts the focus back on to all-new works.

“Come and have a look at this” – he leads me, still smiling, into the semi-private attic room and taps the eyepiece of an antique telescope. I find myself on tiptoe, spying on an empty bottle of rum planted atop the neighbouring office building, almost the unwitting participant in a magician’s trick.

Downstairs, Gaillard’s not-so-everyday observations (spreads of retroNational Geographic magazines assembled into 3D tension collages) are displayed alongside paintings by the deceased painter Morris Louis, whose stained canvasses dominate the elegant shop front of the Dover Street space. His admiration for Louis’ home city of Baltimore and paint-pouring technique lay the common ground for this posthumous co-habitation: the American worked on bended knee to penetrate untreated canvases with streams of colour, while the Frenchman’s fieldwork saw him crouched at road level on Baltimore’s deserted streets, taking rubbings of drain covers.

This is nevertheless a Cyprien Gaillard show. “From the street you will be able to see this” – he peels the dustsheets off a life-size replica of spiked fencing used to ward off trespassers he “acquired – no, saved” from the wreckage of the Trinity Square car park in Gateshead. I’m elbowed with a reminder that the original piece played a starring role in the 1971 film Get Carter, which is typical of Gaillard’s talent for monkeying around the overlooked corners of the civilized world in the process of producing serious work. On another wall is a further clue to his current favourite place – a photograph of a dilapidated bench, dedicated to “BALTIMORE. The Greatest City in America”. Pulling the doors closed on the old-fashioned lift, he tells me through the metal gate that he is, however, “happiest on the road”, which will only add to the excitement surroundingFrom Wings to Fins. Catch Cyprien Gaillard while he is in town.

Cyprien Gaillard, “From Wings to Fins”, October 15 to November 16, 2013 at Sprüeth Magers London, Spruethmagers.com

Written by Julia Hobbs

==

ARTSY EDITORIAL

17,237 Followers

With Stephen Shore talking, Meredith Monk performing, and Ken Okiishi paintballing, this year’s Frieze London is not to be missed. In its 11th edition, Frieze London gathers 150 galleries and works by over 1,000 contemporary artists in Regent’s Park. This year promises a new, more spacious layout and an exciting programme of site-specific installations, talks, films and the nearby Sculpture Park.

1. What? When? Where? How?

Frieze London is an art fair dedicated to contemporary art with a special emphasis on living artists. With a prime location in London’s Regent’s Park, the fair takes place October 17 through Sunday, October 20, 2013. Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance online or by phone. Buy your tickets here. If you plan to visit both Frieze London and Frieze Masters, save by purchasing a combined ticket.

2. Main, Focus, and Frame

While the fair is limited to contemporary art, it’s split further into three sections: a main section with traditional gallery booths and two additional sections that are more limited in scope. Focus includes galleries that have opened since 2001 and have proposed a project specifically for this year’s fair.Frame includes galleries that have been open for under eight years, who will dedicate their booths to solo artist presentations.

3. Alexander McQueen joins Frieze team!

While 2013 marks the tenth year of sponsorship by Deutsche Bank, Frieze’s official sponsor, this year Frieze London engaged a new associate sponsor, Alexander McQueen. As part of the sponsorship London’s Alexander McQueen stores will house exhibitions of contemporary art curated by gallery owner and director, Sadie Coles. (Hear from Coles herself about the project here.)

4. Frieze food

Frieze London offers a variety of fine and informal dining options at the fair site. Formal sit-down options include:Arnold & Henderson’s Rochelle Canteen, where guests can enjoy breakfast lunch and dinner as well as a full bar and wine list; Mark Hix, which offers classic British fare and signature dishes as well as oysters and Mark’s own smoked salmon;Caravan, new to the fair, offers fresh, seasonal options and a brunch menu.

Informal and to-go options include: Gail Bakery for coffee, pastries, sandwiches, and salads; La Grotta Ices for ice cream made from fresh, local ingredients in artist-inspired flavors;Moshi Moshi for sushi; Coming Soon Coffee for you art fair caffeine fix. Additionally, Pizza PilgrimsPitt Cue, and Yum Bun will be on hand for all comfort food cravings.

5. Frieze Projects

Seven Frieze Projects, specially commissioned works to be included in the fair, have been assigned to seven artists, and will be presented together within Frieze London. The projects are curated by 2013 Frieze London curator Nicola Lees. The projects include:

Andreas AngelidakisAngelidakis was commissioned to create a custom pavilion to house the 2013 Frieze Project activities. Angelidakis’s construction, an island-like platform within the fair space, provides partitions and display surfaces for fellow projects. The work is an assemblage of white block-like modules, at once paying homage to and deconstructing the white cube.

Gerry BibbyAfter discovering fragments of oyster shells in the earth at Regent’s Park the Australian artist chose to investigate London’s historical relationship with oysters through a series of performances. A pre-fair performance includes art fair workers eating oysters and leaving piles of oyster shells scattered around the exhibition space. A second performance will last the duration of the fair’s second day and involves collaboration with If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution, an Amsterdam-based performance platform.

Rivane NeuenschwanderNeuenschwander contributes motivated by her previous work The Conversation(2010). Inspired by Francis Ford Coppola’s 1974 psychological thriller of the same name, the 2010 iteration included a gallery space filled with spying devices. Learn morehere.

Ken OkiishiOkiishi’s project is contained within a space with acrylic glass, transparent walls within which he will employ paintballing to create a series of abstract paintings. Additionally, his project will include a participatory performance during the fair, involving humans and robots.

Lili Reynaud-DewarReynaud-Dewar’s project coincides with her commitment to only create bedroom pieces in 2013; thus she presents a bedroom installation. She will examine the works of writers who use their own lives as the subject of their work, including Guillaume Dustan’s Dans Ma Chambre (In My Room, 1996).

Josef StrauJosef Strau presents a new series of “Letter Tunnels,” the artist’s interactive letter-shaped structures. Fair-goers are invited to sit on and crawl into the tunnels, where they will encounter audio-, text-, and object-based installations.

Family Space: Angelo PlessasFor his Frieze Project, Greek artist Angelo Plessas has designed the fair’s Family Space, a first for the fair. The space, titled “The Temple of Play”, is a free, creative playground which will include a schedule of programming including games, performances, and screenings.

6. The Emdash Award: Pilvi TakalaThe Emdash Award funds an emerging artist from outside the UK to create a custom project for Frieze London each year. Finnish artist Pilvi Takala, the winner of this year’s Emdash Award, chose to involve a group of children in the planning and execution of her project. After selecting several children around the age of 12, Takala will put together workshops during the three months before the fair where they will devise a plan for the project. The artists hopes to demonstrate the potential for children to work collaboratively and as equals. (Learn more inthis interview with Takala.)

7. Frieze Talks

A daily schedule of lectures, panels, and discussions are presented, covering a variety of relevant issues. This year’s talks include:

Sexuality, Politics and ProtestFriday 18 October: 1.30pm

Neil Bartlett (Theatre Director, Author and Performer, Brighton), Marlene McCarty (Artist, New York), Zanele Muholi (Photographer, Johannesburg), Chair: Jennifer Kabat (Writer, New York)

Participants discuss the impact and legacy of ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power), Gran Fury (artist/activist group) and queer activism, on contemporary art today, 20 years since their beginnings.

Stephen Shore in conversation with David CampanySaturday 19 October: 5pm

Stephen Shore, known for his photographs of Warhol’s Factory, spent his career experimenting with color photography, beginning at a time when it was frowned upon by the art world. Shore discusses the trajectory of his work over the past 40 years with David Campany (Writer, Curator and Artist, London).

Jérôme Bel in conversation with Catherine WoodSunday 20 October: 1pm

Choreographer Jérôme Bel joins Catherine Wood (Curator of Contemporary Art and Performance, Tate Modern, London) to discuss the potential for curating within his work, particularly his dOCUMENTA(13) piece Disabled Theater, which was performed by professional actors with learning disabilities.

See the full list of talks here.

8. Meredith Monk

MacArthur “Genius” Award winner Meredith Monk has been performing interdisciplinary works of music, theater, and dance since the mid-1960s. On October 15th at 8pm Frieze presents Meredith Monk with Katie Geissinger in Concert, at Cecil Sharp House. Monk’s first performance in London in nine years, she will perform with Geissinger, whom she’s been touring with since 1990. In addition, Monk will give a talk at the fair on Thursday, October 17, at 5pm to discuss her inventive performance work and her investigations into the human voice.

9. Frieze Film

Frieze offers an exclusive programme of five new artist films, which are co-curated by Nicola Lees (Frieze Foundation) and Victoria Brooks (EMPAC). Artists presenting films this year are Petra CortrightPeter GidalPatricia Lennox-Boyd,Oraib Toukan and Erika Vogt. Accompanying the films are a think-tank and a panel discussion to consider the commissioning of artist films.

10. Sculpture Park

A short walk from the fair is the outdoor Sculpture Park, which is free and open to the public. Also including works from Frieze Masters, this year’s Park, curated by Clare Lilley, Director of Yorkshire Sculpture Park, features contemporary and historical sculpture, including new works by both established and emerging artists. Included are sculptures byMatt Calderwood, Helen Chadwick, Alice ChannerJudy ChicagoMarilá Dardot, Elmgreen & DragsetGimhongsok,Jeppe Hein, Amar Kanwar, Joan MiróOscar MurilloPeter PeriJaume PlensaNorbert PrangenbergYinka Shonibare,David ShrigleyTakisBernar VenetRachel Whiteread, andRichard Woods.

Photograph by Lyndon Douglas, courtesy of Lyndon Douglas/ Frieze; Commissioned and produced by Frieze Foundation for Frieze Projects 2012, Frieze London 2012, photograph by Polly Braden Courtesy of Polly Braden/ Frieze, photograph by Polly Braden, courtesy of Polly Braden/ Frieze; Frieze Talks 2012, Frieze London, photograph by Polly Braden, courtesy of Polly Braden/ Frieze.

Explore Artsy’s Frieze London and Frieze Masters features and follow our editorial coverage of the fairs.

4 LIKES

Chris OfiliUntitled (Afronude), 2006

Rana BegumNo.461, 2013

Alex KatzBlizzard 2, 2005

Shinro OhtakeRetina #13 (Purple Haze 4), 1989 -90
=================

ARTSY EDITORIAL

17,237 Followers

With Stephen Shore talking, Meredith Monk performing, and Ken Okiishi paintballing, this year’s Frieze London is not to be missed. In its 11th edition, Frieze London gathers 150 galleries and works by over 1,000 contemporary artists in Regent’s Park. This year promises a new, more spacious layout and an exciting programme of site-specific installations, talks, films and the nearby Sculpture Park.

1. What? When? Where? How?

Frieze London is an art fair dedicated to contemporary art with a special emphasis on living artists. With a prime location in London’s Regent’s Park, the fair takes place October 17 through Sunday, October 20, 2013. Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance online or by phone. Buy your tickets here. If you plan to visit both Frieze London and Frieze Masters, save by purchasing a combined ticket.

2. Main, Focus, and Frame

While the fair is limited to contemporary art, it’s split further into three sections: a main section with traditional gallery booths and two additional sections that are more limited in scope. Focus includes galleries that have opened since 2001 and have proposed a project specifically for this year’s fair.Frame includes galleries that have been open for under eight years, who will dedicate their booths to solo artist presentations.

3. Alexander McQueen joins Frieze team!

While 2013 marks the tenth year of sponsorship by Deutsche Bank, Frieze’s official sponsor, this year Frieze London engaged a new associate sponsor, Alexander McQueen. As part of the sponsorship London’s Alexander McQueen stores will house exhibitions of contemporary art curated by gallery owner and director, Sadie Coles. (Hear from Coles herself about the project here.)

4. Frieze food

Frieze London offers a variety of fine and informal dining options at the fair site. Formal sit-down options include:Arnold & Henderson’s Rochelle Canteen, where guests can enjoy breakfast lunch and dinner as well as a full bar and wine list; Mark Hix, which offers classic British fare and signature dishes as well as oysters and Mark’s own smoked salmon;Caravan, new to the fair, offers fresh, seasonal options and a brunch menu.

Informal and to-go options include: Gail Bakery for coffee, pastries, sandwiches, and salads; La Grotta Ices for ice cream made from fresh, local ingredients in artist-inspired flavors;Moshi Moshi for sushi; Coming Soon Coffee for you art fair caffeine fix. Additionally, Pizza PilgrimsPitt Cue, and Yum Bun will be on hand for all comfort food cravings.

5. Frieze Projects

Seven Frieze Projects, specially commissioned works to be included in the fair, have been assigned to seven artists, and will be presented together within Frieze London. The projects are curated by 2013 Frieze London curator Nicola Lees. The projects include:

Andreas AngelidakisAngelidakis was commissioned to create a custom pavilion to house the 2013 Frieze Project activities. Angelidakis’s construction, an island-like platform within the fair space, provides partitions and display surfaces for fellow projects. The work is an assemblage of white block-like modules, at once paying homage to and deconstructing the white cube.

Gerry BibbyAfter discovering fragments of oyster shells in the earth at Regent’s Park the Australian artist chose to investigate London’s historical relationship with oysters through a series of performances. A pre-fair performance includes art fair workers eating oysters and leaving piles of oyster shells scattered around the exhibition space. A second performance will last the duration of the fair’s second day and involves collaboration with If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want to Be Part of Your Revolution, an Amsterdam-based performance platform.

Rivane NeuenschwanderNeuenschwander contributes motivated by her previous work The Conversation(2010). Inspired by Francis Ford Coppola’s 1974 psychological thriller of the same name, the 2010 iteration included a gallery space filled with spying devices. Learn morehere.

Ken OkiishiOkiishi’s project is contained within a space with acrylic glass, transparent walls within which he will employ paintballing to create a series of abstract paintings. Additionally, his project will include a participatory performance during the fair, involving humans and robots.

Lili Reynaud-DewarReynaud-Dewar’s project coincides with her commitment to only create bedroom pieces in 2013; thus she presents a bedroom installation. She will examine the works of writers who use their own lives as the subject of their work, including Guillaume Dustan’s Dans Ma Chambre (In My Room, 1996).

Josef StrauJosef Strau presents a new series of “Letter Tunnels,” the artist’s interactive letter-shaped structures. Fair-goers are invited to sit on and crawl into the tunnels, where they will encounter audio-, text-, and object-based installations.

Family Space: Angelo PlessasFor his Frieze Project, Greek artist Angelo Plessas has designed the fair’s Family Space, a first for the fair. The space, titled “The Temple of Play”, is a free, creative playground which will include a schedule of programming including games, performances, and screenings.

6. The Emdash Award: Pilvi TakalaThe Emdash Award funds an emerging artist from outside the UK to create a custom project for Frieze London each year. Finnish artist Pilvi Takala, the winner of this year’s Emdash Award, chose to involve a group of children in the planning and execution of her project. After selecting several children around the age of 12, Takala will put together workshops during the three months before the fair where they will devise a plan for the project. The artists hopes to demonstrate the potential for children to work collaboratively and as equals. (Learn more inthis interview with Takala.)

7. Frieze Talks

A daily schedule of lectures, panels, and discussions are presented, covering a variety of relevant issues. This year’s talks include:

Sexuality, Politics and ProtestFriday 18 October: 1.30pm

Neil Bartlett (Theatre Director, Author and Performer, Brighton), Marlene McCarty (Artist, New York), Zanele Muholi (Photographer, Johannesburg), Chair: Jennifer Kabat (Writer, New York)

Participants discuss the impact and legacy of ACT UP (AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power), Gran Fury (artist/activist group) and queer activism, on contemporary art today, 20 years since their beginnings.

Stephen Shore in conversation with David CampanySaturday 19 October: 5pm

Stephen Shore, known for his photographs of Warhol’s Factory, spent his career experimenting with color photography, beginning at a time when it was frowned upon by the art world. Shore discusses the trajectory of his work over the past 40 years with David Campany (Writer, Curator and Artist, London).

Jérôme Bel in conversation with Catherine WoodSunday 20 October: 1pm

Choreographer Jérôme Bel joins Catherine Wood (Curator of Contemporary Art and Performance, Tate Modern, London) to discuss the potential for curating within his work, particularly his dOCUMENTA(13) piece Disabled Theater, which was performed by professional actors with learning disabilities.

See the full list of talks here.

8. Meredith Monk

MacArthur “Genius” Award winner Meredith Monk has been performing interdisciplinary works of music, theater, and dance since the mid-1960s. On October 15th at 8pm Frieze presents Meredith Monk with Katie Geissinger in Concert, at Cecil Sharp House. Monk’s first performance in London in nine years, she will perform with Geissinger, whom she’s been touring with since 1990. In addition, Monk will give a talk at the fair on Thursday, October 17, at 5pm to discuss her inventive performance work and her investigations into the human voice.

9. Frieze Film

Frieze offers an exclusive programme of five new artist films, which are co-curated by Nicola Lees (Frieze Foundation) and Victoria Brooks (EMPAC). Artists presenting films this year are Petra CortrightPeter GidalPatricia Lennox-Boyd,Oraib Toukan and Erika Vogt. Accompanying the films are a think-tank and a panel discussion to consider the commissioning of artist films.

10. Sculpture Park

A short walk from the fair is the outdoor Sculpture Park, which is free and open to the public. Also including works from Frieze Masters, this year’s Park, curated by Clare Lilley, Director of Yorkshire Sculpture Park, features contemporary and historical sculpture, including new works by both established and emerging artists. Included are sculptures byMatt Calderwood, Helen Chadwick, Alice ChannerJudy ChicagoMarilá Dardot, Elmgreen & DragsetGimhongsok,Jeppe Hein, Amar Kanwar, Joan MiróOscar MurilloPeter PeriJaume PlensaNorbert PrangenbergYinka Shonibare,David ShrigleyTakisBernar VenetRachel Whiteread, andRichard Woods.

Photograph by Lyndon Douglas, courtesy of Lyndon Douglas/ Frieze; Commissioned and produced by Frieze Foundation for Frieze Projects 2012, Frieze London 2012, photograph by Polly Braden Courtesy of Polly Braden/ Frieze, photograph by Polly Braden, courtesy of Polly Braden/ Frieze; Frieze Talks 2012, Frieze London, photograph by Polly Braden, courtesy of Polly Braden/ Frieze.

Explore Artsy’s Frieze London and Frieze Masters features and follow our editorial coverage of the fairs.

4 LIKES

Chris OfiliUntitled (Afronude), 2006

Rana BegumNo.461, 2013

Alex KatzBlizzard 2, 2005

Shinro OhtakeRetina #13 (Purple Haze 4), 1989 -90

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THE INDEPENDENT LONDON

Frieze Art Fair 2013: A frenetic feast of creative expression

This year’s Frieze Art Fair and Masters are bigger than ever – a sign of London’s growing importance as an international art centre, says Zoe Pilger

FRIDAY 11 OCTOBER 2013

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  • The night before the first Frieze Art Fair opened in London’s Regent’s Park in 2003, co-founder Matthew Slotover had a terrifying dream. Instead of a large white minimalist tent, housing dozens of international galleries, he arrived at the fair to find a big-top circus tent. Instead of clean, smooth flooring, there was grass.

The nightmare is telling because art fairs are so often referred to as circuses, garish horror shows of conspicuous consumption. This year, 152 galleries will rent a booth at Frieze and display their wares: artworks created since the year 2000, ranging from traditional paintings to crazy installations that challenge the bounds of what art can be. Rather than the cool Zen of the White Cube, the aisles of the fair are harshly lit and crowded. And the impetus is on selling.

Gallerists will hope to woo the mink-wearing, spike-heeled, yacht-owning international elite into buying a Richter or a Hockney. These oligarchs and technocrats and popstars might simply want a painting that matches their kitchen décor. In this way, the fair is a bit like a giant Ikea where nothing is remotely practical or affordable. Alternately, they might want a sculpture that speaks of the bitter existential nothingness of contemporary life. At Frieze, they can have both.

Why do people buy art? For the rush of acquisition? The pleasure of exercising good taste? Maybe. But they also want a piece of that ephemeral, fiery thing – the force that goes into the creation of a work of art, the power that separates artists from us mere mortals. Inspiration? Genius? The heavenly muse, bottled? It is the quasi-mystical quality of the work of art that persuades collectors to splash the cash. The idea of purchasing meaning rather more than another boring old Bentleys to block up the drive. Plus art can be a really good investment – not that I know from firsthand experience; I’ve never been able to afford it.

Last year, Frieze Masters opened for the first time alongside Frieze London. Frieze Masters sells work from the classical age to the year 2000, featuring 130 galleries. Unlike other fustily traditional fairs around Europe, it seeks to explore the old through the lens of the new. “No one had done this before,” Victoria Siddall, director of Frieze Masters, tells me. “It was incredibly well-received.” Indeed, it was – a huge success with an emphasis on elegant, contemporary curation. The number of galleries wishing to participate in Frieze Masters has doubled this year.

Siddall is particularly excited about a series of Matisse ink drawings from Thomas Gibson Fine Art and erotic Japanese prints from Sebastian Izzard. While the term “Masters” may evoke all that is elitist and exclusionary about art history, pointing to the dominance of dead, white, male artists, 50 per cent of the artists represented in the Spotlight section will be either female or non-Western.

Victoria Miro will be showing an enigmatic range of paintings by the American artist Alice Neel (1907-1984). Overlooked for much of her career, Neel was a committed Leftist and painted street scenes of depression-blighted New York as part of the WPA government-relief programme in the 1930s. She was an important figurative painter, lost amidst a generation of masculine Abstract Expressionists, and rediscovered by the women’s movement in the 1970s. Particularly intriguing is Mimi (1955), an oil on canvas of a woman with smudged, hollow eyes wearing a sunny yellow pencil skirt. The painting is characteristic of Neel’s ghoulish eloquence as a portraitist.

‘The Adorationof the Cage-Fighters’ (2011) by Grayson Perry‘The Adorationof the Cage-Fighters’ (2011) by Grayson Perry

LA gallery Blum and Poe will be showing a sculpture called Centred Infinity (1992) by Japanese artist Kishio Suga. Comprised of a metal cross on a wooden board splattered with blue paint, the work is characteristic of the Mono-ha art movement, which rejected the idea of creation in favour of blunt materialism. Blum and Poe will also be returning to Frieze London after an eight-year break, one of a wave of big US galleries attracted to the city’s ever-expanding art scene. Marian Goodman, doyenne of New York contemporary art, will be returning after four years, ahead of the opening of her new gallery in Mayfair’s Golden Square.

Goodman’s booth at Frieze New York earlier this year was acclaimed for housing not paintings on makeshift walls but a “constructed situation” by British-German Turner Prize nominated artist Tino Sehgal, in which a young girl recited Heidegger. Visitors were enthralled. Frieze New York opened on Randall Island for the first time last year, and was deemed a huge success. As Slotover told me on the phone, “London is being seen more and more as a very important art centre.”

But what of the recession? According to Slotover, who also founded Frieze magazine in 1991, along with his business partner Amanda Sharp, “the art world has not been as badly hit as people expected”. While sales are less extravagant than the 2006 “bubble period”, “we haven’t seen the kind of swathes of gallery closures that some people predicted”. It is the high-end galleries that have continued to prosper. Like the rest of the society, “the rich have got a lot richer”.

Fine art: Romano Alberti da San Sepolcro’s kneeling candlesticksFine art: Romano Alberti da San Sepolcro’s kneeling candlesticks

What kind of sales are they expecting this year? Siddall explains that most galleries are “very discreet” about figures. Many sales are completed post-fair. However, she can tell me that a Miró went for $20 million last year, and a Picasso for $9 million. “I love the fact that we can organise a really successful commercial event but also cultural events as well,” she says. Many of the artworks will be moving from one private collection into another so Frieze is an opportunity to see them – briefly – on display.

Indeed, most of the 60,000 visitors who go to Frieze each year are members of the public who simply want to see the art. Despite the cattle-market ambience, the fair is about creativity as much as commerce. Due to popular demand, Slotover tells me that they had to cut the number of tickets on sale this year by 25 per cent so that the fair will be less crowded. “Anyone who’s been to the fair will walk in this year and see a huge change,” he says. There is more public space. “It’s a much cleaner, more even environment.”

The phenomenon of the art fair has expanded alongside the biennale since the globalisation of the art market in the 1980s. Fairs are distinct from biennales because you can buy art on the spot. And it’s not all for oligarchs. East End gallery Limoncello will be exhibiting at Focus, a section of the fair dedicated to young galleries. While artists are often absent from fairs, allowing their dealers to do the work of selling, Jack Strange, Jesse Wine, and Sean Edwards will all be present, sitting at a round table ready to discuss their work with prospective clients.

Projects specially commissioned to run throughout the week serve to enhance the atmosphere of a festival that Slotover and Sharp intended. These include a film by exciting young LA artist Petra Cortright, member of The Nasty Nets Internet Surfing Club. Cortright’s webcam videos have been called “glitch art”: work that uses the internet and embraces the faults and failures of software. Slotover cites this kind of “post-internet art” as one of the predominant trends of new work at the fair. New York artist Patricia Lennox-Boyd’s film will focus on the use of hands in the on-screen marketing of consumer goods. It will “touching”: literally, about touch.

Like the great patrons of the Renaissance, Frieze sponsors talent in a way that can’t be viewed too cynically. Finnish artist Pilvi Takala has won this year’s Emdash Prize for emerging artists living outside the UK. Contrary to the fair’s spirit of acquisition, she handed £7,000 of the £10,000 award over to a group of 12-year-olds from a Hackney Youth Club and let them decide how to spend the money. Takala has guided the kids during workshops over the past few months. Is this a Lord of the Flies in the making? Or democratic decision-making that would put adults to shame? The results are top-secret for now, but will be revealed at the fair.

Takala is interested in “questions of value”. While the kids are mostly oblivious to the value of so much money, the fair is about “symbolic value” as much as wealth. Rather than buying and thereby possessing art as a precious object – an expensive painting or sculpture – Takala tells me that some collectors are now investing in more ephemeral art forms such as video by funding its production process. In this way, collectors feel as though they are supporting artists while eschewing more traditional notions of property. This seems to be art patronage at its best.

Frieze encourages both raw capitalism and raw art. For Slotover, “the art market allows small producers to make a living. All art exists somewhere along the spectrum of critical value and monetary value.” This is true, but where’s the conflict? “I don’t see it as a conflict at all,” he says.

Frieze Week 2013: How to make the most of it

By Alice Jones

Be adventurous

Rooftops, tunnels and car parks have all been popular venues in past Frieze weeks. This year’s non-traditional space sensation is set to be 180 The Strand, a Brutalist block-turned-arts- hub. During Frieze week it will host two ambitious shows. The Moving Museum’s Open Heart Surgery will let 31 young London artists – including James Balmforth, Shezad Dawood and Lucky PDF – run amok in 25,000sqft of former office space (12 October-15 December; themovingmuseum.com). The basement will house BRUTAL. For the past three years Steve Lazarides has staged his free street art extravaganzas in the Old Vic Tunnels, now closed. This show, featuring graffiti from Pose, photographs of LA gangs from Esteven Oriol and new work from Mark Jenkins, Antony Micallef and Doug Foster, promises to be just as dark (15-27 October; lazinc.com).

For more urban grit, Big Deal No 5, a non-profit show of up-and-coming artists will be held on Level 3 of a multi-storey car park just off Oxford St (18-20 October; deal-big.biz).

Remember there are other fairs

Frieze has seen various satellite fairs come and go over the past decade. Strarta is the young pretender for 2013 – up and running at the Saatchi Gallery and featuring 30 international galleries with work ranging from £250 to £250,000 (To 13 October; strarta.com). PAD continues to cater to the luxury end of the market with a marquee crammed full of Picassos, Kandinskys and champagne on Berkeley Square (16-20 October; pad-fairs.com). The Other Art Fair shows 100 of the best unsigned artists as selected by a panel including Yinka Shonibare, director of the Saatchi Gallery Rebecca Wilson and founder of Paradise Row, Nick Hackworth. This year it shares a venue, The Old Truman Brewery, with the urban art fair Moniker who will show work from Shepard Fairey and D*Face among others (17-20 October; theotherartfair.com; monikerartfair.com). Sunday Art Fair returns to Ambika P3 for a fourth year with a credible line-up of 22 young galleries from Berlin, London and New York (17-20 October; sunday-fair.com). Finally, The Animal Art Fair, opens a pop-up at 273 Fulham Road for all your gorilla etching and duck sculpture needs (14-19 October; animalartfair.com).

Get outside

Just a few minutes’ walk across Regent’s Park, the Frieze Sculpture Park provides a breather from the commercial and celebrity frenzy of the main fairs and, unlike them, is free to the public. This year it has work by Yinka Shonibare and David Shrigley. There will be one of Rachel Whiteread’s sheds and photo opportunities to be had with Elmgreen & Dragset’s But I’m on the Guest List, Too! an oversized VIP door that leads nowhere but is guarded by a bouncer.

Book in for a blockbuster

As usual, London’s galleries and museums are bringing out the big guns for Frieze week. Tate Modern is staging the UK’s largest Paul Klee retrospective in a decade, which will draw fans of Bauhaus and colour (16 October- 9 March 2014; tate.org.uk). Dulwich Picture Gallery is catering to the influx of foreign collectors with An American in London: Whistler and The Thames, a wide-ranging survey of the artist’s time in the city with paintings and drawings of Wapping, Chelsea and Battersea Bridge (16 October-12 January, 2014; dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk). And treasure can be found at the British Museum, whose exhibition Beyond El Dorado: Power and Gold in Ancient Colombia will dazzle with 300 exquisite objects from South America’s lost city of gold (17 October-23 March, 2014; britishmuseum.org).

Watch out for artists doing odd things

Frieze week is prime time for artists to experiment. The Chapman Brothers will showcase their musical talents with a gig at Fabric. Dinos’s audiovisual project, Luftbobler, will make its UK debut, supported by brother Jake’s band, Heimlich, and Jarvis Cocker will be manning the decks (17 October; fabriclondon.com). Aslı Çavusoglu will screen a three-part crime drama, Murder in Three Acts, that she shot at last year’s Frieze Art Fair (Delfina Foundation; to 25 October; delfinafoundation.com), while Rodney Graham will play psychedelic guitar at David Roberts Art Foundation (17 October, davidrobertsartfoundation.com). And at The Serpentine, Carsten Höller is among the artists taking part in the gallery’s 89plus Marathon, a two-day festival of ideas. As the first public event to take place in the Sackler Gallery, it’s a good excuse to have a poke around Zaha Hadid’s newest building, too (18-19 October; serpentinegallery.org).

Go for a group show

Try a group show at a commercial gallery for a fair experience in miniature. Gagosian’s The Show is Over will examine “the end of painting” via Fontana’s slashed canvases, Richter’s Grey paintings and pieces by Lichenstein, Warhol and Yves Klein (15 October-13 November; gagosian.com). Thirteen at Alan Cristea Gallery will show brand new work from an impressive stable including Gillian Ayres, Michael Craig-Martin and Julian Opie (To 9 November; alancristea.com). And at The Dairy, Ai Weiwei, Takashi Murakami, Cindy Sherman and Julian Schnabel are among the artists meditating on Aldous Huxley’s utopian last novel, Island (To 8 December; dairyartcentre.org.uk).

Get involved

Frieze week is as much about the art as it is about the art world making a spectacle of itself. As such, there are ample opportunities to become part of the art, should you wish. Stuart Semple has taken over a £14million townhouse by Regent’s Park for his show Suspend Disbelief. Among the works spread over four floors will be an installation of smiley clouds and a giant bouncy castle room (16-21 October; stuartsemple.com). At Frieze itself, several commissioned projects will be interactive, including a game of Battleships using fair visitors and a piece by Ken Okiishi that will examine the “poetic potential of paintball”. Representing Southard Reid Gallery in the Frame section of the fair, the London artist Prem Sahib will open a Soho nightclub. Elsewhere, The Other Art Fair will hold free taxidermy demonstrations for Polly Morgan wannabes (17 -19 October; theotherartfair.com).

Keep an eye on the auctions

Canny art lovers know that auction houses are the place to go for close encounters with modern masterpieces in Frieze week. Phillips is now showing £20million-worth of Kiefers, Basquiats and the like in its showroom ahead of sales on 16 and 17 October (phillips.com/auctions). Both Christie’s and Sotheby’s will stage their usual contemporary art sales next week. In addition, both have exhibitions in their brand new London venues. Christie’s will stage a show of British Pop Art, When Britain Went Pop! in the old Haunch of Venison gallery on New Bond Street (To 24 October; christies.com) while Sotheby’s has an exhibition of 12 Joseph Beuys works in its new S2 gallery on St George Street (To 15 November; sothebys.com).

Eat, drink and be merry

An art army marches on its stomach and fairs are now foodie destinations. Restaurant partners at Frieze this year include Hix and Caravan, but it is the street food offerings from Yum Bun, Pitt Cue and Pizza Pilgrims that will likely see the biggest queues. Visitors to Frieze Masters will be catered for by the more classic Locanda Locatelli. At Sunday Art Fair, the always buzzy bar will be run by Art Review, Jack Beer of Arbutus and George Howard of eatpeckham.com. Elsewhere there is an endless whirl of parties and private views to crash – this year’s glitziest is likely to be a VIP dinner at Café Royal, sponsored by fair associate, Alexander McQueen.

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ART NEWS

 The ArtLyst Power 100 List,Alternative Art Power List, ArtReview
The ArtLyst Power 100: 2013 Alternative Art Power List Unveiled - ArtLyst Article image

The ArtLyst Power 100: 2013 Alternative Art Power List Unveiled

DATE: 16 OCT 2013
London during Frieze Week is the only place to be on the planet if you are a dedicated follower of the visual arts. Every October an international herd of artists, gallerists and art professionals descend on our metropolis to feast on a wide range of art events. From ‘Blue Chip’ Frieze Masters to a pop up in an underground car-park, Frieze week is full of surprises.
Mid October is also the perfect time for us to release Artlyst’s Art PowerLyst, the alternative to ArtReview’s Power 100. Many think that AR’s list is erroneous and tired, their criteria is based on ‘sheer financial clout,’ as it is dominated by commercial gallery owners, big-buck artists, and misguided auctioneers.The ArtLyst editorial staff believe that achievement should not be compromised for the sake of the dollar, so we have created our own alternative list, instead of a Machiavellian Power List that has more in common with the Times ‘Rich List’. This year we have put together a Resourceful PowerLyst that celebrates exactly what it says on the tin – not those with the fiscal muscle to bend the artworld into whatever shape they please, but those with the creative power and ability to influence and augment the British and international art scenes through merit alone.Out go the Gagosians, the Damien Hirsts and the François Pinaults. In come the organisers of Peckham and Hackney’s finest events, the Director of Artangel, and the heads of art colleges across the country. Yes: let’s gratuitously pat ourselves on the back for the third consecutive year: here is the ArtLyst Power 100 Alternative Power List, in alphabetical order plus our curated Top 10 for 2013.Top Photo: (Left) Chris Dercon, Nicholas Serota (Right) Tino Seghal1. Tino Seghal: British-German artist of part Indian origin, based in Berlin. Exhibited at Tate Modern for the 2012 Unilever series commission. Won the Golden Lion for best artist at 2013 Venice Biennale and nominated for Turner Prize 2013.2. Chris Dercon: Director of Tate Modern since 2011 with an enthusiasm for ‘mixing it up’, formerly the director of the Haus der Kunst, Munich.3. Jeremy Deller : English conceptual, video and installation artist. Winner of the Turner Prize in 2004, represented Britain at 2013 Venice Biennale4. Hans Ulrich Obrist/ Julia Peyton-Jones: the Serpentine Gallery’s Co-directors of Exhibitions and Programmes.5. Grayson Perry: artist known for his work in ceramics, and awarded the Turner Prize in 2003,  self-curated show The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman at the British Museum 2011, received BAFTA in 2013 for his series All in the best possible Taste and will deliver this year’s Reith Lectures for Radio 46. Jenni Lomax: Director of Camden Arts Centre, led the major refurbishment of the centre that was completed in 2004.7. James Lingwood/ Michael Morris: Co-Directors of Artangel since 1991, responsible for building Artangel into a significant international commissioning and producing organisation.8. Elizabeth Neilson: Director 176 Zabludowicz Collection9. Elmgreen & Dragset:  leading contemporary artists currently exhibiting a site specific installation at the V&A10. Hannah Barry: Founder of the Hannah Barry Gallery and one of the leading people responsible for transforming Peckham into an international art centre

Artlyst Power 100 In Alphabetical Order

1. Marina Abramovic: Serbian New York-based artist, and the self-professed ‘grandmother of performance art’, who began her ground-breaking career in the early 1970s.

2. Michael Archer: Programme Director of BA Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London, art critic and freelance writer, contributing regularly to the Guardian Culture section on contemporary art from 1960 onwards.

3. Ziba Ardalan: founder and Director/Curator of Parasol Unit Foundation for Contemporary Art, a privately-funded educational charity and a not-for-profit art gallery.

4. Bill Arning: Director of the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, former curator of the List Visual Arts Centre, MIT, and a freelance writer.

5.Karen Ashton: founder and organizer Art Car Boot Fair  (new)

6. *Hannah Barry: Founder of the Hannah Barry Gallery and one of the leading people responsible for transforming Peckham into an international art centre (new)

7. Pryle Behrman: Art Critic, curator and Director of Art Projects at London Art Fair  (new)

8. Gareth Bell-Jones: Curator at Wysing Arts centre, Cambridge, has written articles for Artvehicle and Contemporary Magazine, chaired symposiums at Cafe Oto

9. Peter Blake: English pop artist, who celebrated his 80th birthday last year and continues to be a major force in the art world

10. Iwona Blazwick: Director of Art at the Whitechapel Gallery, former Head of Exhibitions and Displays at Tate Modern, and Chair of Cultural Strategy Group, London.

11.Erica Bolton: PR catalyst and organisational magician. Partner at Bolton & Quinn Ltd.

12. Trisha Brown: Postmodernist Artist, dancer and choreographer, inducted into the National Museum of Dance C.V. Whitney Hall of Fame in 2000, and awarded the National Medal for Arts in 2002.

13. Jonathan Burton: Director of London Art Fair  (new

14. Kate Bush: Head of Barbican Art Galleries, made multiple TV appearances on the subject of Art, and even been mentioned in a Harry Hill sketch.

15. Romain Chenais: French London-based art critic and independent curator, curated the first major retrospective of British filmmaker John Smith at the Royal College of Art.

16.  Billy Childish: prolific painter, poet, printer and musician. Co-founder of the Stuckist art movement. (new)

17. David Chipperfield: Modernist architect, with two buildings shortlisted for the 2007 RIBA Stirling Prize, and winning with the Museum of Modern Literature, Marbach.

18. Matthew Collings: began his career on Artscribe, before producing and presenting The Late Show for BBC, and is still involved with broadcasting on productions such as School of Saatchi and

19.Susan Collins: Slade Professor at the Slade School of Fine Art since 2010,  (new the 2010 BBC documentary ‘Renaissance Revolution’. He also lectures at the City and Guilds London School of Art.

20. Sacha Craddock: art critic and curator, Programme Director of Max Wigram gallery, curator of the Bloomberg Space, tutor at the RCA, Chair of New Contemporaries, and sat on the 2009 Turner Prize judging panel.

21. Michael Craig-Martin: Emeritus Professor of Fine Art at Goldsmiths London, previously a tutor at Goldsmiths where he fostered the talent of many of the YBAs.

22. David Crawforth & Naomi Siderfin: founders, Directors, Curators, and artists at Beaconsfield, a gallery with a vision to ‘provide a critical space for creative enquiry’, that occupies ‘a niche between the institution, the commercial and the ‘alternative’’.

23. Martin Creed: artists and musician, Turner Prize winner 2001, numerous exhibitions and projects in 2013.  Look out for his retrospective exhibition at the Hayward Gallery in 2014

24. Penelope Curtis: Director of Tate Britain with a scholarly background in British art, especially 20th-century sculpture, she was also the first exhibitions curator at Tate Liverpool when it opened in 1988. She was a judge of the Turner prize 2012.

25. Alan Davey: Chief Executive of the Arts Council, has worked in the Department of National Heritage, and as head of the Arts Division and Director of Arts and Culture in the Department of Culture, Media and Sport.

26.*Jeremy Deller : English conceptual, video and installation artist. Winner of the Turner Prize in 2004, represented Britain at 2013 Venice Biennale

27. Melissa Denes: The Guardian’s arts editor, she also writes for the New Statesman.

28. *Chris Dercon: Director of Tate Modern since 2011 with an enthusiasm for ‘mixing it up’,

29. Emily Druiff: Director of Peckham Space, one of London’s newest purpose-built public galleries, dedicated to commissioning artworks made in partnership with community groups.

30. *Elmgreen & Dragset:  leading contemporary artists currently exhibiting a site specific installation at the V&A

31.  Kate Fowle:  Chief Curator of Garage Centre for Contemporary Culture, Moscow (new)

32. James Franco: American artist, actor, and writer who balances his work as an artist with a mainstream acting career.

33. Katherine Fritsch: for her large blue cockerel Hahn/Cock currently to be seen on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square

34. Jason Gaiger: Head of the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, also a Fellow of St. Edmund Hall Oxford, previously worked as Director of Research of Art History in the Open University, and Recently published ‘Aesthetics and Painting’.

35. Ryan Gander: London-based artist, creator of the Locked Room Scenario in Shoreditch, awarded the 2010 Zurich Art prize, accompanied by an exhibition at the Haus Konstruktiv, Zurich, and winner of the 2003 Prix de Rome.

36.  David Gryn: Director Artprojx, curated moving image projects  (new)

37. Andreas Gursky: German visual artist who is known for his large scale architecture and landscape photographs

38. Zaha Hadid: architect responsible for the 2012 London Olympics Aquatics Centre, and has won the RIBA Stirling Prize twice, winning this year for the Evelyn Grace Academy, Brixton. Designed Serpentine Sackler Gallery which opened in 2013.

39.  Margaret Harrison: Feminist artist and winner of 2013 Northern Art Prize  (new)

40. Thomas Heatherwick: English designer known for his innovative use of materials, also designed the London 2012 Olympic cauldron and the ‘Borismaster’ bus launched in 2013.

41. James Hughes-Hallett: Chairman of the Courtauld Institute of Art.

42. Achim Borchardt Hume: Returns to Tate Modern as Head of Exhibitions. Previously Chief Curator at the Whitechapel Art Gallery

43. Heather Hubbs: Director of NADA art fairs  (new)

44.  Roger Hiorns: artist, 2009 Turner Prize nominee, His work Seizure currently on show at the Yorkshire Sculpture Park and Unititled series is at The Hepworth Wakefield.  (new)

45. Thomas Krens: former Director of the Guggenheim Foundation, New York, currently Senior Advisor for International Affairs, overseeing the completion of Guggenheim Abu Dhabi.

46. Yayoi Kusama: Japanese artist who had a major lifetime culmination of her work shown at Tate Modern.

47. Michael Landy: YBA most famous for the work Break Down (2001), elected a member of the Royal Academy of Arts in 2008, current Rootstein Hopkins Associate artist in residence at the National Gallery

48. Joseph La Placa: CEO All Visual Arts curator of Metamorphosis, Vanitas and The Viewing Room.

49: Nicola Lees: Curator of Frieze Foundation (new)

50. John Leighton: Director General of National Galleries of Scotland, taught Art History at Edinburgh University before moving into curating at the National Gallery, acquired the Artist’s Rooms collection for National Galleries of Scotland, and was awarded an honorary degree for services to the arts from Edinburgh University in 2009.

51. *James Lingwood/ Michael Morris: Co-Directors of Artangel since 1991, responsible for building Artangel into a significant international commissioning and producing organisation.

52. *Jenni Lomax: Director of Camden Arts Centre, led the major refurbishment of the centre that was completed in 2004.

53. Declan Long: Irish art critic, curator and lecturer. He teaches at the faculty of visual culture at the National College of Art and Design in Dublin[1] and regularly appears on Lyric FM, discussing and reviewing contemporary art.

54. Sarah Lucas: part of the Young British Artist movement that emerged in the 1990s. The subject of a current major retrospective at the Whitechapel Gallery

55. Christine Macel: Chief Curator of the Musee National d’art Moderne- Centre Pompidou, currently developing the exhibition ‘Dance your life’ which will open in November 2011, she also writes for FlashArt and Artforum.

56. Anna Maloney: Director of Hackney WickED festival (new)

57. Christian Marclay: Swiss-American visual artist and composer, most recently exhibited at the 2011 Venice Biennale where he won the Golden Lion for his piece The Clock.

58. Rebecca May-Marston: Director of Hoxton’s Limoncello gallery, and One of the Independent’s 10 gallery owners who ‘are changing – and challenging – the British art scene’.

59. Ben Moore: Artist/Curator of Art Below (new)  a London based public art enterprise, founded in 2006 using billboard space in underground stations to display artworks in London and overseas.

60. Simon Morrissey: independent curator and writer on contemporary art, who regularly talks publicly about contemporary art and curating, as well as frequently acting as a visiting tutor on a number of leading Fine Art courses at UK universities.

61. Gregor Muir: Executive Director of the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London.

62. Banksy clever street artist and art guerrilla. Nominated this year for setting up a stand in New York and selling ‘Spray Art’ for £40 a pop. Real value £20,000-£100,000 He sold 6 paintings for $420.

63. Andrew Nairne: Director of Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge, Chair of the Visual Arts and Galleries Association (VAGA), and former Director of  Modern Art Oxford.

64. *Elizabeth Neilson: Director 176 Zabludowicz Collection

65. *Hans Ulrich Obrist/ Julia Peyton-Jones: the Serpentine Gallery’s Co-directors of Exhibitions and Programmes.

66. Kirsty Ogg: curator at the Whitechapel Gallery and of the London Open, and Lecturer in Curating at Goldsmiths, University of London.

67. Yoko Ono: Japanese painter, and performance based,Director of Meltdown festival 2013

68. Sandra Penketh Director of Art Galleries National Museums Liverpool

69. Nicholas Penny, FSA a British art historian. Since Spring 2008 he has been director of the National Gallery in London.

70. *Grayson Perry: artist known for his work in ceramics, and awarded the Turner Prize in 2003,  self-curated show The Tomb of the Unknown Craftsman at the British Museum 2011, received BAFTA in 2013 for his series All in the best possible Taste and will deliver this year’s Reith Lectures for Radio 4

71. Michael Petry:  multi-media artist, writer and curator. Director of MOCA London, co-founder of the Museum of Installation,   (new)

72. Heather Phillipson: video and installation artist, 2013 exhibitions at Zabludowicz collection, BALTIC centre for Contemporary Art, Gateshead

73. Victoria Pomery: Director of Turner Contemporary since 2002, previously the Senior Curator at Tate Liverpool, has worked at the Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, Australia, and was part of the selection panel for the 2007 Ebbsfleet Landmark Project.

74:  Alan Powers: teacher, researcher, writer. Former chair of 20th century society (2007-12) and organizer of the campaign to save public art around UK. (new)

75. Elizabeth Price: video artist and winner of the 2012 Turner Prize

76. Laure Provost: filmmaker and 2013 Turner Prize nominee, Her piece Wantee was included in the Tate’s Schwitters in Britain exhibition.  (new)

77. Pussy Riot: Russian guerilla art movement, three members were imprisoned last year based on their involvement in an “anti-Putin” ‘art performance’ piece.

78. Gerhard Richter: German visual artist who specializes in abstract photorealism.

79. David Roberts: Prolific art collector in the UK, in 2008 started the ‘David Roberts Art Foundation’ to help emerging artists and young curators.

80. Ralph Rugoff: Director of the Hayward Gallery, previously Director of the Wattis Institute, best known for his curated work Just Pathetic (1990).

81. *Tino Seghal: British-German artist of partly Indian origin, based in Berlin. Exhibited at Tate Modern for the 2012 Unilever series commission. Won Golden Lion for best artist at 2013 Venice Biennale and nominated for Turner Prize 2013.

82. Nicholas Serota: Director of the Tate (1988-present) and the driving force behind the opening of the Tate Modern. Has participated on the board of The Architecture Foundation and chaired the Turner Prize jury.

83. Amanda Sharp/Matthew Slotover: founders of Frieze magazine and the Frieze Art Fair in London and New York

84. David Shrigley: British Artist known for his work in humorous cartoon style, contributes a weekly cartoon to the Guardian’s weekend paper, and has exhibited internationally including solo shows in New York, Gateshead, Barcelona and Mainz. Nominated for 2013 Turner Prize.

85. Taryn Simon: American art photographer, with a major feature show at the Tate Modern in 2011.

86. Bob and Roberta Smith: contemporary British artist operating under pseudonym, famous for painting slogan-bearing signage in support of various activist campaigns.

87. Donald Smith: CHELSEA Space Director, with the ambition to create ‘a research development centre for invited art and design professionals, providing a gallery space, library research facilities, and a platform to develop personal projects that may otherwise remain unrealised’.

88. Polly Staple: Director of London’s Chisenhale Gallery, contributing editor to Frieze, on jury panel for Max Mara Art Prize for Women  2009- 2011, and one of the Guardian’s 2010 ‘women to watch’.

89. Katherine Stout: Head of Programmes at ICA, formerly Head of Contemporary art at Tate Modern.  (new)

90. Callum Sutton; CEO Sutton PR – 2013 clients included Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art, Art Fund Prize for museums and galleries,

91. Paul Warwick Thompson: Rector of the Royal College of Art, served as Director of the Smithsonian’s National Design Museum in New York until 2009, trustee of the Victoria and Albert Museum, and a Member of the Wellcome Collection Advisory Committee at the Wellcome Trust.

92: Jeremy Till: Head of Central St Martins Art School since 2012 (new)

93. John Tusa: British arts administrator, currently the Chairman of the University of the Arts London, presented BBC 2’s Newsnight from 1980-1986, from 1995-2007 was managing director of the Barbican Arts Centre, London, and is Honorary Chairman of theartsdesk.com.

94. Christoph Vogtherr: Director of the Wallace Collection from October 2011, previously the Curator of pre-1800 pictures at the Wallace Collection.

95. Mark Wallinger: sculptor and installation artist, double Turner Prize nominee, won the Prize in 2007 for the work State Britain. Notable work includes the sculpture on the Fourth Plinth of Trafalgar Square Ecce Homo (1999). Created Labyrinth for 150th anniversary of the London Underground in 2013.

96. Ai Weiwei: Chinese contemporary artist and political activist, awarded Das Glas der Vernuft Kassel citizen award in 2010, and serving as an Artistic consultant for the 2008 Olympics Bejing National Stadium.

97. Matt Williams: Curator of exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, and co-editor of the annual publication Novel, which focuses on artists’ writing and poetry.

98.Godfrey Worsdale: Director of the BALTIC centre for contemporary art, Gateshead, responsible for hosting the Turner Prize 2011, Vice Chairman of the UK’s Visual Art and Galleries Association, and selector for the 2011 Threadneedle Prize for Painting and Sculpture.

99. Lynette Yiadom-Boakye: Exhibited Extracts and Verses at Chisenhale Gallery, nominated for 2013 Turner Prize (new)

100. Anita and Poju Zabludowicz: founded the Zabludowicz Collection in 2007, a space for exhibitions, commissions and residencies, as well as establishing the Zabludowicz Collection ‘Curatorial Open’ and ‘Testing Ground’ programmes to promote contemporary art education. She is also a key sponsor of the upcoming Sunday Art Fair.

* = Top Ten entry

Compiled by Artlyst © 2013

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MUTUAL ART

The Art Fairs of Frieze Week 2013

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Julian Hoeber, Twins #1 (Execution Changes #44, #45), 2011, Courtesy of Blum & Poe
It’s London’s turn in the great art fair cycle, and Frieze and its satellites have descended upon the British city for the eleventh year. The Carmody Groarke-designed pavilion will be even roomier this year, with wider aisles to suit visitor’s comfort and optimize the art-viewing experience. Along with the expected roster of top galleries, the fair welcomes some new seasoned faces like Blum & Poe, Marian Goodman and Maccarone. As expected, the powers behind Frieze have a world class line up of special exhibitions, film, and a sculpture park curated by Clare Lilley, Director of Programs at Yorkshire Sculpture Park, that will pair contemporary and historical pieces, giving a well-rounded presentation of modern masters like Judy Chicago, Jaume Plensa and Rachel Whiteread.
Judy Chicago, Rearrangeable Rainbow Blocks, 1965. Courtesy of Riflemaker.
Nicola Lees of the Frieze Foundation will put her newly-appointed curatorial imprint on the fair, curating both Frieze Projects and Frieze Film, for which she partners with Victoria Brooks of EMPAC (Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center) at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. This year, Frieze Projects has commissioned site specific pieces by Andreas Angelidakis, Gerry Bibby, Rivane Neueunschwander, Ken Okiishi, Angelo Plessas, Lili Reynaud-Dewar and Josepf Strau, while Frieze Film has commissioned works by Petra Cortright, Peter Gidal, Patricia Lennox-Boyd, Oraib Toukan and Erika Vogt, made during a residency at EMPAC.
Petra Cortright, vvebcam, 2007, avi file, webcam video, 1:42 min. Courtesy of Frieze.
For the collector seeking the art historical, Frieze Masters will return, with highlighted works by Pieter Breughel the Younger, Murillo, Velazquez, and modern masters like Bacon, Calder, Guston, Picasso and Pollock. There is also an incredible Masters Talks program planned with contemporary artists John Currin and Catherine Opie, whose work references the historic, whether in subject or technique, alongside conversations between the Victoria and Albert’s Director Martin Roth and Beatriz Milhazes, and the Kunsthustorisches Museums’ Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Jasper Sharp with Richard Wright.
 
Pieter Brueghel the Younger, L’Auberge St. Michel, 1619. Courtesy of De Jonckheere.
Philip Guston, Untitled (Shoe), 1968. Courtesy of McKEee Gallery.
This year Frieze will also bring its influences into the retail realm, with a partnership with fair sponsor Alexander McQueen. During the fair, the London retail stores (Bond Street and Saville Row) will feature contemporary art curated by Sadie Coles, once again merging art and fashion like the late designer did so expertly.
The exciting week will kick off on October 17, with special combination discounts for art lovers visiting both the Frieze and Frieze Masters Fairs.  And once you have had your fill at the main fair here is a selection of satellite fairs to visit, guaranteeing something for everyone, including cutting edge contemporary, street art, video art , African art, artist multiples and design.
Sunday Art Fair. Courtesy of Sunday Art Fair.
The edgy satellite fair features only 20 galleries, with an emphasis on the best of emerging art.  The feel is like a large group show, without the stereotypical booths that define an art fair (exhibitors are instead separated by tape on the floor). This year’s participants include New York’s White Columns and London’s Studio Voltaire, with a fair sponsor of ICA.
Still from Annika Larsson’s Animal in 14 movements, 2012, video, 41 minutes. Courtesy of Moving Image.
The unique fair returns to the Bargehouse to celebrate video art, including 30 single-channel videos, video sculptures and large video installations. The fair brings the issues surrounding the collecting video art to the forefront, even offering the “AV Bar,” a sort of take on the Mac Store’s Genius Bar, to answer collectors’ questions about displaying and caring for video art. This year curators, Kyle Chayka and Marina Galerpina, will indulge the self-portrait craze, with the National #Selfie Portrait Gallery, featuring short form “selfies” from 16 emerging video artists from the EU and the US.
Moniker Fair. Courtesy of Moniker Fair.
For its fourth year, the street and urban art fair will be shacking up with The Other Fair at the iconic Old Truman Brewery. Expect works by recognizable urban artists like Banksy, The London Police, D Face, Greg La Marche, Shepard Fairey and Pure Evil, plus special installations.
Delphine Lebourgeois, Deesse VIII Photo de Classe. Limited edition of 3 Giclee print finished by hand with pencils and inks. Courtesy of The Other Fair.
Also at the Old Truman Brewery on Brick Lane, The Other Fair offers collectors a chance to scoop up works by over 100 unrepresented artists. The fair fosters artists year round by offering free seminars and workshops to help them enter the art market and connect talent with buyers.
Stephen Hobbs, Pop-up Book, 2013, silkscreen book, Courtesy of David Krut Projects, Johannesburg, Cape Town & New York.
Collectors of prints, editions and multiples can find all they are looking for at the fourth edition of Multiplied. With an emphasis on art priced for every budget to bring art to everyone, Multiplied extends this mission with its charity affiliate, Vital Arts, which brings art, music and performance to hospital patients. The fair, located at Christie’s auction house in South Kensington, is free to the public and will feature live printmaking workshops and an exhibition by Graduate students of the Royal College of Art’s Print Department.
Cameron Platter. Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery.
New to Frieze Week this year, 1:54 is the first contemporary African Art Fair and brings together 17 carefully curated galleries, accompanied by an educational and artistic program curated by Koyo Kouch. 1:54 will also offer lectures, film screenings and talks, such as Hans Ulrich Obrist in conversation with Godfried Donkor, Christine Eyene in conversation with Senam Okudzeto, as well as a discussion on building an African collection of contemporary art. The 1:54 fair aims to educate visitors on the importance, context and market of African art.
PAD London. Courtesy of PAD London.
The PAD fair is designed to ask art collectors and enthusiasts to relate fine art to the same context as design, decorative arts, photography and tribal arts, encouraging visitors to use each of these elements to find their aesthetic voice by building comprehensive collections that touch on each genre. The eclectic fair offers pieces steeped in history, museum quality art works, notable photography and design furniture of the highest caliber, all set in an all encompassing, boutique style atmosphere.

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