Berlin Art Week 2013

Wow Berlin really knows how to make press coverage happen for its art scene. LA should follow Berlin’s lead in using blogs and other social media to really make the scene here more public.

Loved my trip to Berlin. Hope to return soon

Vincent Johnson

artist and writer in Los Angeles

http://www.vincentjohnsonart.com

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Wednesday, September 18, 2013 by It's time for art. Exhibition view of Tobias Zielony at Berlinische Galerie, still on view until Sept 30th
It’s time for art. Exhibition view of Tobias Zielony at Berlinische Galerie, still on view until Sept 30th

Ugh, there’s loads of arty things to do this week. To grant you an overview of what you’ll need to see when, I asked curator and writer Anna-Catharina Gebbers to send me an list of to-dos:

Of course I can’t wait to see what Gelatin will do at Schinkel Pavillon. Calling it Gelatin in discursive construction versus communicative destruction you’ll “see the sculptures happening”. Starting on the 18th of September there is a program on each of the four evenings of Berlin Art Week with different guests like Anetta Mona Chisa & Lucia Tkacova, Michael Sailstorfer, Thomas Zipp, Will Benedict, Simon Denny, Lucie Stahl, Michele di Menna, Karl Holmqvist, Gerwald Rockenschraub, Anna Ly Sing or Douglas Gordon a.o.

Schinkel Pavillon, Oberwallstraße 1, 10117 Berlin Mitte. Tel +49.30.208 86 444. info@schinkelpavillon.de.
Performances: Sept 18th 17:00 – 21:00, Sept 19th 18:00 – 22:00, Sept 20st 17:00 – 21:00, Sept 21st 15:00 – 19:00

Show Real Drama by Keren Cytter, picture: Hebbel am Ufer

Show Real Drama by Keren Cytter, picture: Hebbel am Ufer

On 19th of September there will be two not-to-be-missed performances happening at HAU: Alexandra Bachzetsis will show A Piece Danced Alone that comprises an open ended suite of solos that are casually transmitted from one performer to the other. The difference between the two slowly dissolves and, like in a hall of mirrors, Doppelgängers appear.
Keren Cytter will Show Real Drama evolving around two actors working on their show reel. Not having managed to find any work since graduating, the two decide to direct and produce their own demo tape out of their favourite scenes. The performance shows their personal relationships and memories but also reality and faked drama.
Also happening at HAU, but two days later: The Unanswered Question. Iskele 2. The performance program is part of the survey exhibition, co-ordinated by Neuer Berliner Kunstverein and the art space Tanas. The project takes the political and cultural upheavals in Turkey and the neighboring regions as an occasion to ask how the modernisation process of the last twenty years has affected aesthetic practice. Artists and musicians from various generations will research the materiality of the in-between spaces – of transit – thus working out new perspectives on the relationship between viewer, work and space.

Alexandra Bachzetsis, A Piece Danced Alone
Thu 19.09.2013, 20:00 + Fri 20.09.2013, 20:00 / HAU3, Tempelhofer Ufer 10 / 10963 Berlin
Keren Cytter, Show Real Drama
Thu 19.09.2013, 21:30 + Sat 21.09.2013, 20:00 / HAU2: Hallesches Ufer 32 / 10963 Berlin
The Unanswered Question. Iskele 2.
Performances on Sat 21.09.2013, 17:00 / HAU1, Stresemannstr. 29 / 10963 Berlin

Or you postpone your visit to the performance of Alexandra Bachzetsis to the 20th and Keren Cytter to the 21st of September – because on the 19th of September there will be also the opening of After Year Zero. Geografien der Kollaboration seit 1945 at Haus der Kulturen der Welt. The exhibition, and a series of films, talks, plus a conference will focus on the intertwining of European and African history over the course of decolonization. Furthermore it deals with the attempts to fundamentally transform the parameters of the colonial modern area during this period. It might become the most important exhibition in Berlin this year.

Haus der Kulturen der Welt, John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10, 10557 Berlin. info@hkw.de. Tel. +49 30 39 78 71 75.
Opening hours: Wed – Mon 11:00 – 19:00; from 19th September 2013

Sebastian Stumpf: Puddles, 2013, Video projection. Thomas Fischer Galerie

Sebastian Stumpf: Puddles, 2013, Video projection. Thomas Fischer Galerie

Thomas Fischer will present the works of performance artist Sebastian Stumpf in his gallery. The strength of performance art is usually considered to reside in its immediacy and the bodily presence of the performers. But the effect of the camera’s presence on actions, performances and happenings brings a dimension of spectacle to the event as well as underlining its voyeuristic character – especially if the artist is performing for the camera only. Like Vito Acconci or Chris Burden, Sebastian Stumpf is often an actor without an audience. Be it in the White Cube or in the public space. And just like Valie Export Sebastian Stumpf is interrupting urban chaos with his sculptural bodily presence. His investigations of space are interferences in the public, post-urban, liquefied spaces of our age and as unexpected gestures within the social fabric. By having them filmed, his interventions put the nature of the images into question, and explore the perception and the voyeuristic, but blinded by overburdening view.

Sebastian Stumpf: Unforeseen
Galerie Thomas Fischer, Potsdamer Straße 77-87, Haus H, 10785 Berlin. Tel: +49 30 74 78 03 85. Email: mail@galeriethomasfischer.de. Opening hours Tues – Sat: 11.00 – 18.00.

During the Berlin Art Week I’ll obviously be visiting my own project: In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida. It brings together time based media works by Pia Greschner, Lisa Junghanss, Sophie Kluge, Jennis Li Cheng Tien, and Nicole Wermers. I’ve compiled the works of these five awesome ladies by starting from the rhizomatically growing and thus highly timely legend of the Garden of Eden. As a topos the Garden of Eden is as much a locus amoenus as a locus terribilis. As myth it is an ambiguous concept. And as a historic site, it yet hasn‘t found a conclusively clarified geographical location. Appropriately the title goes back to a misinterpretation. And it’s even a subject to several legends how and when the line „In a Garden of Eden“ became the mondegreen „In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida“ in the eponymous song by the band Iron Butterfly. In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida is part of the group exhibition Utopia which will take place at Senatsreservenspeicher, and is organized by my dear friend Tjorg Douglas Beer. Two years after starting my 4-hours-exhibitions at Anna-Catharina Gebbers | Bibliothekswohnung ––which I call something that is more a performance of an exhibition than an exhibition itself–– in 2008 Tjorg Douglas Beer and Meike Cruse started their infamous One-Night-Exhibitions at Forgotten Bar Project which were performative by their own means.

Galerie Utopia Berlin/Athens at Senatsreservenspeicher Berlin, Cuvrystrasse 3-4, 10997 Berlin-Kreuzberg. mail@galerieutopia.com. Opening Hours: September 19 – September 21 2013 noon – 2 pm

If you are still not tired:
Douglas Gordon’s film installation Silence, Exile, Deceit (2013) will be presented at Volksbühne. The ‘industrial pantomime’ was shot on location in Essen, using blinding light and the deepest darkness, sounds and visual impressions, Gordon poses the question of “who has a say” —- artist, performer, or spectator?

Volksbühne Berlin, 3rd floor, Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, Volksbühne am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, 10178 Berlin; September 21, 18:00

Plus: Mathew gallery is presenting a performance by London and Hamburg based artist Than Hussein Clark with music from Philip Venables that will happen on 19 September at 7.30 PM sharp!

Mathew, Schaperstrasse 12, 10719 Berlin, Germany, Tel: +49 30 21021921
Hours: Thu – Sat / 13 – 18 & by appointment

But most important: DON’T FORGET – SUNDAY 22nd of September IS ELECTION DAY! It’s a privilege. People died for the right to vote.

***
Anna-Catharina Gebbers is a writer and curator, who lives and works in Berlin.
Upcoming exhibitions: IN-A-GADDA-DA-VIDA as part of UTOPIA organized by Tjorg Douglas Beer: 18-21 September 2013, Galerie Utopia Berlin/Athens at Senatsreservenspeicher Berlin, Cuvrystrasse 3-4, 10997 Berlin-Kreuzberg; CHRISTOPH SCHLINGENSIEF, curated by Klaus Biesenbach, Anna-Catharina Gebbers, Susanne Pfeffer: 1.12.13–19.1.14, KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Auguststr. 69 D-10117 Berlin; from March 2014, MoMAPS1, New York

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FLASH ART

THE BERLIN ART WEEK

The European art fair calendar got off to a brisk start with Berlin Art Week, which ran from September 17 through 22, and included, among many other events, abc–art berlin contemporary, Preview Berlin and Berliner Liste, which all ran from September 19 through 22.
Haris Epaminonda, Chapters, 2013.
Installation view at Hamburger Banhof.Mixed media. Courtesy Rodeo Gallery Istanbul, Massimo Minini, Brescia. Photo: David von Becker
For its sixth edition, abc–art berlin contemporary was held in the Kreuzberg district. While in past editions the selection of works was based upon a general theme, this year each gallery was invited to present its own project, a choice that stressed curatorial concepts and the figure of the artist — aspects that are increasingly obscured by commercial considerations.
Mariana Castillo Deball, Installation view at Hamburger Bahnhof, 2013. Courtesy the artist. Photo: David von Becker
Not only does this approach allows the artist greater visibility, but, indeed, many exhibiting artists were spotted among the booths talking to visitors. Especially notable was an appearance by artist Hermann Nitsch.
Simon Denny, All you need is data: the DLD 2012 Conference REDUX, 2013.
Installation view at Hamburger Banhof. Courtesy the artist, Galerie Buchholz Berlin / Köln, Petzel Gallery New York

Photo: David von Becker

In partnership with BMW Cultural Engagement, abc featured 133 galleries from 22 different countries. Approximately half of these came from Berlin (including Arndt, BQ, Galerie Guido W. Baudach, Capitain Petzel, Chert and Bischoff Projects) and the rest from cities such as Dubai (Carbon 12), New York, Los Angeles, London, Vienna and Rome.
In addition to the booths — unconventionally organized in three halls specifically designed by a Berlin-based architecture studio — a section entitled “Upcoming Exhibitions” was held in the entrance hall, which presented 14 international exhibition projects that took place every two hours throughout the duration of abc.
A variety of other events at a range of venues took place during Berlin Art Week. The program included a group exhibition at the Schinkel Pavilion by Gelatin working in collaboration with 12 Berlin-based artists working under the collective name “Anna Ly Sing,” as well as site-specific installations, discussions and special openings at the Boros and Hoffman collections. During this year’s Berlin Art Week, particular attention was paid to painting through the initiative “Painting Forever,” a show located in four venues: Berlinische Galerie, Deutsche Bank KunstHalle, KW Institute for Contemporary Art and Nationalgalerie -Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. For the launch of this cooperative project, initiated by the Berlin Senate, the four institutions chose painting as the focal point for their first year of collaboration, which is to be continued in the future.
In its attempt to promote contemporary art, the BMW Cultural Engagement Group also supports the National Gallery Prize for Young Art. Specially created works by a number of nominated artists are presented in a group show at the Hamburger Bahnhof. A jury chooses the winner from the shortlist. The award is intended as a symbol in recognition of the increasing significance of Germany’s young artists on the international cultural scene. This year the jury was comprised of Okwui Enwezor (Haus der Kunst, Munich), Luis Pérez-Oramas (Museum of Modern Art, New York), Kitty Scott (Art Gallery of Ontario), Udo Kittelmann and Gabriele Knapstein (both Nationalgalerie, Berlin), who awarded the prize to Mariana Castillo Deball, who was shortlisted alongside Simon Denny, Kerstin Brätsch and Haris Epaminonda.
The jury stated: “We looked and thought carefully about the work of the four nominees. We appreciated the seriousness of purpose and conceptual clarity of each project. The Jury based its decision specifically on each contribution to the exhibition along with the arc of the artists’ development. Mariana Castillo Deball’s work convinced us as it hinges on the significance of the world of contact. Her work explores the discourses of archaeology, anthropology and museology through the perspective of the long durée. Mariana Castillo Deball’s concerns with history have contemporary resonance.”
For more information about Berlin Art Week visit:

http://www.artberlincontemporary.com

http://www.hamburgerbahnhof.de

http://www.bmwgroup.com/culture/

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BERLIN ART WEEK: Postkarten aus Kunst

Joseph W. Huber, ‘The Importance of MAIL ART in the history of art’ (detail) 1982, Mail Art card on photo paper, 10.5 x 14.7 cm. Guillermo Deisler Collection, Academy of Arts, Berlin © VG Bild-Kunst , Bonn 2013

by Carmen Ansaldo

One of Berlin city’s most established and innovative interdisciplinary spaces decided to quiet the tone of Berlin Art Week with their official contribution to the festival, opting to exhibit their vast collection of mail art.

Arte Postale showcases the Akademie der Kunst’s collection of postcards, letters, collages and other small scale works on paper, dating from the start of the 60s until today. It may come as a surprise to some that the chic warehouse-cum-gallery space of the Akademie would commit to the development of such a low-fi collection in the first place, as the space has always prided itself on providing exposure to new and challenging artwork in cutting-edge mediums. However, this collection does a lot to provide context and perspective on the turbulent modern history of Berlin, whilst also maintaining contemporary relevance through the constant additions to the collection that the Akademie receives from contemporary artists around the globe.

Arte Postale includes over 700 works ranging from the more conventional interpretations of mail art – postcards and letters – to more interpretive entries such as posters, pamphlets, scrolls and collages. Some of the big names found within this massive collection include Joseph Beuys, Dieter Roth, Daniel Spoerri, James Lee Byars, Andy Warhol, Emil Schumacher and Jonathan Messe. The exhibition demonstrates a dynamic duality between these historically contextualised works (mainly correspondence between artists and galleries during the GDR years) and newer works which are concerned less with the specificity of time and place.

Instead, they prioritise the material qualities of the posted medium, examining its unique ability to facilitate expression between individuals situated across borders and nations. These newer works are part of a separate project within the exhibition which includes over 330 participating artists from 38 countries. Each artist has responded to co-curators Klaus Staeck and Lutz Wohlrab’s request for small scale works to be sent to the Akademie addressing the movement of mail art generally and the Akademie as an institution more specifically. Titled Academy/Akademie, the project ranges from established artists to hobbyists and enthusiasts (Daniel Dellafiora and Radio Ozone being the Australian participants) and the diversity of interpretations on display is indicative of this range.

Historical and material implications aside, what does an exhibition of mail art in 2013 set out to achieve? The press release for Arte Postale declares that the exhibition, “… illustrates clearly the extent of the need of and the pleasure gained by analogue networking and ‘small format’ artistic activity — even today in the age of the internet.” For sure, the quality and commitment demonstrated by the Akademie’s collection presents a strong argument for the importance of mail art as a historical art movement, a success which is to the credit of curator Rosa von der Schulenburg. The exhibition’s affirmation of the ‘pleasure’ that is to be found in tactile medias and small format articles is evident in the care that has been taken to ensure the works are allocated adequate space and lighting. (Most works are installed in a museum-like set of table-top glass cases.) However, what is not apparent is Arte Postale’s ambition to affirm the current ‘need’ for mail art, if we can say that such an ambition could be fulfilled in the first place. Although the project of Academy/Akademie ensures that the collection will remain a work in progress into the foreseeable future, the mail art on display clearly functions as a gesture of homage to an art historical movement well past its prime. It does not, and possibly cannot, provide a continued sense of mail art’s original urgency and importance within the new context of contemporary art today. This is particularly the case when it is presented to the viewer more as an artifact than as a counterpart of the technological mediums of choice that now define the contemporary arts.

Read as an act of homage, of historic documentation, and a testimony of the ability for personal narratives to stretch over international boarders, Arte Postale is a powerful and unavoidably heartwarming affair. The involvement of new artists exhibiting alongside the correspondence between modernist artists creates a sort of call-and-response from future to past that is both meaningful and delightful. However, the original urgency and purpose of the movement was not able to be sustained in the contemporary examples of mail art on display. For this reason, the gesture of Arte Postale becomes a nostalgic and sentimental one. Although it does not fulfill every purpose ascribed to it by its curator, an exhibition which provides you with such an experience surely cannot be considered an unsuccessful one.

http://www.berlinartweek.de/en/program/berlin-art-week.html

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AQNB – berlin

Berlin Art Week reviewed

A performative turn away from a focus on traditional arts.

transmedia
graphic
reviews
Berlin Art Week header
by Jane Parker on 24/09/2013

Berlin Art Week is a collaboration between eleven of Berlin’s leading contemporary art institutions, this year running from September 17 to 22. With four of them joining up this year to present painting exhibitions under the Painting Forever! banner some may have felt that the event was skewed towards the more traditional arts. But elsewhere in the program it went the other way. At the art fair, abc – art berlin contemporary, painted canvases were a rare sight, with time-based and site-specific works rising to the fore. Moreover, the addition of ten new institutions to the program, the majority of them project spaces, allowed for a more diverse and experimental program, a noticeable trend being an abundance of performance-based works. With many of the major institutions simply opening their six-month long exhibition projects, performance allowed the art week to be what it purports –a temporary and experience based affair.

abc continues to maintain that it is not strictly an art fair, despite being an event which invites galleries to present artists. Its main point-of-difference lies in its sprawling interior architecture (which dispenses with traditional white booths), and encourages larger installations and site-specific works. This year more than ever, galleries seemed to respond to abc’s more experimental format, exhibiting more ephemeral applications. One such was Laura Lima’s work, presented byBrazil’s A Gentil Carioca) where a hand reached from underneath a white wall, struggling to grasp some keys placed just out of reach. Occasional passers-by kicking the keys closer only to have them thrown-away again, the hand continuing its fruitless search.

Emi Hariyama, Marcus Doering, Lower Order Ethics and Peter Kirn, 'Thresholds' (2013) @ Collegium Hungaricum Berlin.

Emi Hariyama, Marcus Doering, Lower Order Ethics and Peter Kirn, ‘Thresholds’ (2013) @ Collegium Hungaricum Berlin.

Meanwhile, performance was incorporated into the format with independent Parisian art-space Shanaynay curating an area where selected galleries staged two-hour-long exhibitions. While these shows ranged from more literal executions (a woman wielding a bull whip), to behind-the-scenes preparation (walls being painted), the nature of the display and its fixed duration, rendered all of these exhibitions performance. While this idea of a performed exhibition is not a new concept, it was a very fitting one for abc, which is seems to be encouraging and attracting time-based arts and innovative modes of display.

While abc displayed the exhibition-as-performance, Schinkel Pavillon, a space for contemporary sculpture, displayed the studio-as-performance. Over four-days the Viennese relational art group, Gelitin, created sculptures based on their conversations with twelve Berlin-based artists. Each evening the group exhibited a kind of open-studio where they would create the sculptures. Kicking aside some paint-splattered balloons, I entered the space late on a Saturday to see a stage strewn with garbage, half-formed sculptures and random objects. Minimal synth music played while a monotonous voice read from a German text. One artist was making hot chocolate, while another, a manly looking guy wearing plastic boobs, drilled together some broken chairs. A fourth, wearing an apron and a “Josef Boys” t-shirt, attempted to bring some order to the space, picking up rubbish and arranging objects. After Thursday’s performance, BpigsAdela Lovric wrote: “if somebody wanted to make a cliché portrait of Art, it would look pretty much like Schinkel Pavillon yesterday.” But this total cliché also seemed more than a little tongue-in-cheek. Being performed was a kind of ultimate sculptors studio, a hedonistic space allowing maximal experimentation. And with the knowledge that Gelatin were making art-works based on other artists’ ideas, their sculptures seemed more performance and parody than original creation.

Gelatin, 'Stop Anna Ly Sing' (2013), performance view @ Schinkel Pavillon.

Gelatin, ‘Stop Anna Ly Sing’ (2013), performance view @ Schinkel Pavillon.

Worlds away from the tactile messiness at Schinkel, was the slicker and technologically savvy performance curated by MOMENTUM; a platform for time-based art in Berlin. In an interdisciplinary performance at the Collegium Hungaricum Berlin, ballet dancer Emi Hariyama interacted with projected light and digital animation created by Dr. Marcus Doering. In the first and most refined section, a shifting outline of Hariyama was projected onto her body, giving her a flickering neon halo. This trace then proliferated, so that various digital bodies moved in increasing delay from the original figure. As the performer moved through a variety of interactive effects, the performance began to feel like a series of increasingly novel tricks, each based on the premise that the dancer was triggering changes in the digital imagery. So while there were moments of innovation, it also fulfilled every expectation that might arise from the description “multimedia contemporary dance”.

The most pure forms of performance art were at a survey of Turkish artists, presented as part of a longer running project by the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) and TANAS. Held inside the decadent Art Nouveau theatre of HAU 1, performances seemed to address conventions of classical theatre and performance. Ayşe Erkmen’s work ‘7 Times’ (2013), saw a large metal bar, the kind that would usually hold large set backdrops, lowered and raised seven times. The sound of the bar dropping managed to convey the promise of a scene-change without ever delivering one. Annika Kahrs’ work ‘Strings’ (2010), entailed members of a classical string quartet changing places during the performance, forcing each musician to play instruments they had little proficiency in.

Across the different forms of performance art at Berlin Art Week, there seemed to be a preference for cross-disciplinary works. In two instances, performance was treated as a condition that could be applied to something else: abc “performed” exhibitions, Schinkel Pavillon “performed” an artists studio. MOMENTUM presented the most obvious coming-together of different mediums, while pieces for n.b.k and TANAS used contemporary performance to reinterpret more traditional theatrical forms. As performance art becomes increasingly included in the kind of big art events that it used to be largely excluded from, there seems to be a tendency to show it in reference to other art forms. So while this year’s performance inclusions at Berlin Art Week proved interesting, it could also be presented as a stand-alone medium. **

Berlin Art Week runs across venues in Berlin, Germany, annually in September.Header image: Emi Hariyama, Marcus Doering, Lower Order Ethics and Peter Kirn, ‘Thresholds’ (2013) @ Collegium Hungaricum Berlin. Photo by Jessyca Hutchens.

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THE CREATOR’S PROJECT

The Best Of Berlin Art Week

By Emily Wasik — Sep 23 2013
Attending Berlin Art Week for the first time can be like stumbling down a rabbit-hole into a sensory overloaded wonderland. Tweedledee and Tweedledum are the gallery curators, the hookah-smoking caterpillar is the chilled-out Berliner vibe that encompasses you, and the grinning Cheshire cat is your face after a day at the booths.
“Berlin Art Week actually already happens 52 times a year,” said Moritz van Dülmen of Kulturprojekte Berlin, the organization behind the event. Attracting thousands of designers, photographers, illustrators, filmmakers, and musicians annually, Berlin has truly become a year-round muse for the artistically inclined.
With Berlin Art Week the already-electrifying city shifts into overdrive, uniting many of the disparate elements that form Berlin’s art world in an unprecedented, all-embracing approach across the city’s creative spectrum. With 21 venues over six days from Sept 17-22, attendees definitely needed Alice’s “DRINK ME” potion to heighten their senses to conquer the whole soiree.
Below we’ve culled some of our favorite mind-expanding exhibitions from this fantastic labyrinth of a festival:
Suspension by Artistdock
Suspension © Mathias Wasik
Some of the works’ relationships to suspension were literal, like Max Strasser’s paintings of UFOs, Charlotte Perrin’s video Plongeur with a diver frozen in a continuous and abstract loop, or Pablo Mercado’s Tea and Madeleine, Tribute to Marcel Proust, which reconstructed a memory of tea time with a chair, table, and teacups suspended in mid-air, reminiscent of a Matrix fight scene. García Sánchez instead explored “political limbo” with his series of drawings The Fall of Capitalism and Chansook Choi’s The Promised Land presented a place isolated in its own perfection.
Suspension © Mathias Wasik
The Berlin World Improvement Machine by Friedrich von Borries
Berlin World Improvement Machine © Mathias Wasik
What if while Shakespeare was wondering “To be or not to be?” and Newton formulating universal gravitation in the 17th century, innovators in old Berlin were conspiring a top-secret plan to build a machine to better the world?
Spurring a discussion about the role of art and science in relation to the improvement of our present-day world, architect and curator Friedrich von Borries tracked the secret components of this (real) machine and created a curatorial intervention in 16 Berlin museums during Berlin Art Week. Based on research amassed at the Academy of Arts (1696), the Academy of Sciences (1700) and later the Royal Museums of Berlin (from 1830), von Borries created a treasure map marking approximately 70 artworks and artifacts that together unfold to improve the world.
In addition, the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum Für Gegenwart Berlin presented a 15-meter high model of the World Improvement Machine in its inner courtyard.
How Not to be Seen: A F*cking Didactic Educational .MOV File by Hito Steyerl
How Not To Be Seen – Film Still © Hito Steyerl, courtesy of Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam
Thanks to Hito Steyerl’s instructional “How Not to be Seen” video, invisibility cloaks and camouflage gear have been rendered futile. Featured at the Venice Biennale and Berlinerische Galerie during Berlin Art Week, the film informs viewers how to remain invisible in an age of image proliferation. One suggestion is to digitally camouflage oneself (to demonstrate, Steyerl smears green paint on her face and is chroma-keyed into invisibility), while another suggested tactic is to be smaller than the size of a pixel.
Worth Noting:
Preview Berlin Art Fair: As a tribute to 18-year-old Miami street artist Israel Hernández, a.k.a. Reefa, who was tasered to death by a police officer, Gallerist Pablo Gehr of G&G Fine Art constructed an installation of works at Preview Berlin Art Fair, including two works by internationally famed street artist Banksy.
Painting Forever!: Leading Berlin contemporary art institutions Berlinische Galerie, Deutsche Bank KunstHalle and KW Institute for Contemporary Art and Nationalgalerie joined forces to bring painting into focus at the artiest time of the year in Berlin.
Hush Hush: One of the multiple alter-egos of American artist Christopher Kline, Hush Hush describes himself as a ‘self-styled hit-machine’, considering every track a single and defiantly creating pop music which is not, in fact, very popular.
To the West: 13 OSTKREUZ photographers explored the urbanization of Charlottenburg, making a visual inventory through photographs of this urban microcosm that oscillates between clichés and reality, rundown buildings and splendor, commerce and science, decline and new beginnings.
To The West © OSTREUZ
Top image courtesy of Oana Popa

By Emily Wasik

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ART BERLIN

BERLIN ART WEEK Guide. Openings & Parties on Tuesday

Berlin Art Week

BERLIN ART WEEK Guide. Openings & Parties on Tuesday

Berlin Art Week is kicking off with a hell lot of gallery openings on Tuesday. We give you the full list and some recommendations for exhibitions, artists and parties.

Berlin Art Week

Berlin Art Week kicks off today and that means six days and nights full of art openings, art fairs such as abc Art Berlin Contemporary, Berliner Liste or Preview, exhibitions in the most important museums, arty people everywhere in every outfit, dinner and drinks receptions and a hell lot of parties. Berlin Art Week is a new born child for the “Kunstherbst Berlin” and those of you who want to know more about the idea behind and mission, just see our Berlin Art Week article we did some days ago.

Tuesday: Gallery Openings Day at Berlin Art Week

Almost all big galleries will have their openings on this Tuesday night from usually 6 to 9 pm. We give you the whole list of all major openings but took the freedom to point out some galleries and a very nice PARTEY.

Sylvie Fleury

SYLVIE FLEURY @ MEHDI CHOUAKRI // 6–9 PM   

One of Berlin’s most known gallerists Mehdi Chouakri will show new works from famous Sylvie Fleury. Her show wears the Do Not Think Of The Color Blue For Thirty Seconds. If you want to know more let Mehdi explain you everything around it at this night.

Mehdi Chouakri // Edison Höfe // Invalidenstrasse 117, entrance Schlegelstrasse

Roman LiskaThe artist Roman Liska at DUVE BERLIN

DUVE  BERLIN // NEW GALLERY SPACE IN XBERG // 7-9 PM

Alexander Duve just moved from Invalidenstrasse to Kreuzberg, opening up his new gallery space not far from Johann König’s church that will be in place next fall. Expect a cool crowd, a white box style room and a special abc | art berlin contemporary viewing: the group show called *Not Safe For Work*  featuring Chris Ucco, Dan Shaw-Town, Ed Fornieles, Nazafarin Lotfi, Wyatt Kahn and Roman Liska we just met during our summer at NYC’s Lower East Side.

DUVE BERLIN // Gitschinerstrasse 94/94a, Entrance D, 2 floor

Thorsten Passfeld

GALLERY ALEXANDER LEVY SHOWS THORSTEN PASSFELD // 6-9 PM

We do like to watch how gallery alexander levy is making its way from a young gallery to an established art spot in town with a very talented eye for young artists. Don’t miss the opening of the exhibition Heiss, Billig, Kurz / Hot Cheap Short presenting new wall objects by Thorsten Passfeld (*1975). His works are playful, ironic, humorous and critical as well as human and light. Alexander Levy call it “with painstaking care” how Passfeld creates visual universes comprising of plywood, cupboard walls and old floorboards, which he retrieves from buildings about to be demolished or old roof structures.

gallery alexander levy //  Rudi-Dutschke-Strasse 26

Kingsize

SPECIAL ARTIST NIGHT @ KING SIZE  BAR // PARTY // FROM 10 PM 

Alexander Duve and Alex Levy are also known to be amazing hosts of crazy parties and we are enchanted to be part of a special artist night at our favorite bar.

ON THE WHEELS OF STEEL: Gottfried and 2Blessed
ON THE BAR: Bronson & his kids
ON THE TÜR: beautiful Jette
ON THE DANCEFLOOR: you!

King Size Bar // Friedrichstr 1 // 10 pm

For the ambitious: all openings on Tuesday // 6-9 pm

  • Arndt /  Natee Utarit – Illustration of the Crisis
  • ART CLAIMS IMPULSE / Dazzling & Haunted‘ i
  • Galerie Guido W. Baudach Charlottenburg / Thomas Helbig – The Mental Life of Savages
  • Bourouina Gallery / Bart Domburg – From Tree to Tree
  • carlier | gebauer / Sebastian Diaz Morales – Ficcionario, Kailiang Yan
  • Galerie Crone / Justin Almquist Work (Ground Floor), FORT Leck (First Floor)
  • Eigen + Art Lab / Birgit Brenner, artist talk 7 pm
  • Konrad Fischer Galerie  /Alan Charlton – Triangle Paintings; Julian Fickler (Fischer Oben)
  • Johnen Galerie / Rodney Graham – Canadian Humourist
  • Galerie Kamm / Opening: Invited by Rosa: Simone Gilges, Sebastian Hammwöhner, Lisa Herfeldt, Judith Hopf, Dani Jakob, Imri Kahn, Daniel Laufer, Alexandra Müller, Annette Ruenzler, Jens Ullrich a.o. Ein Zimmer Put together by Annette Ruenzler, Charlie Hammond The Sweats
  • Klemm´s / Alexej Meschtschanow – Der Morgen heller als der Tag
  • Kraupa / Tuskany Slavs and Tatars – Not Moscow Not Mecca
  • Krobath / Hannes Böck – Las Encantadas
  • Galerie Gebr. Lehmann / Slawomir Elsner – Séancen
  • MD72 / Florian Hecker
  • Galerie Opdahl / Chosil Kil – Hyde Park
  • PSM / Florian Hecker
  • Esther Schipper / Angela Bulloch – ABCDLP 002 – Short Big Drama by George van Dam for Short Big Yellow Drawing Machine by Angela Bulloch (Showroom)
  • Schleicher/Lange / Kristof Kintera – Demon of the Growth
  • Sommer & Kohl / Brot und Salz – Barba, Berendes, Billy, Bonvicini, Büttner, Hol, Kacem, Ligorio, Melsheimer, Oerlemans, Perret, Uzelman. At the new premises Kurfürstenstr. 13/14
  • Veneklasen Werner / Miyoko Ito
  • Żak / Branicka Stanisław Dróżdż – Forgetting

Stay tuned for our upcoming BERLIN ART WEEK guide to the best parties!

Autor: Eva Kaczor

Berlin Art Week Guide

Berlin Art Week: Highlights to see

A daily guide to Berlin Art Week: abc, Preview and Berliner Liste. Galleries, openings, artist and parties we recommend to see.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th 

BERLINER LISTE / OPENING & PARTY

The main event for Wednesday is the opening of Berliner Liste at 6pm, Kraftwerk Berlin. Promoting the discovery of ever emerging new talent, Berliner Liste will bring together over 130 galleries from 30 different countries. The span of media used by all of the participating artists is vast, ranging from photography and sound installations to performance, prints and painting – a topic further explored by complementary program Painting Forever! An unmissable OPENING PARTY will follow after the initial viewing at techno mecca Tresor.

B.AGL / INDEPENDENT ART FAIR / MUSE BERLIN ART FESTIVAL

If you’re looking for something a little less polished then don’t miss independent art fair B.AGL at Postbahnhof, or the eclectic program of workshops and film screenings as part of a.muse berlin’s BAW art festival.

abc

THURSDAY 19th September

ABC & PREVIEW BERLIN / OPENING

One of, if not the most busiest days in the Berlin Art Week calendar, Thursday marks the opening of renowned art fairs abc and Preview Berlin. Preview will start with the ‘Preview Berlin Lounge’ consisting of music and performance around 6pm.

The abc opening will be accompanied by a BBQ at 4pm. Held at Station-Berlin, art berlin contemporary or abc will focus more upon providing international galleries with space to represent a single artist.

C/O BERLIN / OPEN AIR EXHIBITION IN NEW HOME

The wonderful photography institution C/O Berlin will also be holding an open air exhibition both in and about the ever changing district of Charlottenburg, their new home, with a show by 13 photographers from the city’s well known school of photography OSTKREUZ.

FRIDAY 20th September

DOKU.ARTS 

Take some time out of your busy art week schedule to enjoy a documentary from three week film festival DOKU.ARTS. Focussing on archival material – much like that of Berlinerpool – Friday evening’s offerings will include the documentary ‘Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer’ at 9pm.

MISS READ

Also promising is the ‘Miss Read’ art publishing book fair happening as part of abc from 12-7pm.

Made: Symphonie Cinétique

SATURDAY  21st SEPTEMBER 

MADE ART SPACE / POETIC PERFORMANCE

End the art week with your last chance to see the amazing kinetic composition ‘Symphonie Cinétique – The Poetry of Motion’ in one of Berlin’s most rich in quality and innovation art spaces – MADE. An intense collaboration between the so talented Icelandic composer Olafur Arnalds and Joachim Sauter, the co-owner of art & com who is an expert in kinetic art. Symphonie Cinétique explores the poetic synergy of music and mo­tion in space, creating a goosebump experience (believe us – we have shivered already twice at the official opening this summer!).

ST. AGNES CHURCH / OPENING JEPPE HEIN

An equally rewarding way to end Berlin Art Week is with the opening of ‘YOU’, an exhibition by Jeppe Hein at the amazing church cum gallery space St. Agnes.

Tents / SLOW portfolio viewing for curators // Vernissage & archive event 

BLAIN|SOUTHERN // OPENING OF FRANCESCO CLEMENTE

Find a moment of calm amongst the openings with the latest vernissage at Berlin’s Blain|Southern. Italian artist Francesco Clemente will present his first Berlin based solo show in six years, the exhibition featuring three ‘large scale canvas tents’, perhaps the perfect place for a moment of quiet reflection.

SLOW PORTFOLIO VIEWING FOR CURATORS

Also taking it slow will be the Berlinerpool SLOW portfolio viewing for curators from 3 until 6pm, allowing a lucky few the chance to delve into their extensive physical artist archive files.

Autor: Marie J. Burrows

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By Arsalan Mohammad

Photo Gallery: Berlin Art Week Kicks Off
DPA

Berlin Art Week, an initiative designed to corral and celebrate the city’s sprawling art scene, returns this week for the second time with an expanded portfolio of events. Following a rocky few years in the Berlin art world, does it herald a new era of unity?

“Berlin Art Week actually already happens 52 times a year,” points out Moritz van Dülmen, the cheerful CEO of Kulturprojekte Berlin, the organization behind the event.

With the start of the second annual Berlin Art Week, the scene is shifting into...

DPA

With the start of the second annual Berlin Art Week, the scene is shifting into overdrive for an “extra-special week, absolutely devoted to art,” according to Moritz van Dülmen, the CEO of Kulturprojekte Berlin, the organization behind the state-driven event. Here, a visitor walks past one of the works in the event’s “Painting Forever!” exhibition, which is spread across four venues and features more than 100 artists.

With an ambitious program featuring new gallery exhibitions, parties, talks,...

DPA

With an ambitious program featuring new gallery exhibitions, parties, talks, projects and presentations — it also unites many of the disparate elements that form Berlin’s art world. Given the fragmented, often chaotic character of the city’s cultural front, this is no mean feat.

Here, visitors to part of the "Painting Forever!" exhibition check out a work...

DPA

Here, visitors to part of the “Painting Forever!” exhibition check out a work by artist Martin Eder. “It’s very important to promote Berlin’s special art scene to all people,” says van Dülmen.

The flagship event brings four major institutions -- the Berlin State Museums,...

Thomas Eugster

The flagship event brings four major institutions — the Berlin State Museums, Berlinische Galerie, Deutsche Bank KunstHalle and the KW Institute for Contemporary Art — together for the first time, to present the exhibition “Painting Forever!” Here, an installation at the KW Institute for Contemporary Art.

There is also a program of collaborative events with 11 "projects" around town,...

Berlin Art Week/ Foto: Oana Popa

There is also a program of collaborative events with 11 “projects” around town, curated by a jury including (from left to right)journalist Claudia Wahjudi, former director of Cologne’s Museum Ludwig, Kaspar König, and artist Monica Bonvicini, who between them have overseen the week’s chosen “Project Rooms.”

These "Project Rooms" are where the Art Week has played an ace, ensuring that...

after the butcher

These “Project Rooms” are where the Art Week has played an ace, ensuring that much-loved smaller venues ranging from Autocenter, Schinkel Pavilion and After The Butcher (shown here) to Galerie M and Kustverein Tiergarten | Galerie Nord, all get a share of the support and ultimately, the spotlight.

Established self-funded art spaces like Kustverein Tiergarten, shown here, are...

Kunstverein Tiergarten/ Galerie Nord

Established self-funded art spaces like Kustverein Tiergarten, shown here, are an important part of the city’s art scene and will be highlighted by the “Project Rooms.”

Bringing investors to the Berlin art scene is an important aim of the event....

Berlin Art Week/ Foto: Oana Popa

Bringing investors to the Berlin art scene is an important aim of the event. “We’ve invited them,” van Dülmen says of investors. “Now we are just hoping they come!” Here, representatives of the many Berlin institutions taking part in Berlin Art Week.

ANZEIGE

This is something of an understatement. Berlin’s rambunctious art world continues to attract artists and art lovers from around the world, people who are enticed by the city’s quixotic allure and more prosaically, the legendary cheap rents and ample exhibition space. And as events such as the annual Gallery Weekend continue to demonstrate, there is no shortage of people wanting to absorb the city’s culture.But with the start of the second annual Berlin Art Week on Tuesday, the scene is shifting into overdrive for what van Dülmen calls an “extra-special week, absolutely devoted to art.” A state-driven initiative, co-funded by the Berlin Senate’s Administration for Economics, Technology and Research, the city’s Chancellery for Cultural Affairs and Deutsche Bank, the event cleverly harnesses the usual September buzz generated by the simultaneous openings of Art Berlin Contemporary (ABC) and Preview Berlin art fairs. With its own ambitious program featuring new gallery exhibitions, parties, talks, projects and presentations — it also unites many of the disparate elements that form Berlin’s art world. Given the fragmented, often chaotic character of the city’s cultural front, this is no mean feat.

Berlin Art Week’s strategy is an unprecedented, all-embracing approach across the city’s creative spectrum. The flagship event brings four major institutions — the Berlin State Museums, Berlinische Galerie, Deutsche Bank KunstHalle and the KW Institute for Contemporary Art — together for the first time, to present the exhibition “Painting Forever!” The show, spread over the four venues, presents over 100 painters, ranging from big names such as Martin Eder, Anselm Reyle and Franz Ackermann to lesser-known talents including Nader Ahriman and Matthew Antezzo, all arranged in a grand curatorial narrative that is bound by the city’s illustrious art history.

Filling a Void

There is also a program of collaborative events with 11 “projects” around town, curated by a jury including journalist Claudia Wahjudi, former director of Cologne’s Museum Ludwig, Kaspar König, and artist Monica Bonvicini, who between them have overseen the week’s chosen “Project Rooms.” This is where the Art Week has played an ace, ensuring that much-loved smaller venues all get a share of the support and ultimately, the spotlight. There will also be awards — the “Preis der Nationalgalerie für junge Kunst,” given to young artists working in Germany, and an award from the Senate Chancellery for Cultural Affairs for “artistic projects and initiatives in the realm of fine art.” And in the background, major exhibitions are opening at partner institutions across the city.

“Berlin Art Week is for Berliners and also guests,” says van Dülmen. “We’re trying to follow in the footsteps of the former Art Forum, holding this date in the international art calendar and getting collectors to Berlin. But it’s very important to promote Berlin’s special art scene to all people.”

The seeds of Berlin Art Week were sown with the demise of the city’s “official” art fair, the Art Forum, in 2011. Riven with internal wrangling and an ongoing lack of any serious collector base in the city, the fair collapsed, leaving a void reluctantly filled by ABC and Preview art fairs, both of which expanded rapidly, in their individual ways, to step into the breach.

A few missteps on the part of the city followed in the confused aftermath of Art Forum’s implosion. Probably the most notable was “Based in Berlin,” which was also administered by van Dülmen’s Kulturprojekte. An inchoate and controversial semi-biennale in 2011, it was intended with naive optimism by city officials to provide a platform for expression ahead of the opening of a Berlin Kunsthalle art exhibition center, which never happened. The failure of the €1.6 million ($2.14 million) Based in Berlin project — partly attributed at the time to the fact that so few of its figureheads actually were — prompted the debate that would eventually springboard into Berlin Art Week. The factionalized Berlin art scene was embroiled in a fierce discussion about what to do next and specifically, how contemporary artists in the city could see a bit more of the estimated €1 billion ($1.3 billion) in annual state and federal culture spending, most of which is channeled into high-profile theatre, opera and museums.

Fighting for Art

The debate over art funding is never far from any discussion over Berlin’s art future, as city officials realized last year when the “K2” summit of representatives from across the art spectrum was assembled to give their perspectives to the Berlin Chancellery of Cultural Affairs. Berlin artist, curator and critic Thomas Eller, who has worked in institutional administration, reiterates that point today.

“Berlin Art Week, in principle, is a good idea. Pooling resources and talent never hurts! People in cities like London have been doing this for a long time,” he says. “Any money that Berlin spends on supporting the distribution of art on a local, national and international level is money spent wisely.” But this still isn’t enough, he adds, saying that more strategic thinking is needed by cultural politicians. “Like many others I feel that what Berlin has right now could just go away if the situation stays as destitute as it is right now for most participants in the art world.”

For Berlin Art Week, the all-important funding and support means that partnering institutions can begin to move forward and develop programs unhindered by the specter of limited budgets and grants. And this focus on sustainability is key, says van Dülmen, who also suggests that the failed Based in Berlin might also serve as a “PR campaign” to entice collectors and investors to resurrect a new incarnation of a city art fair in the future. Attracting investment is one of Berlin Art Week’s key aims, in fact. “We’ve invited them. Now we are just hoping they come!” he says of investors.

“Berlin Art Week is a sustainable version of the Based in Berlin campaign,” van Dülmen adds. “It is a good direction and there should and could be more [funding] next year. But if we are to have success with Art Week, all the people involved, from the small project room up to the National Gallery have the same task — to fight for the art.”

As Berlin Art Week kicks off, it seems as though the city’s art scene may have finally found the beginning of a solution to its bureaucratic and structural challenges. “Berlin Art Week resolved to align the different fractions of the art world that seemed incompatible for a long time, and to my surprise managed to keep them on board. That in itself can be considered a success,” Thomas Eller says.

Berlin Art Week runs from Sept. 17-22.

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Saturday, September 21, 2013

BERLIN ART WEEK :: VISUAL DIARY BY KAI TEICHERT

Berlin based artist Kai Teichert, recently shared his visual diary of BERLIN ART WEEK 2013!! As is evident in the photographs, visitors mingled in and out of art venues, spilling into the streets of Berlin. All of the galleries and museums stayed open late and the crisp autumn air allowed those to try out new fall fashion. Thank you to Kai for sharing his weeklong round-up with eyes towards the dove!
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
All photographs Kai Teichert, Berlin Art Week, 2013
Photo-montage by Katy Hamer
All photographs Kai Teichert, Berlin Art Week, 2013
Photo-montage by Katy Hamer

For more of Kai Teichert’s work please visit: http://www.kaiteichert.de
More soon!
xo

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by

September 17, 2013

Our guide to Berlin Art Week

These last few weeks, one could have sworn that the Berlin art world was on holiday. Short of some communication in press departments, you could’ve heard a pin drop. Since last Thursday though, our inboxes have been on fire: Berlin Art Week (Sep 17-22) has begun! So the art department at Exberliner has dutifully taken it upon itself to make sense of the chaos and allow you to enjoy this jam-packed week.

We’re busy taking private behind-the-scenes tours of the major venues and will be out and about, posting live with exclusive interviews and blogs of what’s what in the Berlin art world. Watch this space for all the latest. And join the Exberliner crew on Thursday, September 19 for the Preview opening.


Tuesday, September 17

Art week officially opens Tuesday, with two massive endeavors from the “official” art week organizers.

19:00 The much-anticipated Painting Forever! is a cooperation between Berlinische Galerie, Deutsche Bank KunstHalle, KW Institute for Contemporary Art and Nationalgalerie. It features works in the medium from a full spectrum of art stars. The four different, tandem openings taking place all over the city give visitors the chance to warm up to Art Week and see what the entire city has to offer. Start off early, seeing as much as you can: each space has an interesting offering (although Franz Ackermann at Berlinische Galerie is my personal must-see). If you’re trying to save time, the Kunst Werke opening for Keilrahmen might be your best bet, boasting the most positions of all the participating space and giving a good excuse to already be in Auguststraße for the massive festival they are planning there.

19:00 Auguststraße Festival. This event starts as a small tour of said street, with many of the galleries staying open late. Aside from KW, our absolute must-sees are Egyptian artist Kahled Hafez’s current show Berlin Chromosome at Galerie Naimah Schütter and the opening party for Schöne Grüße Thomas Schütte at ME Collector’s Room.

21:00 There will be an array of musical performances to support the evening, with acts such as Hush Hush, Unmap and DJ Acid Maria.

11:00 DJ Tino Tornado will rock the Spiegelsaal at Clärchens Ballhaus.


Wednesday, September 18

On Wednesday things are moving fast, with an unbelievable amount of openings and events. But tonight, all roads lead to the After Year Zero opening at HKW. Here are some other options…

Worth dropping in… Check out the Painting Forever show BubeDameKönigAss with Martin Eder, Michael Kunze, Anselm Reyle, Thomas Scheibitz at the Neue National Galerie in the late afternoon, Jen Ray’s exhibition at Haus am Lützowplatz (there won’t be special events during art week, but the show itself is an amazing experience) and Liu Ye’s opening at Johnen Galerie (Marienstraße 10).

13-19:00 Homecomings at Horse (Boxhagener Straße 93), featuring a host of cool Icelandic artists such as Ólafur Ólafsson, Hreinn Frydfinnsson, and Elin Hansdottir, among other international artists such as the one-and-only Sophia Pompéry.

14:23:00 The alternative fair B.AGL Art Explosion also opens at Postbahnhof. (Straße der Pariser Kommune 8)

17:00 Yudi Noor and Marissa Favretto at Galerie Christian Ehrentraut (Friedrichstraße 123) The artists’ energy transcends through the work into the space, charging visitors’ psychological battery for the rest of the weekend.

18:00 Ivan Grubanov’s latest exhibition Dead Flags at Loock Galerie (Potsdamer Straße 63)

18:00 Stop by Autocenter for a talk with current exhibition curator Nils Emmerich, checking out their One From One exhibition.

18-23:00 The Berliner Liste opens with opening remarks by the head curator Dr. Peter Funken and Exberliner art editor Fridey Mickel. This year’s Liste serving is better than ever, presenting over 130 different galleries and artists, a curated photography section and much more (stay tuned for our updates).

18:30 Alessio Delfino Rêves / Dreams at Paolo Erbetta Gallery (Potsdamerstr 107)

18:30 Haus der Kulturen der Welt’s After Year Zero exhibition, whose posters have already been seen around town, opens this night, starting with an artist talk that will move into a full-fledged vernissage fete. The story behind the show is the relationship between Africa and Europe since 1945, and sports video work from Egyptian artist Jihan El-Tihari (who filmed Bin Laden at his Sudanese training camp in 1992 for the BBC) and meteorite artist Kader Attia’s re-appropriation of art from the Vatican’s ethnological art collection.

19:00 Move down Unter den Linden to the Schering Stiftung to check out the next opening, Iñigo Manglano – Ovalle Bird in Space at MACH10. We’ll definitely be there too.

19:00 Berlinische Galerie’s Demonstrate! artist talk with renowned curator David Elliot (former director of such museums as the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, The Mori Museum in Tokyo, and the Istanbul Modern), moderated by Berlin’s own Thomas Eller. Stay and check out Franz Ackermann’s contribution to the Painting Forever! project, additionally the opening of Kunst in Berlin 1945 bis heute, a new presentation of the Berlinische Galerie’s collection.

A bit later, Ada Van Hoorebeke’s solo exhibition at the Grimm Museum (Fichtestraße 2) is also not to be missed.

20:00 An interesting project at HAU 2, the finishing exhibition Last Exit to Space initiates an open dialogue about smaller initiatives in regards to the larger Berlin Art Week.


Thursday, September 19

18-22:00 Preview Art Fair opens. The entrance is reduced to €5, and a lot will be happening! Some highlights (to name just a few) are Roey Heifetz at the Israeli Embassy’s fair stand, a rumored pasta performance at Galerie Expo, and Ralf Schmitt’s exhibition through his project Myvisit.to. We’ll be there taking snapshots of people as they come and go, so be sure to come by and say hi.

19:00 We’ll be stopping by to see who of the four nominees will win the coveted Preis der Nationalgalerie für Junge Kunst. Awarded every two years, the prize has foreseen a number of artists who have gone on to be quite big: Christian Jankowski, Olafur Eliasson, Monica Bonvincini, Tacita Dean, Daniel Richter and Cyprian Gilliard, to name a few. This year, the winner, rather a prize of €50,000 and a piece acquisitioned from them, will receive a solo exhibition at the Nationalgalerie with a printed catalog. Our personal forecast is that Mariana Castillo Deball will win, but who knows?

19:00 Equally enticing is the ABC opening (Station Berlin, Luckenwalderstraße 4-6), running at the same time. Thomas Zipp, Julius von Bismark, Tilo Schulz… Hauser + Wirth is presenting this year, as well as galleries from Mexico and even Saudi Arabia.  The crowning achievement of the fair? The enormous endeavor of Timo Klöppel’s “Cubus” for Galerie Kwadrat: c. 300sqm of whited out glass windows, beaming an unearthly light into the space.

19:00 In Marzahn, there’s an opening at Gallery M in connection to the Exotika 2013 project happening throughout the city (in case you haven’t heard, Marzahn is the next big thing for off-spaces in Berlin – there’s word that Tacheles has even found a new home there recently).

19-22:00 The other option would be to go to Kotti to check out the open studios at Künstlerhaus Bethanien (Kohlfurter Straße 41-43), Projektraum Bethanien to see the John Cage show with (a.o.) Matthew Barney and Louise Beourgeois, and the PRAXES Center for Contemporary Art (Alexandrinenstraße 118-121) then to the opening of graffiti art at BC Gallery.

19:30 There’s an artist talk at Haus am Waldsee, if you choose to go west, in support of their current show Entweder / Oder in homage to Søren Kierkegaard. We’re hoping artist Tal R will make an appearance.

On the way back to the city centre, it will be totally worth it to make a stop by Than Hussein Clark’s opening at Galerie Mathew.  Clark’s amazing sunny snapshots will make the detour worth your while.

22:00 Check out Conturbanaries Art Festival at RAW (Revaler Straße 99). It’s the opening party and will be running through to an undetermined hour.


Friday, September 20

Friday is a good day to see (and be seen) at the art fairs…

Worth dropping in… Performance Art master Ulay’s exhibition Ich bin Ich: Ulay on Ulay at Salon Dahlmannwill will be open.

Around Blaine|Southern, the highlights are Uwe Wittwer at Nolan Judin (Potsdamer Straße 83) and a pop up show Suspension at the Alte Sparkasse (Potsdamer Straße 79). Later, checking out Björn Wallbaum’s opening Life on Autofocus, open until midnight at AJLart (Potsdamerstraße 98a).

South Africa Revisited, an exhibition about African comic art opens at Galerie Zwitschermaschine (Potsdamer Straße 161), and really big winds will bellow through Francesco Clemente’s show Tents at Blaine|Southern (Potsdamer Straße 77-87).

September Galerie (Blumenthalstraße 8) has an opening with really great photography, KM Temporärer opens its last show before leaving its space in the Kremmener Straße (8a).

Check out the B-Men playing at the “SEZZESSION” pop up show at SEZ Berlin (Landsberger Allee 77), with works from artists Marc Bijl and Zhivago Duncan. This show is especially cool because you’ll get to experience these popular artists in a more human environment than the blue chip galleries where they usually are shown.

Last but not least, there’s a pop up show in an empty shop in Brunnenstraße (178), across from Weinbergspark with work from the sculptor Christian Henkel, fluorescent, figurative Marie Aly (she’s really hot in Amsterdam right now), and hammer-geil drawings from Patrick Farzar.

14-18:00 Ulrich Wüst Index / Berlin Leporellos exhibition at Collection Regard (Steinstraße 12). It’s a very magical Harry-Potter-esque side street in Mitte that you would never know unless you’re from Berlin. Or read us.

15-21:00 Ari Benjamin Meyers’ performance Serious Immobilities at Esther Shipper (Schöneberger Ufer 65) – read our interview with Meyers here.

17:00 Head to Kleine Humboldt Galerie, for a free tour of this student initiative at the Humboldt Graduate School.

18:00 The opening of the final exhibition of Goldrausch artists called Körnelia at Galerie im Körnerpark (Schierkerstraße 8).

18-21:30 Glasgow Weekend, an open-air exhibition and performance series of Glaswegian art and artists including (among others) Franz Ferdinand and Douglas Gordon in the pavilion of the Volksbühne in cooperation with the just-as-Glaswegian David Dale Gallery.

19-20:30 Galerie Michael Schulze will host a talk with artist duo Römer + Römer, in support of the show they’re running there.

Next door head to Woeske Gallery and Galerie Pop/Off/Art, also hosting events. Expect a strong Moscow flair! Close by is also the opening of Benjamin Rubloff Security at White Square Gallery (Fasanenstraße 58).

19:00 The group show Domestic Space 2 at Zweigstelle (Lehrterstraße 37).

21:30-1:00 Afterparty of the Glasgow weekend.


Saturday, September 21

Worth dropping by… Chert (Skalitzer Straße 68) is showing 3 Pounds of Jelly with Vanessa Safavi, which opened the night before.

Head over to Exile Galerie (Skalitzer Straße 104), to hear Berlin’s living legend Stephan Jung give an artist talk about his amazing paintings (they’re really impossible to photograph).

You might want to travel to exp12 / exposure twelve (Greifswalderstraße 217) for photo exhibition from Isabel Kiesewetter Konversion, taking spontaneous photography of former military places as they turn into facilities for civilian use. The works are very alien, but worth the ride.

14:00 Follow the guided tour through the Collection Artur de Ganay (Köpenicker Straße 10A). The collection includes works from artists like Laurenz Berges, Götz Diergarten, Elger Esser, Candida Höfer, Thomas Ruff, Susanne Schuricht, Sarah Schönfeld, Thomas Struth, and Hiroshi Sugimoto.

16-21:00 Schinkel Pavilion (Oberwallstraße 1) is hosting performances every day for Art Week, but today is our favourite. See Diskursive Konstruktion Kommunikative Destruktion with Karl Holmqvist, Gerwald Rockenschaub, Anna Ly Sing, and Douglas Gordon.

17:00 Plural Project at Atelierhof Kreuzberg (Schleiermacherstraße 31-37) presents a series of film viewings, talks readings and performances. You’ll surely find a lot of interesting things to see at the Atelierhof, as it hosts the studios of many exciting and prominent Berlin artists.

Close by will be a finissage at Neurotitan (Rosenthaler Straße 39) for their group show called My Icon. The space has a slight Gothic flair, and this would be a good chance to run by and get to know it.

20:30 Isa Mortag Freund is performing Fatal Female Fiction at Janine Bean Galerie.

21:00 Don’t miss the official Art Week party at Kreuzberg Pavilion with Salon Hansa’s No More Heroes. It’s the 20-year anniversary of the Salon Hansa project, and sadly the last one, so don’t miss this “siren in the city” on Saturday night with musical performances and Djing from party host Hansa Wisskirchen enhancing the show. It’s an interesting and unusual opportunity to see artists such as Shila Khatami, Alicja Kwade, Torsten Solin and Olaf Hajek showing together.


Sunday, September 22

Worth dropping in… If you need some air, go see Wild New Territories, a traveling exhibition already shown in London and Vancouver, now on view at the Botanical Gardens and Museum. The pop-up exhibition Sezzession at SEZ Berlin will be open, hosting a series of artist talks throughout the day with names like Marc Bijl and Zhivago Duncan.

Sunday flows into a quiet end with a finissage of West Germany’s (Skalitzer Straße 133) political satire exhibition Tötet die ‘Geistig-Politische-Wende’, wo ihr sie trefft! (with Diego Castro, Frederik Foert, Uwe Jonas, etc).

12-13:00 MD72 (a sister project space run by Galerie Neu) will be hosting a book release party of Nick Mauss’s new catalog at Antiquariat Herold (Hagelbergerstraße 15).

16-18:00 Thomas Eller stands in as moderator for a panel discussion about performance art called Threshholds (Where Does Theatre End and Art Begin?), organized by Momentum at CHB (Collegium Hungaricum, Dorotheenstraße 12). The panel consists of Francesca Romana Ciardi, Nezekat Ekici, Jeni Fulton, Mathilde ter Heijne, Shermin Langhoff, Hajnal Németh.

Enjoy the wild ride!

– See more at: http://www.exberliner.com/culture/art/berlin-art-week-2013/page-2.html#sthash.e9fWSwy6.dpuf

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ART SPACE

Art Market

9 Gripping Artworks From the Berlin Art Week Fairs

AZ ongoing until 10.11

ADRIAN GHENIE & NAVID NUUR : On the Road to … Tarascon

The show is a collaboration between gallery artists Romanian painter Adrian Ghenie and the post-conceptual Iranian-born Dutch artist Navid Nuur, (one of which is selling in astronomical amounts, it is your guess who). A perfectly orchestrated show, celebrating (and at the same time I think making just a little bit of fun of) the materiality of color, the rythm of painting and two different artists take on the Batman and Robin theme or the Batman and Bruce Wayne theme. Again, something you have probably not seen before. Whatever you do, do not read the press release it will take the edge out of the whole thing. (D)

Christian Falsnaes – Opening

One thing that I would honestly recommend is this performance video settled in a tiny room between the 3rd and 4th floor at KW.  It’s a performance built on several levels of awkward and funny, made into a music video and displayed with a piece made during the performance. Spoiler alert: the video contains forced dancing, male nudity and ( you guessed it!) Ellen Blumenstein. (A)

KW / ongoing until 10.11

Honorary mentions
David Shringley: Big Shoes @BQ / until 26. Oct
Francesco Clemente: Tents @Blainsouthern / until 06.Nov

These are the Bpigs picks. Did we miss something? Let us know!

– See more at: http://www.bpigs.com/diaries/berlin-art-week-gallery-shows-not-miss#sthash.8mvVZgWc.dpuf

Berlin Art Week reviewed

A performative turn away from a focus on traditional arts.

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Berlin Art Week header

Berlin Art Week is a collaboration between eleven of Berlin’s leading contemporary art institutions, this year running from September 17 to 22. With four of them joining up this year to present painting exhibitions under the Painting Forever! banner some may have felt that the event was skewed towards the more traditional arts. But elsewhere in the program it went the other way. At the art fair, abc – art berlin contemporary, painted canvases were a rare sight, with time-based and site-specific works rising to the fore. Moreover, the addition of ten new institutions to the program, the majority of them project spaces, allowed for a more diverse and experimental program, a noticeable trend being an abundance of performance-based works. With many of the major institutions simply opening their six-month long exhibition projects, performance allowed the art week to be what it purports –a temporary and experience based affair.

abc continues to maintain that it is not strictly an art fair, despite being an event which invites galleries to present artists. Its main point-of-difference lies in its sprawling interior architecture (which dispenses with traditional white booths), and encourages larger installations and site-specific works. This year more than ever, galleries seemed to respond to abc’s more experimental format, exhibiting more ephemeral applications. One such was Laura Lima’s work, presented byBrazil’s A Gentil Carioca) where a hand reached from underneath a white wall, struggling to grasp some keys placed just out of reach. Occasional passers-by kicking the keys closer only to have them thrown-away again, the hand continuing its fruitless search.

Emi Hariyama, Marcus Doering, Lower Order Ethics and Peter Kirn, 'Thresholds' (2013) @ Collegium Hungaricum Berlin.

Emi Hariyama, Marcus Doering, Lower Order Ethics and Peter Kirn, ‘Thresholds’ (2013) @ Collegium Hungaricum Berlin.

Meanwhile, performance was incorporated into the format with independent Parisian art-space Shanaynay curating an area where selected galleries staged two-hour-long exhibitions. While these shows ranged from more literal executions (a woman wielding a bull whip), to behind-the-scenes preparation (walls being painted), the nature of the display and its fixed duration, rendered all of these exhibitions performance. While this idea of a performed exhibition is not a new concept, it was a very fitting one for abc, which is seems to be encouraging and attracting time-based arts and innovative modes of display.

While abc displayed the exhibition-as-performance, Schinkel Pavillon, a space for contemporary sculpture, displayed the studio-as-performance. Over four-days the Viennese relational art group, Gelitin, created sculptures based on their conversations with twelve Berlin-based artists. Each evening the group exhibited a kind of open-studio where they would create the sculptures. Kicking aside some paint-splattered balloons, I entered the space late on a Saturday to see a stage strewn with garbage, half-formed sculptures and random objects. Minimal synth music played while a monotonous voice read from a German text. One artist was making hot chocolate, while another, a manly looking guy wearing plastic boobs, drilled together some broken chairs. A fourth, wearing an apron and a “Josef Boys” t-shirt, attempted to bring some order to the space, picking up rubbish and arranging objects. After Thursday’s performance, BpigsAdela Lovric wrote: “if somebody wanted to make a cliché portrait of Art, it would look pretty much like Schinkel Pavillon yesterday.” But this total cliché also seemed more than a little tongue-in-cheek. Being performed was a kind of ultimate sculptors studio, a hedonistic space allowing maximal experimentation. And with the knowledge that Gelatin were making art-works based on other artists’ ideas, their sculptures seemed more performance and parody than original creation.

Gelatin, 'Stop Anna Ly Sing' (2013), performance view @ Schinkel Pavillon.

Gelatin, ‘Stop Anna Ly Sing’ (2013), performance view @ Schinkel Pavillon.

Worlds away from the tactile messiness at Schinkel, was the slicker and technologically savvy performance curated by MOMENTUM; a platform for time-based art in Berlin. In an interdisciplinary performance at the Collegium Hungaricum Berlin, ballet dancer Emi Hariyama interacted with projected light and digital animation created by Dr. Marcus Doering. In the first and most refined section, a shifting outline of Hariyama was projected onto her body, giving her a flickering neon halo. This trace then proliferated, so that various digital bodies moved in increasing delay from the original figure. As the performer moved through a variety of interactive effects, the performance began to feel like a series of increasingly novel tricks, each based on the premise that the dancer was triggering changes in the digital imagery. So while there were moments of innovation, it also fulfilled every expectation that might arise from the description “multimedia contemporary dance”.

The most pure forms of performance art were at a survey of Turkish artists, presented as part of a longer running project by the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) and TANAS. Held inside the decadent Art Nouveau theatre of HAU 1, performances seemed to address conventions of classical theatre and performance. Ayşe Erkmen’s work ‘7 Times’ (2013), saw a large metal bar, the kind that would usually hold large set backdrops, lowered and raised seven times. The sound of the bar dropping managed to convey the promise of a scene-change without ever delivering one. Annika Kahrs’ work ‘Strings’ (2010), entailed members of a classical string quartet changing places during the performance, forcing each musician to play instruments they had little proficiency in.

Across the different forms of performance art at Berlin Art Week, there seemed to be a preference for cross-disciplinary works. In two instances, performance was treated as a condition that could be applied to something else: abc “performed” exhibitions, Schinkel Pavillon “performed” an artists studio. MOMENTUM presented the most obvious coming-together of different mediums, while pieces for n.b.k and TANAS used contemporary performance to reinterpret more traditional theatrical forms. As performance art becomes increasingly included in the kind of big art events that it used to be largely excluded from, there seems to be a tendency to show it in reference to other art forms. So while this year’s performance inclusions at Berlin Art Week proved interesting, it could also be presented as a stand-alone medium. **

Berlin Art Week runs across venues in Berlin, Germany, annually in September.

Header image: Emi Hariyama, Marcus Doering, Lower Order Ethics and Peter Kirn, ‘Thresholds’ (2013) @ Collegium Hungaricum Berlin. Photo by Jessyca Hutchens.

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REVIEW BERLINER LISTE 2013 DURING BERLIN ART WEEKBerliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

In the former heat and power station, as the 10th Annual Berliner Liste opens for the day, all you hear are the hushed sounds of artists and gallerists organizing their booths. A steady stream of visitors walk in, adding to the soundscape a murmur of people discussing prices, techniques, and ideas.

The dizzying amount of artwork creates a background for communication between all facets of the art world. Managing Director, Jörgen Golz, says ”We want to emphasise the unconventional nature of the Berliner Liste and really show what an exciting stage Berlin offers aspiring artists, free of old-fashioned clichés and cliquey connections”. Peter Funken, this year’s curator, also underlines the importance of open connections: “I see the Berliner Liste as a chance to bring people together: artists, gallery owners, project group leaders, curators, art fanatics and art lovers” In this mecca of young, up-and-coming art it is difficult to not find something or someone you love.

Artconnect Berlin had its own booth featuring four of our talented artists: Matthias Schade, Julia Benz, Jose Romussi and Atladóttir & d’Ors.

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Matthias Schade, a native Berliner, presented six photographs from his Flower Series. He primarily deals with the urban surroundings of Berlin. He believes the hecticness of everyday life often rushes by too fast for many reasons – and beautiful moments along with it. His photographs bring visual place and time to the fore and decelerate our daily lives in subtle ways.

His photographs capture the  flower as a whole, outside of it’s natural context where it might be overlooked. The shadow of the plant reflected on the white background give a sense of depth and movement as the flower is brought towards the viewer, highlighting the beauty in such a simple thing. His work create a moment of serenity within the frenzy of the Berliner Liste.

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See more of Matthias Schade’s work 

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Julia Benz, originally from Wittlich, Germany, believes that “A painting starts with painting itself and not the idea.” Her characters are neither moral nor practical instances imaging carriers of messages, but fun picture ideas. Julia presented five paintings at this year’s exhibition: Gardening Web, Nature One, Nature Two, Summer Knight, and Mushroom

Her paintings are often colorful and loud, as her paintings exemplified at the exhibit. The colors and details interact to create a mesmerizing picture of the fantastical. Benz claims that ” [she] direct[s] the banal big and loud, because it’s wonderful.” Attendees of the Berliner Liste seemed to agree as the paintings frequently caught their attention.

Screen shot 2013-09-22 at 10.18.23 AM

See more of Julia Benz’s work

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

José Romussi is a Chilean artist who works primarily with screenprints and collages made from photographs and embroidery. He is inspired by dancers for their supernatural power, their precision and their elegance. He uses embroidery to underline the dynamic of their frozen movements.

His pieces Art cannot, Flower of life, Ubahn, and Skull juxtapose physical, tangible beauty with a hidden dynamism. On Art cannot the text embroidered over the photo reads “Art cannot be criticized because every mistake is a new creation.” José’s pieces bring a reflexive skepticism to the viewer in one beautiful moment.

Screen shot 2013-09-22 at 10.20.45 AM

Read our interview with José Romussi

See more of José Romussi’s work

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Altadóttir & d’Ors are a Spanish and Icelandic pair who have been collaborating on The First Collection, a multidisciplinary project positioned within the boundaries of art and avantgarde fashion since 2010. The collection reflects the interest of the artists for contemporary sociopolitical dilemmas, the modern versus the primitive, technology and natural forces, and their fascination for unbalanced situations.

At this year’s event, Altadóttir & d’Ors presented a photograph The Traditional Collection / The Independent Republic of Bellona (2010) and three clocks representing the Independent Republic of Bellona. Their pieces are an exercise in a visual dialogue of diversity, change, emancipation and female identity.

Screen shot 2013-09-22 at 10.23.45 AM

See more of Altadóttir & d’Ors’ work at http://thefirstcollection.is   http://galeriejaapsleper.nl   http://vabariigibellona.org

SEE THE FULL LIST OF ARTCONNECT EVENTS HERE!

Berliner Liste 2013 BerlinArt Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

Berliner Liste 2013 Berlin Art Week © Artconnect Berlin

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Top ten artists from Berlin Art Week

Hung & Drawn: Stone circles, secret bars and anarchic antics from Berlin’s art extravaganza

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Berlin Art Week kicked off this recently, with fairs like art berlin contemporary drawing 130 galleries from across the world presenting some 120 projects spanning the entire of Berlin. With Berlin’s ever-present emphasis on new and emerging artists and site-specific work, this week presents an unparalleled opportunity to talent spot upcoming talent. Here are our ten picks of the week.

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Freedman Fitzpatrick at ABC

This young gallery, steered by Alex Freedman and Robbie Fitzpatrick, bring their venture home to Berlin for their first art fair. These stones hum nonchalantly in the ABC old train station courtyard, each composition specific to the space hollowed inside it, resonating with the cavity the artist has carved out.

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Sarah Lucas

Sarah Lucas at CFA

Initially not resembling a Sarah Lucas exhibition at all, minimal concrete and wood furniture designs fill the space, inviting visitors to sit or lean on the furniture. Lucas coffee table books are in place on the artist-made coffee tables, all set against the backdrop of a wall-size image of two brightly vajazzled groins. On closer inspection, more familiar sculptures also sit on the furniture, their tights-bodies slumped against the concrete, drawing a parallel between the dual use of the furniture as plinth, platform or seat.

– Gelatin – Stop – Anna Ly Sing – Stop – Discursive Construction Communicative Destruction at Schinkel Pavillon

The Viennese group bring their anarchic antics to the glass pavilion.  With a collection of what can only be described as “stuff” from their studio, they’re making sculptures throughout several evening events, in which they invite other major artists (including Thomas Zipp and Douglas Gordon) to collaborate. So far we’ve seen balloons, plaster, motorbikes, drums and feedback noise…

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Ilja Karilampi

D at ZweiDrei

Organised by a small group including the Composing Room‘s Ché Zara Blomfield, the exhibition accumulates works by young artists with art hooks in Berlin including Petra Cortright, Harm van den Dorpel, Aude Pariset and Aleksandra Domanovic. It’s worth the journey off the ABC art track for Santiago Taccetti’s optical blocks, luridly sprayed and displayed on a mirror plinth.

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Liquid Autist

Liquid Autist at Kraupta Tuskany – Zeidler

An ambitious curatorial statement conflating the term “liquidity” as applied to economics with a perceived “autistic” tendency in today’s neo-liberal, Silicon Valley-driven society.  The all-male exhibition brings together 11 artists including Simon Denny, Tue Greenfort and Timur Si-Qin to address the “autistic” mind at work within the network.

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Interior shot of St Agnes

Jeppe Hein at St Agnes

Jeppe Hein brings his precise architectural sculpture to the atmospheric chamber of St. Agnes’ church.  The brutalist monument now owned by Berlin gallerist Johann Koenig plays host to solo presentations by major artists, each carefully considered and specific to the environment; worth it for the architecture alone.

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Draft for a particular vision of the future at Babette

Draft for a particular vision of the future – Babette

Elise Lammer and Samuel Leuenburger curate this exhibition in cult Berlin hangout Babette. Built in 1962, this Josef Kaiser-built model of socialist architecture was a part of East Germany’s post WWII reconstruction.  This site-specific insertion into the time and history of the space, presented by artists Claudia Comte, Jerszy Seymour and Philipp Timischl, is punctuated by events – including a party hosted by Autocenter and Shanaynay with Dju Dju B, Ilja Karilampi, DJ Skype and TCF.

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Exterior shot of the BQ gallery

Valise / Glasgow Weekend at BQ

Glasgow hits Berlin for Art Week curated by David Dale Gallery, The Dutchy and Sarah Lowndes. The exhibition speeds across the BQ plaza, incorporating the Volksbühne pavilion, for a weekend of parties, events and performances from artists including Romany Dear, Torsten Lauschmann and Douglas Gordon.

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Outside Shanaynay

Shanaynay at ABC

The Paris-based organisation present Upcoming Exhibitions at ABC, a program introduced by Shanaynay in order to host international artist groups and project spaces. The blank white space in the entrance waits patiently until activated anew every two hours by groups including London-based Auto Italia and Brooklyn-based Cleopatra’s.

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Alistair Frost

Chewday’s at ???

A collaborative installation-slash-bar in Mitte, artists Alistair Frost, Gabriele Beveridge, Florian Auer and friends are announcing the address on the day via email. Keep it secret, keep it safe.

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The Best Of Berlin Art Week

Attending Berlin Art Week for the first time can be like stumbling down a rabbit-hole into a sensory overloaded wonderland. Tweedledee and Tweedledum are the gallery curators, the hookah-smoking caterpillar is the chilled-out Berliner vibe that encompasses you, and the grinning Cheshire cat is your face after a day at the booths.
“Berlin Art Week actually already happens 52 times a year,” said Moritz van Dülmen of Kulturprojekte Berlin, the organization behind the event. Attracting thousands of designers, photographers, illustrators, filmmakers, and musicians annually, Berlin has truly become a year-round muse for the artistically inclined.
With Berlin Art Week the already-electrifying city shifts into overdrive, uniting many of the disparate elements that form Berlin’s art world in an unprecedented, all-embracing approach across the city’s creative spectrum. With 21 venues over six days from Sept 17-22, attendees definitely needed Alice’s “DRINK ME” potion to heighten their senses to conquer the whole soiree.
Below we’ve culled some of our favorite mind-expanding exhibitions from this fantastic labyrinth of a festival:
Suspension by Artistdock
Suspension © Mathias Wasik
Some of the works’ relationships to suspension were literal, like Max Strasser’s paintings of UFOs, Charlotte Perrin’s video Plongeur with a diver frozen in a continuous and abstract loop, or Pablo Mercado’s Tea and Madeleine, Tribute to Marcel Proust, which reconstructed a memory of tea time with a chair, table, and teacups suspended in mid-air, reminiscent of a Matrix fight scene. García Sánchez instead explored “political limbo” with his series of drawings The Fall of Capitalism and Chansook Choi’s The Promised Land presented a place isolated in its own perfection.
Suspension © Mathias Wasik
The Berlin World Improvement Machine by Friedrich von Borries
Berlin World Improvement Machine © Mathias Wasik
What if while Shakespeare was wondering “To be or not to be?” and Newton formulating universal gravitation in the 17th century, innovators in old Berlin were conspiring a top-secret plan to build a machine to better the world?
Spurring a discussion about the role of art and science in relation to the improvement of our present-day world, architect and curator Friedrich von Borries tracked the secret components of this (real) machine and created a curatorial intervention in 16 Berlin museums during Berlin Art Week. Based on research amassed at the Academy of Arts (1696), the Academy of Sciences (1700) and later the Royal Museums of Berlin (from 1830), von Borries created a treasure map marking approximately 70 artworks and artifacts that together unfold to improve the world.
In addition, the Hamburger Bahnhof Museum Für Gegenwart Berlin presented a 15-meter high model of the World Improvement Machine in its inner courtyard.
How Not to be Seen: A F*cking Didactic Educational .MOV File by Hito Steyerl
How Not To Be Seen – Film Still © Hito Steyerl, courtesy of Wilfried Lentz Rotterdam
Thanks to Hito Steyerl’s instructional “How Not to be Seen” video, invisibility cloaks and camouflage gear have been rendered futile. Featured at the Venice Biennale and Berlinerische Galerie during Berlin Art Week, the film informs viewers how to remain invisible in an age of image proliferation. One suggestion is to digitally camouflage oneself (to demonstrate, Steyerl smears green paint on her face and is chroma-keyed into invisibility), while another suggested tactic is to be smaller than the size of a pixel.
Worth Noting:
Preview Berlin Art Fair: As a tribute to 18-year-old Miami street artist Israel Hernández, a.k.a. Reefa, who was tasered to death by a police officer, Gallerist Pablo Gehr of G&G Fine Art constructed an installation of works at Preview Berlin Art Fair, including two works by internationally famed street artist Banksy.
Painting Forever!: Leading Berlin contemporary art institutions Berlinische Galerie, Deutsche Bank KunstHalle and KW Institute for Contemporary Art and Nationalgalerie joined forces to bring painting into focus at the artiest time of the year in Berlin.
Hush Hush: One of the multiple alter-egos of American artist Christopher Kline, Hush Hush describes himself as a ‘self-styled hit-machine’, considering every track a single and defiantly creating pop music which is not, in fact, very popular.
To the West: 13 OSTKREUZ photographers explored the urbanization of Charlottenburg, making a visual inventory through photographs of this urban microcosm that oscillates between clichés and reality, rundown buildings and splendor, commerce and science, decline and new beginnings.
To The West © OSTREUZ
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Art Market

9 Gripping Artworks From the Berlin Art Week Fairs

By Bill Claps

Oct. 2, 2013

9 Gripping Artworks From the Berlin Art Week Fairs

The Art Berlin Contemporary fair

The main venue of the biannual Berlin Art Week was the Art Berlin Contemporary fair, hosting 133 galleries from around the world, the majority from Berlin, as well as galleries from the rest of Germany and 22 other countries. Set in a converted train station and connected warehouse buildings, the fair space was designed as a deconstructivist version of an art fair, with open gallery spaces built out of exposed recycled materials, creating a feeling that the fair was one large installation. Each gallery presented the work of a single artist, many of whom produced works specifically for the space. Some took advantage of the fair’s internal structure to incorporate elements of their work, others created time-based works that transformed over the course of the fair. We picked out a few highlights from the main fair, as well as its satellite, Preview Berlin.

Luca Trevisani, Galerie Mehdi Chouakri, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Trevisani’s time-based installation at the fair consisted of elegant mobiles and sculptural forms that incorporate flowers, ice, and resin. Over the course of the event, the installation decayed and transformed, providing a meditation on impermanence and the transitory nature of living things.

Paula Doepfner, I Need a Little Sugar, Galerie Tanja Wagner, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Another time-based installation that made use of ice, as well as glass and compressed plants, Doepfner created an environment that evoked the tension between the ephemeral and the permanent. The installation deals with the amygdala, the part of the brain that is essential for the evaluation of experiences and the perception of emotion. At the center of the installation was an ice block hanging from the ceiling and enclosing within it a piece of paper with handwritten scientific notes about the amygdala. The block melts over time, distorting and abstracting the text. At the periphery were sculptures composed of glass plates containing moss and plant blossoms, evoking veins and brain mass, and providing a counterpoint to the disintegrating ice sculpture at the center.

Anahita Razmi, A Tale of Tehrangeles, Carbon 12, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Razmi’s installation took the beginning of the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities as the basis for a visual collage of Tehran and Los Angeles, where 750,000 Iranian immigrants and descendants live. The installation combines a two-screen city collage with a single-screen commentary monitor set up as a green-screen studio, with the artist as “anchorwoman,” reading random passages from the beginning of the novel. Striking connections and similarities between the two locales are evoked, with the effect being the creation of an intermediate space or city.

Brigitte Waldach, Brain Box, Galleri Bo Bjerggaard, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Waldach’s Brain Box graphically constructed the process that traces the mental path of an idea into an ideology. By stringing together a web of rubber bands and cords, she traces the links between external phenomena that inspire thought and action and the internal processes that transform those thoughts into an idea and, eventually, a system of belief. The installation is a matrix that invites the viewer to enter the space and contemplate their positioning in relation to society and history.

Julia Aranda, The Knot is Not (The Rope), OMR, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Aranda presented an array of banal sculptural objects, all executed in white. The installation—in effect a collection of useless things—speaks to the energy that material objects still maintain after they have exhausted their usefulness and perhaps even overstayed their welcome, like this vanishing rope, frayed to its breaking point.

Elizabeth Neel, The Skin of a Dolphin is like that of an Eggplant, Pilar Corrias, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Neel’s boldly composed works were among the few examples of expressive painting at the fair. Interspersed with monochromatic sculptures, the works reference animal bones and organic shapes, interposed with geometric markings.

Hahan, Trinity, ARNDT, Art Berlin Contemporary

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Uji Handoko Eko Saputro, a.k.a. Hahan, is an Indonesian artist that derives his imagery from cartoons, anime, and pop culture. His series of cartoon-like sculptures comment on the commodification of the art market and the exploitation and loss of identity that artists experienced during the Indonesian art boom between 2007 to 2009. The sculptures represent the trinity of the curator, artist, and collector.

Preview Berlin Art Fair

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Berlin Art Week’s largest satellite fair was Preview, hosting 77 galleries, most of which are based in Berlin. The fair was located in a building housing the former painters’ halls of the opera workshop in Zinnowitzer Strasse, where, until recently, sets for the major stages of Berlin were created.

Sebastian Schrader, Maerzgalerie, Preview Berlin Art Fair

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Schrader’s highly skilled and finely detailed paintings, rendered in an Old Masters style, present a mix of art-historical and contemporary subjects in often humorous scenarios. The works show a curiosity about the themes of ego, libido, globalization, and power.

Alexander Habisreutinger, Galerie Gerkin, Preview Berlin Art Fair

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Habisreutinger’s intricate drawings, geometrical wood sculptures, and three-dimensional mixed-media paintings represent an eclectic output that references organic structures, rock formations, and architecture.

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Programminformation / Program information

Auswahl an Veranstaltungen in Berliner Projekträume und -initiativen während der Berlin Art Week im Zeitraum 17. – 22. September 2013
Selection of events of Berlin Independent Project Spaces and Initiatives during
the Berlin Art Week in the period from September 17th – 21st 2013

UNWETTER
“Discursive Picnic_lustige Grube”
Sept. 15th, 2 pm
Leipziger Str. 41, 10117 Berlin
URL: www.un-wetter.net– 2 days before Berlin Art Week –
after the butcher
“Das neue Fleisch” – Exhibition of the Melton Prior Instituts für Reportagezeichnung und Druckkultur / Düsseldorf. Mit: Monika Baer, Michael Dougan, Felix Reidenbach, Alexander Roob, Dierk Schmidt, Zhou Xiaopeng u.a.
Sept. 19th – 21st, Tue-Sat, 1-7 pm
Spittastr. 25, 10317 Berlin
URL: www.after-the-butcher.de
Altes Finanzamt
Sept. 17th, 9 pm: Performance: The Live Machine. Slides, Texts, Voices, Sounds by Filament Stanza | Sept. 19th, 8:45 pm: Performance: Philosophical Football by Phifa (Philosophical Football Association) |
Sept. 21th, 9 pm: Concert: Time Lapse. Live Electronic Music.
Schönstedtstr. 7 / EG, 12043 Berlin
URL: altesfinanzamt.blogspot.de
Artitude e.V./SRS Berlin
“Utopia”, group show presented by Galerie Utopia Berlin/Athens
“In-situ”, Site-specific works by Santiago Sierra, Nasan Tur and others
Sept. 19th – 21st, 12-2 pm
Opening: Sept. 18th, 7-12 pm + party
Cuvrystr. 3-4, 10997 Berlin
URL: www.artitu.de
arttransponder
“WE ARE WORKING…”
Open Office & Project Archive, Sept. 17th and 19th, 12-5 pm and by appointment
Soldiner Str. 92, 13359 Berlin
URL: www.arttransponder.net
ausland / projekt archiv e.V.
“AmSTARt”, Sven Kacirek live,
Sept. 19th, 8-12 pm
“sav”, Mija Milovic / Lars Bech Pilgaard,
Sept. 20th, 8.30-12 pm
“biegungen im ausland”, 2 group shows
Sept. 21th, 8.30-12 pm, Sept. 22nd, 8-12 pm
Lychener Str. 60, 10437 Berlin
URL: www.ausland-berlin.de
AUTOCENTER Space for Contemporary Art
Maik Schierloh + Joep van Liefland
“One from None”,
Wed-Sun 4-7pm (during the Art Week)
lecture and tour with the curator Nils Emmerichs: Sept. 18th, 6pm
Leipziger Str. 56, 10117 Berlin
URL: www.autocenterart.de
Axel Obiger
“vocabulary”, Harriet Groß und Beate Terfloth
Sept. 19th – 21st, 2-7 pm
“Juliane Zelwies · No more words, no other thoughts. About the rituals of speaking. Part 1: Richard and Felix, Berlin/London 2012, 20 min, HD”, Sept. 20th, 7:30 pm
Brunnenstraße 29, 10119 Berlin
URL: www.axelobiger.com
BEL ETAGE
“Slug Bait”, Installation can be seen
at daylight and by appointment,
Sept. 19th – 22nd, Vernissage: Sept. 18th, 6pm
corner Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz / Linienstr. 16, 10178 Berlin
URL: bel-etage-projects.de
berlinerpool
“artists’ archive”, Sept. 17th – 22nd, 2-6 pm
“SLOW portfolio viewing”, Sept. 21th, 3-5 pm
Maybachufer 16, 12047 Berlin
berlinerpool at Berliner Liste
Sept. 19th – 21st, 1-9 pm / 22nd, 1-7 pm
Opening: 18th, 6 pm + party (Tresor Club)
Made in America [Explicit], Linda Weiss / Asuman Kirlangic, Sept. 20th, 5 pm
Bundesallee 88, 12161 Berlin
URL: www.berlinerpool.de
URL: www.facebook.com/events/1411646589061711
BERLIN WEEKLY
“Traces”, Installation can be seen
from sunrise to 1 am
Linienstr. 160, 10115 Berlin
URL: berlin-weekly.com
Büro komPleX
“Finanz(ierung)system Kunsthandeln”
Anteilnehmer/innentreffen / share taker meeting 2013
Sept. 21st, 4-10 pm
Alte Jakobstraße 12, 10969 Berlin
URL: www.buerokomPleX.net
Collection Regard
“INDEX / Berlin Leporellos”, Ulrich Wüst
Sept. 20th, Fri 2-6 pm
Steinstr. 12, 10019 Berlin
URL: www.collectionregard.com
Dada Post
“Photo Op: The Ubiquity of Photography”
Sept. 14th to Oct. 6th, Tue-Sun, 1-6 pm
Nordbahnstr. 10, 13409 Berlin
URL: www.dadapost.com
die raum
“Ludwig Leo – Ausschnitt”
Sept. 17th – 21st, 10-6 pm
Oderberger Str. 56, 10437 Berlin
URL: www.dieraum.net
d i n g u m
“Off Menu”, Tom Humphreys
Event on Sept. 17th (see webiste),
URL: www.dingum.de
Galerie Kurt im Hirsch
Inszenierte Träume II/II, Matvey Slavin and Nana Bastrup
Sept. 20th – 22nd, Fri-Sun, 2-5 pm
Kastanienallee 12, 2. HH, 10435 Berlin
URL: www.kurt-im-hirsch.de
Galerie R31
“Black Beans/ Liquid Gold”
Sept. 17th – 21st, 3-7 pm and by appointment
Reuterstr. 31, 12047 Berlin
URL: www.R31.suchtkunst.de
Galerie SU DE COUCOU
“LIKE HER II” – 14 artists, nine pioneering female figures from Lille, Breslau and Brno
Sept. 19th – 21st, Thu 2-12 pm, Fri-Sat 2-7 pm
Kuratorenjubiläum: 25 years Lena Braun opening with book release party EDITION FortyFour,
Thu, Sept. 19th, 7 pm
Weserstraße 202, 12047 Berlin
URL: www.sudecoucou.net
General Public
“Komplexraum #7”, Antonia Low und Astrid Nippoldt
Sept. 21st – 22nd, Sat-Sun, 3-7 pm
Schoenhauser Allee 167c, 10435 Berlin
URL: www.generalpublic.de
Gitte Bohr – Club für Kunst und politisches Denken
“Tötet die ‘Geistig-Politische-Wende’, wo ihr sie trefft!”
Opening Sept. 18th, 7 pm;
Sept. 19th – 21st, 5-8 pm
“Außerparlamentarischer <post>demokratischer Wahlabend”, Sept. 22nd, 6 pm
Skalitzer Str. 133, 2. OG, 10999 Berlin
URL: www.gittebohr.de
GlogauAIR
“Showcase Project”
Sept. 19th – 22nd, Tue-Sun 0-12 am (24 hours/day)
Glogauer Str. 16, 10999 Berlin
URL: www.glogauair.net
GRIMMUSEUM
“The Shop Floor”, Ada Van Hoorebeke
(with a soundtrack by Hanah Giese, Eva Van Deuren & Wietske Van Gils)
Sept. 18th – 22th, 2-6pm
Opening: Sept. 18th, 7-11pm
Fichtestr. 2, 10967 Berlin
URL: www.grimmuseum.com
Group Global 3000
“Müll und Recycling. Superhelden”
Sept. 17th – 22nd, 5 – 8 pm
Artisttalk: A. Goloborodko: Architektur aus Müll, Sept. 20th, 7 pm
Leuschnerdamm 19, 10999 Berlin
URL: www.groupglobal3000.de
Grüntaler9 – a space towards the performative
“Painting Now!”
Sept. 17th – 22nd, 12-5 pm and by appointment; Opening (in presence of the artists): Sept. 17th, 5 pm
Grüntaler Str. 9, 13357 Berlin
URL: www.gruentaler9.com
“Hip Hop Stützpunkt” mit From Here To Fame und Common Ground Gallery
Werkschau 2007-2013
12-6 pm
Marienburger Str. 16A -Gewerbehof, 10405 Berlin
URL: www.fromheretofame.com/khaled_said.html
Import Projects
Jennifer in Paradise -Constant Dullaart-
Sept. 17th – 21st, 12-6 pm
Event: Windows of the World, Shenzhen by Constant Dullaart & The World by Jia Zhangke, film screening – date: tbc
Keithstraße 10, 10787 Berlin
URL: import-projects.org
Infernoesque
„Artists in Residence 2013“
Laura Aldridge & Joe Scotland, U.K.
Opening: Sept. 20th, 6-10 pm
Sept. 21st, 1-7 pm
URL: www.infernoesque.de
Institut für Alles Mögliche
“GASTSPIELE [ 8 ] – OQBO”
Sept. 20th – 22nd, tba – see website
Opening: September 20th, 7 pm
Ackerstr. 18, 10115 Berlin
URL: www.i-a-m.tk
KINDERHOOK & CARACAS
“early works”, Mirak Jamal
Sept. 20th – 21st, Fri-Sat 2-6 pm
Opening: September 13th, 6-9 pm
Kreuzbergstr. 42e, 10965 Berlin
URL: www.kinderhook-caracas.com
KinderKunstWerkstatt von KoduKu e.V.
Regular courses and workshops
Open Studio: Sept. 22nd, 3 pm
Fichtestr. 28, 10967 Berlin
URL: www.kinderkunstwerkstatt-berlin.de
KREUZBERG PAVILLON
Sat, Sept. 21st, 8 pm-1 am
“NO MORE HEROES ANYMORE”
group show, cur. by Hansa Wißkirchen
Olivia Berckemeyer Armin Boehm, Sascha Boldt, Saskia Buwert, Björn Dahlem, Pia Dehne, Björn Dressler, Agathe Fleury, Tine Furler, Nico Glaenzel, Marc Gröszer, Markus Günther, Uwe Henneken, Gregor Hildebrandt u.a.
Naunynstr. 53, Gartenstudio Berlin,
10999 Berlin
URL: www.kreuzbergpavillon.de
Kunsthalle am Hamburger Platz
VERLIEBTE KÜNSTLER (& Lachende Dritte …)
Sept. 19th – 22nd, Tue-Sun, 2-7 pm
Hamburger Platz, Gustav Adolf Str. 140,
13086 Berlin
URL: www.kunsthalle.kh-berlin.de
Kunstraum Tapir/ Takt Artist Residency Berlin
“Real it up!”, Takt Summer Residency show curatet by Nina Thorwart
Opening: Sept. 20th, 7-10 pm
Sept. 21st – 22nd, 4-7 pm
Weserstr. 11, 10247 Berlin
URL: taktberlin.org
Kurt-Kurt
Kunst und Kontext im Stadtlabor Moabit
Katharina Grosse “mein schreibtisch, das schneefeld”
Sept. 19th – 21st, Tue-Sat, 4-7 pm
Finissage: Sept. 19th, 4-7 pm
Lübecker Straße 13, 10559 Berlin
URL: www.kurt-kurt.de
Liebig12
“PROUD FLESH” by JENNY GRÄF SHEPPARD & CHIARA GIOVANDO – Video installation
Sept. 19th – 22nd, Tue-Sun, 3-6 pm
Liebigstr. 12, 10247 Berlin
URL: www.liebig12.wordpress.com
LoBe / London Berlin
“Nika Radić & Annie Davey”
by appointment info@lo-be.net
Schererstr. 7, 13347 Berlin
URL: www.lo-be.net
Loge
“Unsere Ferien am Lago Maggiore 1964”
Sept. 17th-22nd, 10-7pm
Friedrichstrasse 210, 10969 Berlin
URL: www.loge-berlin.com
MEINBLAU Projektraum
“Denn alles was den Gesetzen des Verstandes und der Vernunft widerstreitet, ist freilich unmöglich”
Opening: Fri, Sept. 20th, 6 pm
Sept. 21st – 22nd, 2-7 pm
Christinenstr. 18/19, 10119 Berlin
URL: www.meinblau.de
Monika Pfau / Temporary Showroom
“addicted to question”, Louisa Clement
& Anna Vogel
Sept. 17th – 21st, 12-6 pm and by appointment
Große Hamburger Str. 36, 10115 Berlin
URL: www.monikapfau.de
MyVisit.to
MyVisit.to featuring Kunstverein Familie Montez – Frankfurt
Opening: Thursday, September 19th, 6 pm
“WURZELN WEIT MEHR AUFMERKSAMKEIT WIDMEN” (5)
Friday, Sept. 20th – 21st, daily 1–8 pm
PREVIEW BERLIN ART FAIR, booth no. 14 + 23, Opernwerkstätten Berlin, Zinnowitzer Str. 9, 10115 Berlin
URL: www.MyVisit.to
OZEAN
“WONDERHUT”
daily 12-8 pm
Schleiermacherstr. 31, 10961 Berlin
URL: www.ozean-berlin.com
Panke e.V.
Panke Week programme,
Sept. 18th – 22nd, 12-5am
“What is … “; “UKIYO-E PANKE CINEMA”
Sept. 18th and 19th, from 8 pm
Gerichtstr. 23, Hof 5., 13347 Berlin
URL: www.pankeculture.com
Pavillon am Milchhof
“Triptychon”, Atelierhaus Mengerzeile zu Gast
Sept. 17th – 22nd, 0-12 am (24 hours/day)
Schwedter Str. 232, 10435 Berlin
URL: www.milchhofpavillon.de
rosalux
“FACEANDBOOKME / BEYONCÉ 4,95”
Kerstin Weichsel,
Sept. 19th – 21st, 3-6pm
Wriezener Str. 12, 13559 Berlin
URL: www.rosalux.com
Sameheads
Sept. 17th: We are not Gemüsed – Comedy Open Mic Night; Sept. 18th: Sameheads Cinema – Rare gems; Sept. 19th: “Q&A” Neukölln’s finest trivia night; Sept. 20th: Independent fashion showcase at Sameheads; Sept. 21st: Dance party at Sameheads
Richardstr. 10, 12043 Berlin
URL: www.sameheads.com
Schillerpalais e.V. Kunst und Aktionsraum
Debbie Davies und Rudolph Rechenmacher
Sept. 17th – 20th, 10-6 pm
Schillerpromenade 4, 12049 Berlin
URL: www.schillerpalais.de
Scotty Enterprises
“MOBILE MASSES OF MUSCULAR TISSUE COVERED WITH MUCOUS MEMBRANE LOCATED IN THE ORAL CAVITIES. FROM SÃO PAULO WITH LOVE, TITI + SISI”, Elke Auer and Esther Straganz/curated by Annette Sonnewend
Sept. 20th – Oct. 10th
Wed.-Fri. 3-7 pm, Sat.: 12-4 pm
Opening: Sept. 20th, 7pm
Oranienstr. 46, 10969 Berlin
URL: www.scotty-enterprises.de
Scriptings
at: MISS READ: The Berlin Art Book Fair
Sept. 19th. – 22nd, 12-7 pm
Luckenwalder Strasse 4-6, 10963 Berlin
URL: www.scriptings.net
Spor Klübü
“REMIX” – 10 years in the mix, group show with 100 artists
open by appointment tel. 0179-8593744
Event: Finissage and artsit talk with Richard Schütz, Sept. 22nd, 3pm
Freienwalder Str. 31, 13359 Berlin
URL: www.koloniewedding.de/sporkluebue
Staatsgalerie Prenzlauer Berg
“Negative Space” (Photographie), Joe Dilworth
Sept. 19th – 22nd, Thu-Sat 1-9 pm, Sun 1-7 pm
Opening: September 12th, 7-10pm
Event: Welteis – eine wahre Geschichte,
reading by Christina Wessely
Wed, Sept. 18th, 9 pm
Greifswalder Straße 218‎, 10405 Berlin
URL www.staatsgalerie-prenzlauerberg.de
super bien!
gewächshaus für zeitgenössische kunst
“loating landscape”, installation by Anne Katrin Stork, foto and sculpture
the installation can be seen from the outside all day and night
Schwedter Str. 232‎, 10435 Berlin
URL www.superbien.de
SUPERMARKT
Event: “Ikono”, Panel.
Sept. 17th, 10 am – 6 pm
Brunnenstr. 64, 13355 Berlin
URL: www.supermarkt-berlin.de
uqbar
“Aykan Sagoglu – Off-White Tulips”
Sept. 19th – 22nd, Thue – Sun, 2 – 7 pm
Schwedenstr. 16, 13357 Berlin
URL: projectspace.uqbar-ev.de
Walden Kunstausstellungen
“Kunst und Banausen”
Sept. 17th – 22nd, 3 – 7 pm
Opening: Georg Polke
Sept. 22nd, 3 pm
Hufelandstr. 35, 10407 Berlin
URL: www.galerie-walden.de
WerkStadt
Kulturverein Berlin e.V.
“Brendan Jamison: Teufelsberg Spy Station”
Sept. 17th – 21st, from 7 pm and by appointment
Emser Str. 124, 12051 Berlin
URL: www.werkstadt-berlin.com
WestGermany – Büro für postpostmoderne Kommunikation
Gitte Bohr – Club für Kunst und politisches Denken: “Tötet die ‘Geistig-Politische-Wende’, wo ihr sie trefft!”
Opening Sept. 18th, 7 pm;
Sept. 19th – 21st, 5-8 pm
“Außerparlamentarischer <post>demokratischer Wahlabend”, Sept. 22nd, 6 pm
Skalitzer Str. 133, 2. OG, 10999 Berlin
URL: www.westgermany.eu . www.gittebohr.de
wordwedding
“Meister der Fremde = Meister der Heimat”
Sept. 21st – 22nd, Sat-Sun 2-6 pm
Prinzenallee 59‎, 13187 Berlin
URL www.wortwedding.blogspot.com
ZK/U – Zentrum für Kunst und Urbanistik
“Speisekino Moabit #20 – Innercity Peripheries”
Sept. 20th, 8 pm
“ZK/U im Kooperation mit 14km – the shortest distance between North Africa and Europe e.V.: Arab film screening series – Screening #3/ Documentary and Discussion”
Sept. 18th, 7:30 pm
Siemensstr. 27, 10551 Berlin
URL www.zku-berlin.org

© Das Urheberrecht für die Fotos liegt bei den jeweiligen Veranstaltern.
© copyrights for the images are held by the respective organiser.

Screen shot 2013-09-22 at 10.20.45 AM

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