Reviews of Now Dig This! exhibition at LA Hammer Museum and MoMA PS1 – Part of Pacific Standard Time

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W magazine

David Hammons’s America the Beautiful, 1968

Can You Dig It?

In the Sixties and Seventies, a vibrant community of African-American artists and collectors thrived in Los Angeles, right under the establishment’s nose. Kevin West surveys “Now Dig This!”—a new exhibition that aims to give them their due.

IN 1963 JOHN OUTTERBRIDGE LEFT CHICAGO for a new life in sunny Los Angeles. Born in North Carolina and an alumnus of Chicago’s American Academy of Art, Outterbridge, then 30, was making art but supporting himself with a day job as a city bus driver. L.A. beckoned as the kind of place where Outterbridge might be able to work full-time as an artist—something that was just then becoming imaginable for an African-American. “People were really coming to this area for change—to be artists,” says art historian Kellie Jones. “Outterbridge was doing well in Chicago, but he was driving a bus. He heard that L.A. was ‘cool’—and that it was warm—and the idea was to be able to work in the arts.”

Today Los Angeles is a global capital of contemporary art, and artists working here—including such stars as Mark Bradford and Edgar Arceneaux—can earn their place on the international art scene without regard to skin color. But that was hardly the case when Outterbridge hit town almost 50 years ago. At that time, the city’s large cultural institutions and influential private galleries were essentially “segregated,” says Jones, or at least strikingly inattentive to African-Americans. She points out that when painter ­David Hammons—who later crossed over to achieve mainstream success as a conceptual and performance artist in New York in the Nineties—arrived in Los Angeles from Springfield, Illinois, in 1963, his reaction to the nascent black art scene was utter surprise. “He said, ‘I didn’t even know that there were African-American artists, just like there were black cowboys,’” Jones ­recounts as she sits in the café at UCLA’s Hammer Museum to discuss the exhibition she has curated, “Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980.” “All of the artists in the show were born in a segregated country.” Opening on October 2, “Dig” is the Hammer’s contribution to “Pacific Standard Time,” a sprawling look at postwar Los Angeles organized by the Getty and involving some 70 collaborating institutions.

According to Jones, although the establishment largely ignored African-American art throughout the Sixties, the first generation of black artists in L.A. “willed” their community into existence by organizing exhibitions in homes, community centers, black-owned businesses and churches. After the 1965 Watts Riots, a new creative neighborhood took root in the Leimert Park area around Crenshaw Boulevard and Vernon Avenue—the first black-owned commercial galleries opened there, followed by African-American art writers, critics, and a black collector class composed mostly of doctors and attorneys. It was L.A.’s African-American SoHo.

“What was happening here in the Sixties and Seventies was really a cultural renaissance,” says attorney Stan Sanders, 69, who began collecting art in 1970 and was close to a number of artists in the Hammer show. “Guys were welding [sculpture] in their backyards. Outterbridge was collecting the detritus of Los Angeles and creating something beautiful.”

Even today, the legacy of the city’s black arts community will likely surprise many visitors to “Dig.” L.A.’s art history has typically been examined through the work and careers of such white artists as Ed Ruscha, John Baldessari, and Bruce Nauman, as well as through accounts of mainstream galleries like Ferus and the short-lived Huysman Gallery. The parallel story of L.A.’s black scene has only begun to be documented, and many of the movement’s seminal names—artists and collectors alike—will be unfamiliar even to knowledgeable art enthusiasts.

“Dig” includes some 140 works by 35 artists, most of whom have rarely been displayed in museums. Among them is Betye Saar, who was born in Los Angeles in 1926 and worked as a jewelry designer before creating the prints for which she became known. But numerous other “Dig” artists came to L.A. as part of the Great Migration—the African-American diaspora out of the South, often by way of Chicago, Detroit, and other northern cities. One of the earliest was William Pajaud, who came from New Orleans via Chicago in the Forties and later painted scenes from black history at a time when African-American studies had not yet emerged as its own field. Pajaud also became an important steward of L.A.’s black arts legacy when, from 1957 until 1987, he curated the Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company’s 200-piece corporate collection, which was perhaps the single most important trove of black art from Los Angeles until it was broken up and sold in 2007. Another key early figure was painter and muralist Charles White, who came in 1956 from Chicago, had a solo show at the University of Southern California two years later, and went on to teach at Otis College of Art and Design, where Hammons was among his students.

“You have one or two artists who went and made it in New York, like Hammons or Mel Edwards,” says Leon Banks, a doctor and the patrician godfather of the black arts scene, and a lender to the Hammer show. “People don’t think of them as being L.A. artists, but they are.” Now 86, Banks was raised in Washington, D.C., where he had his first taste of art at the city’s public museums and later caught the collecting bug while serving as an Air Force captain in England. He moved to Los Angeles in the early Fifties; once his medical practice gained traction, he began buying abstract art by Mark Rothko, Sam Francis, and Robert Rauschenberg—as well as “Dig” artists, including painter and mixed-media artist Daniel LaRue Johnson and his Hispanic wife, painter Virginia Jaramillo.

In stark contrast to the vast wealth of the most prominent white collectors in L.A. over the past half-century—the Norton Simons and Eli Broads—Banks was typical of the middle-class black professionals who collected, joined museum boards, and helped found the California African American Museum (CAAM) in the late Seventies and build its permanent home in downtown’s Exposition Park in 1984. “It didn’t take a whole lot of money,” says Banks, who is still making the gallery rounds and attended a recent Kehinde Wiley opening at the Roberts & Tilton gallery in Culver City. “Most of my things came from the artists. It was a meeting of the minds.”

This also explains why, despite Banks’s affinity for abstract art, one of the artists who is represented the most in his collection is David Hockney. The two first met around 1960, at the home of collector Beatrice Gersh, when Banks stepped outside to tend to a nosebleed from a recent sinus operation and met the young British artist, who had gone out to smoke. The two quickly struck up a friendship. “His studio was about 10 blocks from my ­office,” Banks says. “Sometimes at lunchtime I’d go and we’d play chess.” Hockney has since painted Banks twice, once in 1980 and again in 2000. The portraits—as well as numerous other Hockney works—hang in Banks’s low-slung, taupe-colored midcentury home in upscale View Park.

IN THE YEARS AFTER THE WATTS RIOTS, protests calling attention to the contributions of black artists forced public institutions—funded, of course, by taxpayer dollars—to take notice. In 1970 a group of workers from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, seeking legal counsel for a manifestation against what they saw as a failure by the museum to engage its black constituency, walked across Wilshire Boulevard into Stan Sanders’s law office. It became his unexpected entrée into a new art-world vortex.

“At that time, LACMA had no African-Americans on its board of directors and no African-­Americans among its docents,” Sanders explains. “The highest-ranking African-Americans in the whole firmament of employees and volunteers at LACMA were the preparators—the guys who actually handled the art.” Sanders signed on to a group that became the Black Arts Council—which advised the museum—along with Banks, advocate Samella Lewis, and Aurelia Brooks, CAAM’s first executive director.

Sanders admits that he didn’t know much about collecting contemporary art at the time, but learned by going on regular gallery and studio visits with Cecil Fergerson, a preparator he met through his involvement with the Black Arts Council. He was drawn into the dynamic and intellectually compelling milieu. The Brockman Gallery, run by Dale and Alonzo Davis, was “a gathering place,” recalls Sanders. Named after their grandmother, it was the city’s first black-owned commercial gallery and existed for 30 years. (By comparison, Ferus was open for nine.) Equally important to the scene was Lewis, who came to Los Angeles in 1964 to study Chinese and tirelessly championed L.A.’s black artists. Lewis opened a series of galleries that culminated with the Museum of African American Art and somehow found the time to run the Black Art Quarterly and publish the two-volume Black Artists on Art, which surveyed the work of nearly 150 contemporary artists—all while teaching full-time at Scripps College in Claremont.

“There was ferment,” Sanders says. “There was this cross-­fertilization ­between young professionals and artists. We were mostly just hanging out together, but even if what we did was roll a joint and talk all night, we mixed the politics with the art.”

Of course, in a national cultural landscape fueled by protests, crackdowns, and counterreactions on the fronts of civil rights and Black Power—all set amidst the pop-culture stardom of Aretha Franklin, Curtis Mayfield, and Muhammad Ali—artists of all stripes were highly engaged politically. That was especially true of African-American artists, who quickly set about digging into pointed questions about black history and identity. Sanders recalls the artists he knew making art about “their own rage, to a very large extent, but also about the ordinary lives of ordinary people.”

“Dig” curator Jones says that for some black artists who wanted to participate in the era’s profound change without necessarily making overtly propagandistic works, the tension between politics and personal expression was “a conundrum.” Outterbridge, John Riddle, Johnson, Saar, and sculptor Noah Purifoy worked in assemblage, a style strongly associated with white artists in Southern California in the late Fifties and Sixties. But in the hands of African-American artists it took on a distinctive cultural and political resonance. Riddle was inspired by his experience of sifting through the postrebellion rubble in Watts, while Senga Nengudi and Maren Hassinger made ephemeral but deeply personal assemblage with scraps of pantyhose and wire, among other materials. Hammons worked with human hair collected from African-American barbershops.

The question of audience was another major concern. On the one hand, as Jones explains, black artists wanted their work to be “legible” to inexperienced viewers—demonstrators, picketers, and other young political activists—yet they also aspired to contend with their own more informed understanding of art history. “They were cognizant of not making art for a mainstream, wealthy, white collector population,” she says, “but they still wanted to be a part of the history of art.” By 1976, LACMA responded to the efforts of the Black Arts Council with the exhibition “Two Centuries of Black American Art: 1750–1950”—one of the first museum shows of its kind and also the last major L.A. exhibition dedicated exclusively to African-­American art until “Dig.”

Among those who saw the exhibition was UCLA medical student Joy Simmons, now a 58-year-old radiologist with a wide-ranging collection of contemporary African-­American art. Simmons grew up in Los Angeles (her high school art teacher was Brockman Gallery cofounder Alonzo Davis), attended Stanford, and had entrée into the New York black art community through an aunt on the board at the Studio Museum in Harlem. She began collecting as a medical student—through Brockman, of course. “When I bought my first piece, it was only $50,” she recalls, sitting in her Baldwin Hills home among a collection that now includes work by contemporary artists Kara Walker, Mark Bradford, and Kehinde Wiley. “Then, every time I could scrape something together, I’d buy art.”

Other medical students she knew were doing the same. Simmons recalls Banks and older physicians as important role models, including cardiothoracic surgeon George Jackson, who commissioned painter Suzanne Jackson to cover one exterior wall of his private practice with a mural. One small detail of the LACMA show, however, helped clarify Simmons’s sense of mission as a collector: She couldn’t help but notice that most lenders of the show’s historical material had Jewish surnames.

“It was really eye-opening for me,” she recalls. “The major pieces of our work were not owned by us. That’s a reason I’ve tried to assemble a collection that is museum-worthy.” With the exception of Hammons, few of the artists in the “Dig” show have been widely pursued by contemporary white collectors or large public institutions, although Banks, Lewis, and others have steered select pieces into the permanent collections at the Oakland Museum, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington, D.C., the Whitney in New York, and LACMA. That attitude is quickly changing, however, with a growing awareness of the historical importance—not to mention the rising market value—of black L.A. artists.

Recognition on the scale of the “Dig” show would have seemed unthinkable when Outterbridge was scraping by as a bus driver in Chicago. Equally unimaginable at that time was the establishment’s embrace of an African-American artist such as Walker, who has had solo exhibitions all over the world, including a midcareer survey at the Walker Art Center. Contemporary star Mark Bradford even eschews labels of race, such as “African-American artist”—which shows just how much has happened since Stan Sanders was arguing politics and art with Hammons, Outterbridge, and other members of the “Dig” crowd back in the Seventies.

“People would wrestle with that,” Sanders explains, “like, What is a ­Negro? We didn’t quite know what a Negro was. We had arguments all night long about whether the word should be capitalized.” He recalls with a chuckle that the birth certificate of a former law partner, who was born in Los Angeles in 1940, categorized his race as “Abyssinian.” Sanders’s wife, Debbie, shakes her head at what now seems a historical absurdity—one which only underscores how fluid yet intractable the issue of race continues to be in America.

“My parents were ‘colored,’ ” she says. “I was a ‘Negro.’ My daughters were ‘black.’ And now my granddaughter is ‘African-American.’ Go figure.”

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http://hyperallergic.com/59017/now-dig-this-moma-ps1/

Museums

The Fantastic and Revelatory Story of Art and Black LA

The introduction to "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980"

The introduction to “Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980″ (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic)

On first glance, some may wonder why MoMA PS1, a New York contemporary art museum, has just opened a historical exhibition of art from Los Angeles. But as MoMA PS1 curator Peter Eleey explained at the press preview last week, the show in question, Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980, actually has a connection to the New York institution: many of the artists in the exhibition eventually migrated from LA to New York, and some of the art on view was actually shown there in the 1980s. “It’s nice to be able to show historical work here, to be able to choose things that reflect the founding period” of the museum, Eleey said.

Kellie Jones speaking at the press preview

All of that is well and good, and convincing, too, but in the end it hardly matters at all. Once you step inside the exhibition, you realize that Now Dig This! is so good — so well-curated, so full of fantastic art, so revelatory — that it was worth bringing to New York no matter what. I suspect that even for those MoMA and MoMA PS1 staffers who worked to get it here, the power of the exhibition came first, the connection to PS1 second.

Now Dig This! was originally organized by art historian and Columbia University professor Kellie Jones for the Getty Foundation’s LA art blowout Pacific Standard Time, which involved more 60 cultural institutions from Southern California mounting more than 60 shows about art made in and around LA between 1945 and 1980. It was originally shown at the Hammer Museum and only closed on January 8, meaning the MoMA and PS1 curators managed to bring it here in less than a year. It’s also one of the only shows (at least so far) to travel.

It’s not hard to see why. Amid the grand narrative of postwar LA art painted by Pacific Standard Time, Jones has zoomed in on one specific subset: the black artistic communities (and she takes this to mean the communities as a whole, including participants and friends of other cultural groups) in the city during a two-decade period. But once you get inside the smaller piece she’s broken off, you realize that she’s actually widened the art-historical narrative. She’s blown shit wide open.

Dan Concholar, "Suitcase"

Dan Concholar, “Suitcase” (1980)

The art on view here — 140 works by 33 artists — is sophisticated, playful, thoughtful, political, and beautiful. It’s minimalist and Pop, abstract and figurative, made of found materials and welded steel. It may sound naive or even condescending to marvel at the diversity of it, but it’s the volume and diversity that, when combined with the high quality of the art as well as the little attention it’s received, make the show so profound. In one of the galleries, there is a suitcase spread open on a white platform, its archival contents — magazines, slides, envelopes, artwork — splayed out in and around it. The suitcase, the wall text tells us, is an installation by Dan Concholar but actually belonged to Charles White, one of artists in the “Front Runners” section of the exhibition. It was discovered not too long ago in the archives of Just Above Midtown gallery with unseen artwork by George Clack and Ruth G. Waddy inside it. That suitcase is a microcosm of the entire show.

The exhibition is organized in five sections — “Front Runners,” “Assembling,” “Artists/Gallerists,” “Postminimal Art and Performance,” and “Los Angeles Snapshot/Friends.” As some of those titles suggest, the real underlying subject here, and the reason why the show hangs together so well, is that this is as much a historical exhibition about communities as it is a display of individual art objects.

Charles White, "Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)"

Charles White, “Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)” (detail) (1873)

A sculpture by Melvin Edwards

The show opens with a gallery of work by some of the precedent setters, among them social realist drawings by figurehead Charles White and deeply evocative steel sculptures by Melvin Edwards, the pair of which immediately demonstrates the different ways that art can be political. From there, a stunning room full of assemblages by Betye Saar and John Outterbridge mixes motifs, mediums, and high and low art, the artists drawing on voodoo, traditional African patterns, junk art, Rauschenberg’s confines, and much more. The pieces seem to be carrying on a charged conversation of their own — one that bleeds over into the next room, where more assemblages by Dale Brockman Davis and Noah Purifoy pick up on Saar’s and Outterbridge’s visual themes and inspirations. The gritty but often colorful aesthetic of those works resonates with John T. Riddle’s biting (in subject matter) yet playful (in appearance) metal sculptures, also on view in that gallery.

Work by John Outterbridge (foreground) and Noah Purifoy (background)

John T. Riddle, "Gradual Troop Withdrawal"

John T. Riddle, “Gradual Troop Withdrawal” (1970)

Another two rooms down the line, you’re reminded of the political and social roots of much of this work — although you might just call those roots “life” — when you watch footage from the 1972 Watts Summer Festival and meet African-American kids from the neighborhood who turned their energy and frustration into artwork. This was something that the bonafide artists in Now Dig This! did, too, as Jones explained at the press preview: Purifoy was the first director of the Watts Towers Art Center, and he organized a show after the Watts Rebellion of artists making work from the rubble.

Marie Johnson Calloway, "School Crossing Guard"

Marie Johnson Calloway, “School Crossing Guard” (1970s)

The next room picks up on this idea of local spaces and community, focusing on artists who opened up their own spaces and used the galleries as meeting places. “When people don’t show your work, you show it on your own,” Jones had said. Not only that, but you write your own history, which is what people like Samella Lewis and Ruth Waddy did. Lewis is an artist (a few strong lithographs on view in the first gallery) and art historian who founded the quarterly Black Art in 1976 and published, with Waddy, also an artist, the two-volume Black Artists on Art in 1969 and 1971.

A wall of work by Elizabeth Leigh-Taylor, Samella Lewis, William Pajaud, Ruth Waddy, and Tyrus Wong

Suzanne Jackson, "Apparitional Visitations"

Suzanne Jackson, “Apparitional Visitations” (1973)

The last two rooms of the show focus on postminimal art and performance, moving into more well-known territory with a selection of work by David Hammons alongside a handful others. But Hammons’s art looks different here — it has gained a broader and stronger context and seems to emerge organically from what’s come before. At the press preview Jones told an anecdote about Hammons: at one point he apparently said that he hadn’t known any African-American artists before he met Charles White. Today, Jones pointed out, young African-American artists don’t have the same problem; they know their history. And fortunately for them, but more importantly all of us, we now know even more of it.

David Hammons, "Bag Lady in Flight"

David Hammons, “Bag Lady in Flight” (1970s, reconstructed 1990s)

Foreground: Maren Hassinger, “Place for Nature” (2011); background: Senga Nengudi, “Only Love Saves the Day” (2011)

Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980 is on view at MoMA PS1 (22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens) through March 11, 2013.

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LATimes

Art review: ‘Now Dig This!’ at the UCLA Hammer Museum

October 10, 2011 |  3:15 pm

Dig this Edwards and White 2
At the UCLA Hammer Museum, “Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980” tells an important story that is not so much unknown as underknown.

Many of the individual artists — Melvin Edwards, John Outterbridge, Noah Purifoy, Betye Saar, Charles White and others — are certainly familiar, while David Hammons ranks among the most important American artists of the last 30 years. What hasn’t been the focus before now is the context within which their work developed. “Now Dig This!” lays it out with clarity and compelling insight.

That means, of course, that the exhibition is not simply a compendium of great art. Quality is mixed. Even Hammons is represented mostly by precocious student work (he moved to New York in 1974), interesting primarily for seeing where his subsequent work came from. One of his most potent pieces is a bristling wall assemblage composed from shards of broken records, hair and plaster — contemporary materials combined to evoke an ancestral African “power shield” — but it dates from 1983.

The show, part of the region-wide Pacific Standard Time series, opens with a quiet wallop. The Hammer’s small entry room juxtaposes just two works — Edwards’ 1965 welded steel sculpture “The Lifted X,” all muscular strength laid low by battered industrial forms and grimly suspended hooks, and White’s monumental 1964 ink and charcoal drawing “Birmingham Totem,” its crystalline mound of splintered wood surmounted by the shrouded figure of a crouching youth.

Edwards spent his formative artistic decade in L.A., moving west after high school in Houston and leaving California for New York in 1966. Initially a painter, he began to weld compact wall-reliefs from salvaged metal objects — chains, tools, bolts, gears, padlocks, scissors, etc. — composing intense abstractions that nonetheless recall African masks, Cubist heads and the industrial-strength syntax of Abstract Expressionist sculptor David Smith.

“The Lifted X” ruminates on Malcolm X, the civil rights activist who was murdered as Edwards was at work on a then-unattributed sculpture. Frontal and more than 5 feet tall, almost like a figure on a pedestal, its robust but broken forms seem forever poised between being upraised and hammered down.

White, self-tutored as a kid finding a haven in the galleries of the Art Institute of Chicago and then professionally trained, was widely traveled. By the time he moved to L.A. at 38 his social realist style, influenced by time spent living in Mexico with muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros, was in full flower. His drawing, nearly 6 feet tall, ponders one of the most horrific and galvanizing moments in modern civil rights history — the 1963 Ku Klux Klan bombing of a black church in America’s most virulently segregated city, which left 22 people severely wounded and four children dead.Dig this David20Hammons_AMERICA20THE20BEAUTIFUL_1968 2 The drawing’s mound of architectural splinters is laboriously built up from thin traceries of black ink and firm, rectilinear swipes of charcoal. The overall shape forms a kind of cloaked torso, its head composed from the crouching figure. Nearly hidden, a plumb bob is suspended on a string from the nude youth’s index finger. White’s sober drawing is an almost shamanistic vision of mystical restoration: The plumb bob, an ancient building tool used to determine accurate verticals, also deftly marks the Birmingham crime as a powerful center of gravity in American social history.Hammer guest curator Kellie Jones, an art historian at Columbia University, divides the rest of the show into a loose chronology of four themes. The framework is an effective way to orchestrate about 130 paintings, drawings, sculptures and videos by 33 diverse artists.There are “front-runners,” such as Edwards and White, who influenced younger generations in L.A.’s emergent art scene (compare, for example, White’s drawing to a self-portrait shrouded in an American flag by Hammons, who was White’s student); a large number of assemblage artists, including Outterbridge, Purifoy and Saar, who cobbled together collages and sculptures from discarded and reclaimed objects; artists perhaps better known for the galleries they operated to create exhibition opportunities in a limited art scene; and finally, Post-Minimal and performance artists of the eclectic 1970s.

Los Angeles, as the 1965 Watts rebellion attests, was no safe haven for African Americans. However, the city’s burgeoning growth, coupled with the absence of a strong institutional art-fabric, appears to have offered an open-ended sense of artistic possibility for all these painters, sculptors and performance artists.

The show’s four groups are not exclusive. Edwards was as much an assemblage artist as Outterbridge, whose rag-man aesthetic is more ephemeral than sculptures of welded steel. The shamanistic undercurrent in White’s drawing comes to the surface in Saar’s collages, made from windows whose panes offer glimpses into mystical worlds. Alonzo Davis, who started the Brockman Gallery with his brother, Dale, is represented by a large and arresting collage of torn scraps of silvery painted cardboard, which forms an exalted African map within a Marcus Garvey-style environment of red, green and black

Dig this Noah%20Purifoy_UNTITLED%20%28Assemblage%29_1967 The assemblage room is the show’s core, providing one-third of the works and echoing forward and backward through time. Purifoy is the standout. Great assemblage is often an alchemical transformation of harsh mortality into noble endurance, and a sensational secular altarpiece by Purifoy suggests a legacy-shrine to a passing Jim Crow era. Stuffed to overflowing with castoff tools, its abundance of old shoes and worn brushes evokes the shoeshine stand, a dignified image of labor at once restricted yet resolute.

Suzanne Jackson, familiar for having run Gallery 32, is also a gifted painter. Liquid acrylic washes — among the show’s few paintings — merge figures with landscapes in dreamlike spaces, all poised to slip away like desert mirages. Daniel LaRue Johnson merged painting with assemblage, affixing fragments of a broken doll, a hacksaw, a mousetrap and rubber hose onto a large, black field of viscous, tar-like pitch. Made in the aftermath of Bull Connor’s notorious Birmingham assault on peaceful civil rights marchers, Johnson injected a jolt of black social consciousness into the exalted status abstract artists then afforded to all-black paintings.

Provocative questions also arise. In 1967, Robert Rauschenberg created a sensation: He produced a monumental print called “Booster” at Gemini GEL, said to be the largest lithograph ever made, which  centered around a life-size, medical X-ray self-portrait that removed from art any romantic notion of representing the artist’s inner life. Was Hammons aware of Rauschenberg’s celebrated project? As a nearby student at Otis, he began his pivotal body prints in1968, made by pressing his oiled flesh onto paper and sprinkling pigment over the surface. Their ghostly specters of absent figures fuse the surfaces of art and skin.

“Now Dig This!” is a story of artistic integration — not assimilation, by any stretch of the imagination, but integration broadly understood as the analysis and display of human identity to reach a point of harmony within a larger American environment. The point is cleverly italicized by including modest examples from significant artists who are not African American — Mark di Suvero, Ron Miyashiro, Gordon Wagner, Sheila Levrant de Bretteville and 11 more — but who are identified as contemporaneous colleagues of black artists in the show. It makes for an absorbing narrative.Dig this Suzanne20Jackson_APPARITIONAL20VISITATIONS_1973 2

“Now Dig This! Art in Black Los Angeles 1960-1980,” UCLA Hammer Museum, (310) 443-7000, through Jan. 8. Closed Mondays. www.hammer.ucla.edu

– See more at: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/culturemonster/2011/10/art-review-now-dig-this-hammer-museum.html#sthash.CLNAnfzB.dpuf

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NYTimes

Art Review

Forged From the Fires of the 1960s

‘Now Dig This! Art & Black Los Angeles,’ at MoMA PS1

Collection Eileen Harris Norton, Santa Monica, California

David Hammons’s “Bag Lady in Flight,” first made in the 1970s and reconstructed in 1990. More Photos »

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There is a paradox at the heart of “Now Dig This! Art & Black Los Angeles 1960-1980,” an exhibition at MoMA PS1 about black artists who lived and worked in Los Angeles during a time of revolutionary changes in art and society. It is not specifically addressed by the exhibition, which was organized by Kellie Jones, a Columbia University art historian, and had its debut at the Hammer Museum last year as part of the Californian extravaganza “Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980.” But I think it goes some way toward explaining why so few black artists have been embraced by the predominantly white high-end art world. It has to do with the relationship of black artists to Modernist tradition and the differences between the lives of blacks and whites in this country.

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Foreground, Maren Hassinger’s “Place for Nature” (2011); in the corner, Senga Nengudi’s “Only Love Saves the Day” (2011); and on the wall, David Hammons’s body print, “The Wine Leading the Wine,” around 1969, on display at MoMA PS1 in Queens. More Photos »

Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

“Untitled” (Assemblage), from 1967, by Noah Purifoy, who made sculptures using rubble from the Watts riots. More Photos »

The first piece you encounter on entering the exhibition, a welded-steel construction by Melvin Edwards called “August the Squared Fire” (1965), is emblematic. It consists of an upright rectangular framework within which a concatenation of twisted, bent, boxy forms is held, as if frozen in the moment of tumbling through a door or window. Formally, you have a dialogue between stasis and dynamism, and psychologically, between reason and feeling.

Such dualities would be enough on which to base judgment and interpretation were this a piece by, say, the white junk sculptor Richard Stankiewicz. But it makes a difference to know that Mr. Edwards is African-American and has for decades been producing small, wall-mounted assemblages of industrial steel parts called “The Lynch Fragments,” a few of which are in the show.

There is the allusive title “August the Squared Fire” to consider too. The most violent episode of civil unrest in the city’s history up to that time happened in the predominantly poor and black neighborhood of Watts in August 1965. So Mr. Edwards’s sculpture can be read as a metaphor for the struggle of black people to break through barriers that have kept them down in America.

The Watts uprising was galvanizing for other artists in the exhibition, among them Noah Purifoy, whose densely compacted assemblages of found materials are like the children of a Dadaist and an unhinged folk artist. According to Ms. Jones’s catalog essay, Mr. Purifoy has said that the Watts calamity made him an artist. He and the fellow assemblagists John T. Riddle Jr. and John Outterbridge began to make sculptures using rubble and detritus left in the aftermath of the riots.

Ms. Jones writes, “Purifoy, John Riddle and John Outterbridge reinterpreted Watts as a discursive force, emblematic of both uncompromising energy and willful re-creation, using the artistic currency of assemblage.”

Herein lies the paradox. Black artists did not invent assemblage. In its modern form it was developed by white artists like Picasso, Kurt Schwitters, Marcel Duchamp, David Smith and Robert Rauschenberg. For these artists assemblage was an expression of freedom from conservative aesthetics and parochial social mores. It did not come out of anything like the centuries-long black American experience of being viewed and treated as essentially inferior to white people. It was the art of people who already were about as free as anyone could be.

Thanks to white artists like George Herms, Bruce Conner and Ed Kienholz, assemblage was popular on the West Coast in the 1960s. Appropriated by the artists in “Now Dig This!,” however, it took on a different complexion. It became less a playful messing with habitual ways of thinking, à la Dada and Surrealism, and more an expression of social solidarity.

Mr. Riddle’s “Untitled (Fist)” (1965), for example, is in the form of an old shovel standing on its handle, its business end cut and bent into the form of a clenched hand. This is a far cry from Duchamp’s snow shovel titled “In Advance of the Broken Arm.” Duchamp’s work is a piece of deracinated, intellectual mischief-making designed to question relations between language and reality. Mr. Riddle’s is about a particular population of people digging itself out of a real-world debacle.

If I am right that most of the work in “Now Dig This!” promotes solidarity, then this poses a problem for its audience. It divides viewers between those who, because of their life experiences, will identify with the struggle for black empowerment, and others for whom the black experience remains more a matter of conjecture. Those who identify may tend to respond favorably to what those viewing from a more distanced perspective may regard as social realist clichés, like the defiant fist.

There are some black artists who finesse the difference, David Hammons being a brilliant example and, tellingly, the only artist in this show to be lionized by the mainstream art establishment. He is a Duchampian trickster who toys in surprising ways with signifiers of black culture, poetically unsettling entrenched representations of blackness on both sides of the racial divide.

For me, the exhibition’s most beautiful work is “Bag Lady in Flight,” which Mr. Hammons first made in the 1970s and recreated in 1990. It consists of grease-stained brown shopping bags cut and folded into pleats fanning up and down like wings, the whole extending horizontally almost 10 feet. Pleats along the lower right edge bear triangles of nappy hair, forming a pattern like that of a bird’s wing. It is an ancient notion that angels might reside in the most degraded of human forms, one that Mr. Hammons here updates to inspiring effect. You don’t have to be black to feel that.

Black artists who have gained recognition in the high-end art world have operated in the Hammonsian mode. Robert Colescott, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Adrian Piper, Fred Wilson, Glenn Ligon, Kara Walker and Jayson Musson, a k a Hennessey Youngman, are some who complicate how we think about prejudice and stereotyping. The art of black solidarity gets less traction because the postmodern art world is, at least ostensibly, allergic to overt assertions of any kind of solidarity. Covert solidarity of liberal white folks? That is another story.

“Now Dig This! Art & Black Los Angeles 1960-1980” runs through March 11 at MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, at 46th Avenue, Long Island City, Queens; (718) 784-2084, momaps1.org.

Reviews of the Pacific Standard Times exhibitions in Los Angeles

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http://www.bluecanvas.com/magazine/articles/the-ghost-in-the-pacific-time-machine-chouinard-art-institute-and-the-history-of-art-in-los-angeles

The Ghost in the Pacific Time Machine: Chouinard Art Institute and the History of Art in Los Angeles

Published in Issue 11 by Peter Frank

With a veritable archipelago of exhibitions, well over 60-strong, strung throughout the Southland, the Getty-driven Pacific Standard Time initiative seems to document the postwar Los Angeles art scene with remarkable thoroughness. The extent of the documentation, and the initiative itself, are indeed unprecedented; but in fact, the vastness of the project only serves to highlight its gaps. The Getty itself does not pretend to have organized an exhaustive history of southern California art 1945-1980, but only to have set the compilation of that history in motion (or at least to have kicked it into third gear). With any luck, Pacific Standard Time’s organizers aver, the project itself, scheduled to run through next April, is just the beginning of an ongoing reclamation of southern California’s recent art history.

Perhaps Pacific Standard Time shouldn’t whimper out in 2012, but become some sort of annual (okay, bi-annual) event, during which month or two several institutions, large or small, public or commercial, mount exhibitions devoted specifically to southern California (okay, anywhere California) art before 1980 (indeed, well before 1980 – like 1930, or 1880). Each time around a different focus can be posited: one year can stress, say, women artists; another, oh, abstract painting; still another, how about patrons of the modern.

But if any through-theme demands closer inspection – especially for getting so little this time around – it is the role of art education in the emergence of the southern California art scene. One could argue that our art world is as large and dynamic – and, as we’re learning, durable and already somewhat venerable – as it is because so many artists emerge here and choose to remain. And one can argue further that this plethora of artistic talent has been created not principally by the lure Los Angeles and environs exercise on immigrant artists, but by the region’s ability to create artists – that is, to educate them and initiate them, ultimately, into an overarching community. Counting dedicated art schools and university and college art departments, there are more places to receive an education in visual art, fine and applied, in southern California than in any other comparable region in America.

This, some insist, is a mixed blessing at best. But, then, any similar social condition – the relatively small (if growing) commerce in art, or the influence of Hollywood, or the flexible but rapidly changing real estate available to artists, or the climate – is a mixed blessing. And as far as the pre-1980 L.A. art scene goes, it’s a fact, a done deal, history. Whether driven by local industries’ need for designers, local schools’ need for GI-bill students (after both World Wars), or local boosters’ need for some culture to crow about, southern California schools have been cranking out artists at a steady pace for a good century, at least. And, it would seem, this critical mass has led to a distinctive and dynamic discourse.

The offerings of Pacific Standard Time make this little apparent. The only investigation of a school’s impact undertaken by an institution is “Best Kept Secret,” the Laguna Art Museum’s look at the early years of the University of California Irvine art department. (Full disclosure: I wrote the show’s catalogue essay and consulted a bit on its curation.) More surprisingly, no institution of higher learning has chosen to examine its own art history, at least with anything more than a glancing nod to faculty and alumni. Nearly all such institutions in these parts can lay claim to some significant figure and/or event and/or pedagogic innovation; none, however, has chosen to do so. That would make for a good PST theme…

When that theme happens, in particular, I hope someone mounts an exhibition looking at the Chouinard Art Institute, a great school that can no longer present its own history. Of the several local art schools to have flourished and then disappeared, Chouinard is certainly the most heralded and most fondly remembered – and the most important. Its name keeps coming up as the place that issued degrees, undergraduate and graduate, to some of PST’s “biggest” names – and, not incidentally, that employed many other of those well-known figures. An exhibition surveying the school’s half-century existence was mounted a decade ago – in three institutions in northern San Diego, at a goodly remove from Chouinard’s home base near downtown LA. It is high time for another, (literally) closer look.

That exhibit, “Chouinard: A Living Legacy,” was organized and sponsored by the Chouinard Foundation, then (as now) dedicated to the preservation of the school’s legacy. And it is a more distinctive legacy than most of us realize. We know Chouinard as the art school that became the California Institute for the Arts. That process of “becoming” was not a simple metamorphosis from easel-oriented caterpillar to multi-media butterfly. Economics and politics came to bear, much as they did when, say, the Newport Harbor Art Museum sought to absorb the Laguna Art Museum and become the Orange County Museum of Art (which kinda happened and kinda didn’t), or Norton Simon bought the Pasadena Art Museum and hid it under his own collection (from whence it has been slowly and steadily emerging). Like the Pasadena Museum, Chouinard bowed out with great dignity, a bit less grace, and not at all quietly. And old-timers remember the school as fondly as they do the museum (both of which vanished in the early 1970s).

Chouinard grew out of its principal rival, the Otis Art Institute, but was nearly as old. Founded as World War I wound down, Otis could not grow its physical plant quickly enough to keep up with its burgeoning enrollment. A student revolt prompted Otis’ first teacher of art history, Nelbert Chouinard, to found an additional school literally around the corner – with the blessing of Otis’ own founding administration. The school opened its doors in 1921.

Ms. Chouinard’s directorial approach was somewhat less top-down than was Otis’; while intimately involved in the running of the school’s physical and financial matters – and famously present on campus as a kind of “watchful eye” – she trusted more or less entirely in her teachers to determine their own pedagogies. From the start, artists of different stylistic and ideological persuasions as well as mediumistic skills comprised the faculty, providing students broad exposure to the scope of artistic discourse and allowing each to gravitate to an appropriate mentor. By all accounts, there was a consensus that all instruction was based in drawing, especially but not exclusively drawing from observation. But every instructor interpreted this fundament differently, adapting it to his or her own pedagogical style. This pertained no less to design, illustration, and other applied-arts curricula than it did to the fine arts, resulting in a strong crossover pattern. The list of teachers associated with Chouinard is matched only by the roster of its students – many of whom returned to teach. Early on the school became the redoubt for the southern California “watercolor school,” boasting the likes of Millard Sheets, Rex Brandt, Phil Dike, Phil Paradise, and Emil Kosa. But the local avant garde also thrived at the school, as the recorded presence of Stanton MacDonald-Wright, Lorser Feitelson, Fred Hammersley, William Brice, and Rico Lebrun attests. Visiting scholars, including international figures such as Alexander Archipenko and Hans Hofmann, further enlivened Chouinard’s first decades, and after World War II the school became a veritable crossroads for the national as well as local art scene, hosting increasingly adventurous lectures and events right up to its closing in 1972.

The postwar years were in fact Chouinard’s glory days, when the school was a hotbed of abstract expressionist practice with Hans Burkhardt, Emerson Woelffer, John Altoon, Richards[STET.] Ruben, Matsumi Kanemitsu, Ynez Johnston, Connor Everts and Robert Irwin on hand. Both student and teacher at Chouinard, Irwin became the go-to guy in the late 1950s for a group of disaffected advertising design majors who switched over to fine art – a group including Ron Miyashiro, Joe Goode, and Larry Bell and Ed Ruscha. For his infamous “War Babies” show at the pioneering Huysmans Gallery, Henry Hopkins put Bell, Goode, and Miyashiro together with fellow Chouinard grad Ed Bereal; Ruscha’s career also launched right out of school, at the nearby Ferus Gallery. Yet other artists associated with Chouinard in its final years include – hold on to your hat – Terry Allen, Chuck Arnoldi, Ralph Bacerra, Mary Corse, both Guy and Laddie John Dill, Sam Erenberg, Llyn Foulkes, Raul Guerrero, Gary Lang, Margaret Neilsen, Elsa Rady, Allen Ruppersberg, Peter Shire, Elena Siff, Matthew Thomas, Doug Wheeler, and Tom Wudl.

This list, of course, only scratches the surface of Chouinard. The “Living Legacy” show brought together dozens of artists, some notable enough for their reputations, but more notable for their achievement, an achievement perhaps overshadowed by their classmates and colleagues but testifying to the organizing principle of Pacific Standard Time, that Los Angeles was a cauldron of artistic accomplishment and experiment long before it was recognized as such. Indeed, the Chouinard legacy demonstrates that that cauldron began brewing well before even PST’s chronological reach. Nelbert Chouinard was an enlightened and dedicated administrator, and had a hands-on involvement with her school for most of its existence. She was less gifted with money, more generous and trusting than judicious (allowing, for instance, accountants to embezzle the school’s funds at least twice), and the school spent much of its existence in financial peril. During the Depression and War years in particular, when Chouinard had to compete with Otis and its newer neighbor Art Center College for a shrunken enrollment, it teetered on the edge of collapse.

Walt Disney, who sent many of his animators to Chouinard for training and re-training, was an early and frequent angel; but after his death in 1966 (and Chouinard’s own three years later), his Imagineers re-imagined the school into something else. As the list of artists above indicates, the school was no stranger to “post-studio” art, and had begun as early as 1960 to expand its conception of artistic practice under the guidance of art-school professionals Mitch Wilder and Gerald Nordland. But the absorption of Chouinard into a pan-artistic Institute of the Arts hadn’t been in the cards until the Disney people decided to play their hand.

With its emphasis on drawing and intensive studio practice, Chouinard was a hotbed of stylistic revolution and academic improvisation, yet not of practical innovation the way Cal Arts was, and remains. One might deduce that, as its rival art schools themselves evolved, Chouinard lost its edge in the competition to be edgy; but accounts indicate that it was a lively, even unpredictable place to study and to teach right up to its final commencement forty years ago. It might also be determined that only in the wake of Chouinard’s demise did Otis and Art Center (not to mention the neo-traditional Laguna College of Art and Design) undergo their own radical transformations.

In this respect, especially, the Chouinard Art Institute is the spectre that haunts the Los Angeles art world. It is a friendly ghost, but a restless one, and, as the PST exhibitions evince, it gets around.

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LA magazine

September 2011 Issue

The Insider’s Guide to Art in Los Angeles

Pacific Standard Time, a massive Getty-organized expo this fall, includes more than 50 cultural institutions and confirms what Angelenos have known for years: Their city is a creative powerhouse to rival New York.

David Hockney, A Bigger Splash, 1967.

You might be forgiven for thinking that the American art scene begins and ends in New York City. But Los Angeles is where Chris Burden reinvented performance art by having a friend shoot him in the arm. It’s where Edward Kienholz birthed assemblage sculpture, John Baldessari helped forge Conceptualism, Judy Chicago gave creative voice to feminism, and Charles and Ray Eames laid the groundwork for today’s design industry. Ed Ruscha and David Hockney made Southern California imagery key to the language of Pop Art, and although New Yorkers might not want to hear it, L.A. was the first place Andy Warhol exhibited his famous soup cans.

While the quality of the work coming out of the Southland lately—Ryan Trecartin’s caffeinated videos, Shepard Fairey’s ubiquitous graphics—is impossible to deny, “there’s still this idea that before the 1980s there was no art scene in Los Angeles,” says Andrew Perchuk, the deputy director of the Getty Research Institute. He’s spearheading Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980, which traces the formation and influence of L.A.’s postwar art scene. When it opens next month—at the Getty and more than 50 other SoCal centers—it will be the city’s biggest art extravaganza to date.

Perchuk hopes Pacific Standard Time will direct new attention to L.A. as a global art mecca. “People don’t think about getting on a plane and going to see art here like they do with New York or London or Paris,” he says. But there are plenty of reasons they should: New York gallerist Jeffrey Deitch arrived last year to revitalize the Museum of Contemporary Art, while philanthropist Eli Broad is bankrolling a new campus by Renzo Piano for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and a building downtown by Diller Scofidio + Renfro for his own contemporary collection. Downtown is the official arts district, thanks to the studios in former toy factories and cold-storage warehouses, but farther west in tiny Culver City, dozens of galleries have opened in the past decade.

Today’s work reflects the same spirit of collaboration and rejection of convention evident in Pacific Standard Time—a result of the city’s dispersed geography and lack of traditional arts infrastructure. Gallery shows are rarely the goal; rather, L.A. is sprinkled with pop-ups, roaming truck exhibitions, and raucous live performances. “I’m not trying to frame it into a kind of regionalism,” says Edgar Arceneaux, a native Angeleno working on a “social sculpture” near the Watts Towers. “But the artists here seem to have a particular kind of gumption for doing it themselves.”

• • •

THE FIVE MUST SEE-SHOWS

Don’t miss these exhibitions at this fall’s Pacific Standard Time art extravaganza

“State of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970”
The rise of California Conceptualism, featuring artists ranging from Chris Burden to William Wegman.
Orange County Museum of Art, opens October 9

Eames storage unit, 1951-52, Charles and Ray Eames

“California Design, 1930-1965: Living in a Modern Way”
A history of the “California look” in interior design, from the Eameses’ iconic loungers to architectural pottery.
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, opens October 1

Diamond Column, 1978, DeWain Valentine

“Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface”
Installations by artists like James Turrell and Bruce Nauman that explore perception and the body’s relationship to the external world.
Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, opens September 25

“Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960-1980”
Explores the city’s often-overlooked African-American artists and their role in the civil-rights and Black Power movements.
Hammer Museum, opens October 2

Instant Mural, 1974, Asco

“Asco: Elite of The Obscure, A Retrospective, 1972-1987”
A survey of the collective that famously tagged LACMA’s exterior to protest the absence of Latino artists inside.
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, opens September 4

Continued (page 2 of 2)

• • •

THE L.A. ART SCENE THROUGH THE YEARS

Pacific Standard Time curator Andrew Perchuk shares 10 of the city’s watershed creative moments.

1921
Walter and Louise Arensberg move their collection of Dada and Surrealism to Hollywood, subsequently schooling a generation of local artists and curators in modern art.

1945
Editor John Entenza founds the Case Study House program, recruiting architects like the Eameses, Richard Neutra, and Pierre Koenig to design visionary modern homes.

Black Girl’s Window, 1969, Betye Saar1954
The Watts Towers are completed, establishing Southern California as a hub for assemblage art; noteworthy practitioners over the ensuing decades will include Edward Kienholz, Bruce Conner, Wallace Berman, and Betye Saar.

1962
Los Angeles’ Ferus Gallery is the first to give Andy Warhol—who will later say, “The further west we drove, the more Pop everything looked”—a venue to exhibit his iconic Campbell’s soup cans.

1970
John Baldessari founds the Post Studio course at Cal Arts, where he teaches David Salle, Jack Goldstein, James Welling, and others who will later move to SoHo and participate in New York’s eighties art boom.

Judy Chicago in the first Feminist Studio Workshop brochure, 19731972
Judy Chicago and Miriam Schapiro open Womanhouse, a Hollywood mansion in which 17 female artists receive rooms to do what they want with, turning L.A. into a mecca for feminist art.

1974
To critique the assumption that all Mexican-American artists are muralists, members of the performance-art collective Asco create an “instant mural” by taping themselves to the exterior of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

1979
Robert Williams coins the term lowbrow art to describe L.A. skate and surf culture’s mix of graffiti, cartooning, illustration, tattoo art, and custom car painting, later founding Juxtapoz magazine to celebrate it.

It Terrifies Me. . ., 1980, Raymond Pettibon1992
The Museum of Contemporary Art’s sex-and-violence-filled “Helter Skelter: L.A. Art in the 1990s” transforms the city’s sunny reputation, making stars of Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon, Mike Kelley, and Charles Ray.

2003
Heavyweight dealers Blum & Poe open on La Cienega Boulevard, signaling the arrival of Culver City as a major arts center.

Read More http://www.details.com/style-advice/tech-and-design/201109/los-angeles-art-scene-pacific-standard-time-curator-andrew-perchuk#ixzz2p5Wkg8UM

Read More http://www.details.com/style-advice/tech-and-design/201109/los-angeles-art-scene-pacific-standard-time-curator-andrew-perchuk#ixzz2p5WbRTQu

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http://hyperallergic.com/59017/now-dig-this-moma-ps1/

Museums

The Fantastic and Revelatory Story of Art and Black LA

The introduction to "Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980"

The introduction to “Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980″ (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic)

On first glance, some may wonder why MoMA PS1, a New York contemporary art museum, has just opened a historical exhibition of art from Los Angeles. But as MoMA PS1 curator Peter Eleey explained at the press preview last week, the show in question, Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980, actually has a connection to the New York institution: many of the artists in the exhibition eventually migrated from LA to New York, and some of the art on view was actually shown there in the 1980s. “It’s nice to be able to show historical work here, to be able to choose things that reflect the founding period” of the museum, Eleey said.

Kellie Jones speaking at the press preview

All of that is well and good, and convincing, too, but in the end it hardly matters at all. Once you step inside the exhibition, you realize that Now Dig This! is so good — so well-curated, so full of fantastic art, so revelatory — that it was worth bringing to New York no matter what. I suspect that even for those MoMA and MoMA PS1 staffers who worked to get it here, the power of the exhibition came first, the connection to PS1 second.

Now Dig This! was originally organized by art historian and Columbia University professor Kellie Jones for the Getty Foundation’s LA art blowout Pacific Standard Time, which involved more 60 cultural institutions from Southern California mounting more than 60 shows about art made in and around LA between 1945 and 1980. It was originally shown at the Hammer Museum and only closed on January 8, meaning the MoMA and PS1 curators managed to bring it here in less than a year. It’s also one of the only shows (at least so far) to travel.

It’s not hard to see why. Amid the grand narrative of postwar LA art painted by Pacific Standard Time, Jones has zoomed in on one specific subset: the black artistic communities (and she takes this to mean the communities as a whole, including participants and friends of other cultural groups) in the city during a two-decade period. But once you get inside the smaller piece she’s broken off, you realize that she’s actually widened the art-historical narrative. She’s blown shit wide open.

Dan Concholar, "Suitcase"

Dan Concholar, “Suitcase” (1980)

The art on view here — 140 works by 33 artists — is sophisticated, playful, thoughtful, political, and beautiful. It’s minimalist and Pop, abstract and figurative, made of found materials and welded steel. It may sound naive or even condescending to marvel at the diversity of it, but it’s the volume and diversity that, when combined with the high quality of the art as well as the little attention it’s received, make the show so profound. In one of the galleries, there is a suitcase spread open on a white platform, its archival contents — magazines, slides, envelopes, artwork — splayed out in and around it. The suitcase, the wall text tells us, is an installation by Dan Concholar but actually belonged to Charles White, one of artists in the “Front Runners” section of the exhibition. It was discovered not too long ago in the archives of Just Above Midtown gallery with unseen artwork by George Clack and Ruth G. Waddy inside it. That suitcase is a microcosm of the entire show.

The exhibition is organized in five sections — “Front Runners,” “Assembling,” “Artists/Gallerists,” “Postminimal Art and Performance,” and “Los Angeles Snapshot/Friends.” As some of those titles suggest, the real underlying subject here, and the reason why the show hangs together so well, is that this is as much a historical exhibition about communities as it is a display of individual art objects.

Charles White, "Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)"

Charles White, “Black Pope (Sandwich Board Man)” (detail) (1873)

A sculpture by Melvin Edwards

The show opens with a gallery of work by some of the precedent setters, among them social realist drawings by figurehead Charles White and deeply evocative steel sculptures by Melvin Edwards, the pair of which immediately demonstrates the different ways that art can be political. From there, a stunning room full of assemblages by Betye Saar and John Outterbridge mixes motifs, mediums, and high and low art, the artists drawing on voodoo, traditional African patterns, junk art, Rauschenberg’s confines, and much more. The pieces seem to be carrying on a charged conversation of their own — one that bleeds over into the next room, where more assemblages by Dale Brockman Davis and Noah Purifoy pick up on Saar’s and Outterbridge’s visual themes and inspirations. The gritty but often colorful aesthetic of those works resonates with John T. Riddle’s biting (in subject matter) yet playful (in appearance) metal sculptures, also on view in that gallery.

Work by John Outterbridge (foreground) and Noah Purifoy (background)

John T. Riddle, "Gradual Troop Withdrawal"

John T. Riddle, “Gradual Troop Withdrawal” (1970)

Another two rooms down the line, you’re reminded of the political and social roots of much of this work — although you might just call those roots “life” — when you watch footage from the 1972 Watts Summer Festival and meet African-American kids from the neighborhood who turned their energy and frustration into artwork. This was something that the bonafide artists in Now Dig This! did, too, as Jones explained at the press preview: Purifoy was the first director of the Watts Towers Art Center, and he organized a show after the Watts Rebellion of artists making work from the rubble.

Marie Johnson Calloway, "School Crossing Guard"

Marie Johnson Calloway, “School Crossing Guard” (1970s)

The next room picks up on this idea of local spaces and community, focusing on artists who opened up their own spaces and used the galleries as meeting places. “When people don’t show your work, you show it on your own,” Jones had said. Not only that, but you write your own history, which is what people like Samella Lewis and Ruth Waddy did. Lewis is an artist (a few strong lithographs on view in the first gallery) and art historian who founded the quarterly Black Art in 1976 and published, with Waddy, also an artist, the two-volume Black Artists on Art in 1969 and 1971.

A wall of work by Elizabeth Leigh-Taylor, Samella Lewis, William Pajaud, Ruth Waddy, and Tyrus Wong

Suzanne Jackson, "Apparitional Visitations"

Suzanne Jackson, “Apparitional Visitations” (1973)

The last two rooms of the show focus on postminimal art and performance, moving into more well-known territory with a selection of work by David Hammons alongside a handful others. But Hammons’s art looks different here — it has gained a broader and stronger context and seems to emerge organically from what’s come before. At the press preview Jones told an anecdote about Hammons: at one point he apparently said that he hadn’t known any African-American artists before he met Charles White. Today, Jones pointed out, young African-American artists don’t have the same problem; they know their history. And fortunately for them, but more importantly all of us, we now know even more of it.

David Hammons, "Bag Lady in Flight"

David Hammons, “Bag Lady in Flight” (1970s, reconstructed 1990s)

Foreground: Maren Hassinger, “Place for Nature” (2011); background: Senga Nengudi, “Only Love Saves the Day” (2011)

Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980 is on view at MoMA PS1 (22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, Queens) through March 11, 2013.

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NYTIMES

Art Review

A New Pin on the Art Map

Left, photograph by Pablo Mason, Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society; right, Harry Gamboa/Museum of Latin American Art

Bruce Nauman’s “Green Light Corridor” (1970), left, and Harry Gamboa Jr.’s “Tree in the Galaxie” (1978). More Photos »

Published: November 10, 2011

LOS ANGELES — The postwar art of Southern California is a house with many mansions, a great number of which are now open for viewing. I refer of course to the cacophonous, synergistic, sometimes bizarre colossus of exhibitions known as “Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980,” which is rampant throughout the Los Angeles region.

Multimedia

It sharply divides our knowledge of postwar art — not just Californian but American — into two periods: before and after “Pacific Standard Time.” Before, we knew a lot, and that lot tended to greatly favor New York. A few Los Angeles artists were highly visible and unanimously revered, namely Ed Ruscha and other denizens of the Ferus Gallery, that supercool locus of the Los Angeles art scene in the 1960s, plus Bruce Nauman and Chris Burden, but that was about it. After, we know a whole lot more, and the balance is much more even. One of the many messages delivered by this profusion of what will eventually be nearly 70 museum exhibitions is that New York did not act alone in the postwar era. And neither did those fabulous Ferus boys.

Los Angeles may have entered the postwar years with little to speak of in the way of a contemporary art world, but within a decade it was more than making up for lost time. The oft-cited litany of factors contributing to this explosion of art making includes the region’s light, the spaciousness, the cheap rents, Hollywood, the aerospace industry, the car culture, a handful of groundbreaking exhibitions in the ’60s at the Pasadena Art Museum, and the increasingly influential art schools. (There were also the harsh, sometimes galvanizing inequities of the city, especially as experienced by those living in the ghettos and barrios of South Central and East Los Angeles.)

Today Los Angeles has museums and galleries galore, and generations of artistic talent to showcase. And above all — and above it all — it has the Getty Center, on its Brentwood hilltop, which underwrote the project to the tune of about $10 million. Parceled out, the Getty’s largess enabled scores of institutions to mount exhibitions excavating and retrieving one portion or another of the area’s rich recent cultural past.

During my 5 days here I crammed in about 10 days’ worth of art viewing, with visits to some 35 shows in museums, alternative spaces and a few of the commercial galleries that joined the fray.

It was like moving among linked sites on a real-world information superhighway. Exhibitions veered from dense displays of archival documents to elegantly spacious presentations of artworks, all complementing, amplifying and contradicting one another, highlighting the contributions of African-American and Mexican-American artists, the effects of feminism and the proliferation of art forms like assemblage, ceramics and photography. Certain artists and events put in repeat appearances, seen from new angles or within different narratives. And amid it all, a few overarching ideas emerged.

THE CENTER CANNOT HOLD

The great thing about “Pacific Standard Time” is that as more and more institutions got involved, the Getty loosened its grip, and the project morphed into something whose revelations no one could have predicted. But both the older, neater version of Los Angeles’s postwar art history and hints of the messier one emerging from the surrounding shows are encapsulated in the Getty’s own “Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture 1950-1970.” In a highly compressed fashion (read: crowded, too small and weirdly canonical), the show rehearses the well-known (read: too white and too male) ’60s narrative of found-object assemblage, sleek, abstract Finish Fetish sculpture painting, Pop Art and illusionistic Light and Space work, adding some new twists to the story.

In the first gallery the narrative backs up to the late 1950s, reviewing the alacrity with which ceramics artists like John Mason, Peter Voulkos, Ken Price and Henry Takemoto responded to the liberating scale and gesture of Abstract Expressionism in aggressive, often monumental clay sculptures and reliefs, even as some painters, like John McLaughlin, emphatically ignored it, fashioning pristine atmospheric geometries that set the stage for the Light and Space generation.

The show goes on to establish that assemblage was, from the start, a mixed-race endeavor, pursued by white artists like Ed Kienholz, Wallace Berman and Llyn Foulkes, but also by black ones like Melvin Edwards, Ed Bereal, Noah Purifoy and Betye Saar (as well as the Japanese-American Ron Miyashiro). Next the Finish Fetish section includes a decoratively painted car hood from 1964 by the feminist pioneer Judy Chicago. The show continues to the brink of Conceptual Art with a painted word painting from the late 1960s by John Baldessari and concludes with a photograph of Simon Rodia’s Watts Towers, whose mosaic-covered spires are a monumental ode to outsider art and assemblage.

For an illuminating footnote to the Getty show, “Artistic Evolution: Southern California Artists at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 1945-1963,” a small exhibition at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in Exposition Park, celebrates the annual juried art shows for local artists held there starting in the 1940s. Just about everyone who became anyone submitted work; the sampling here includes little-known early Abstract Expressionist paintings by Robert Irwin and Mr. Baldessari.

DEEPER AND WIDER

Other shows enlarge upon the different aspects of the Getty show with visionary force. Distributed among the three sites of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the impeccable “Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface,” traces the dematerialization of Finish Fetish sculpture into the perceptual etherealities of Light and Space art. It includes a capsule survey of Larry Bell’s early progress from geometric painting to glass-box sculptures, as well as the luminous paintings and installations of Douglas Wheeler and Mary Corse and the translucent resin sculptures of Helen Pashgian and DeWain Valentine. And, in a narrow corridor piece by Mr. Nauman, light and space turn psychological and claustrophobic. It certainly doesn’t hurt that the museum’s main building, in La Jolla, sits on the edge of the light and space of the Pacific.

A visionary power of a gritty, urban sort permeates “Now Dig This: Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960-1980,” a beautiful show at the Hammer Museum at the University of California, Los Angeles. This exhibition examines the rich art scene that emerged in the early 1960s in South Central, revealing how a host of mostly but not always black artists explored assemblage’s special capacities to fuse medium and message, in some cases inspired by the trauma of the 1965 Watts riots.

Mr. Edwards’s fierce welded scrap assemblage-sculptures are seen again here, as are Ms. Saar’s poetic recylings of image and object, joined by the efforts of a dozen or so more artists, including the macabre doll-like sculptures of John Outterbridge, and the brooding reliefs of Alonzo Davis. The exhibition also reveals how assemblage was further transformed in the early 1970s by performance-oriented installations of found objects by Senga Nengudi, Maren Hassinger and David Hammons.

The Hammer show is itself placed in even broader context by “Places of Validation,: Art and Progression,” at the California African American Museum, back in Exposition Park. Its nearly 90 artists include half of those at the Hammer, with especially impressive pieces by Mr. Hammons and Mr. Purifoy.

(An apotheosis of assemblage as medium and message is on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, in Kienholz’s wrenching, incendiary “Five-Car Stud” made from 1969 to ’72. The stark nighttime tableau of life-size figures and real cars, which depicts the castration of a black man by six white men while Delta blues plays on the radio of the victim’s pickup truck and, inside it, his white female companion looks on in horror. The piece was exhibited previously only once, at the 1972 “Documenta 5” in Germany.)

Southern California is showcased as an epicenter of feminist art in “Doin’ It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman’s Building” in a cavernous gallery at the Otis College of Art and Design near Los Angeles Airport. A deluge of mostly archival material — pamphlets, broadsheets, posters, documents, photographs, videos — with only occasional artworks, its main focus is the evolution of consciousness and collective spaces that culminated in the Woman’s Building, founded in Los Angeles in 1973 by Judy Chicago, the designer Sheila Levrant de Bretteville and the art historian Arlene Raven. That, and the array of further activism, feminist art and outreach programs that the Woman’s Building fostered during its 18-year existence. This is the kind of show that I once would have said would make a better book than exhibition, and it comes with two very fine volumes. But nothing beats wading through the array of documentary evidence for a visceral sense of the passions, hard work, ingenuity, commitment and very real changes that these women wrought.

FORM AND FUNCTION

While prominently placed at the Getty, ceramics had only a few echoes among the “Pacific Standard Time” shows that I saw — but that will soon change. “Common Ground: Ceramics in Southern California, 1945-1975,” opening on Saturday at the American Museum of Ceramics Art in Pomona, with some 300 variously functional, abstract and decorative works by around 50 artists. And among the second wave of shows opening in January is the more focused “Clay’s Tectonic Shift: Peter Voulkos, John Mason and Ken Price” at Scripps College in Claremont, accompanied by a catalog that traces the Ferus Gallery’s often ignored promotion of ceramic artists like Mason in the late ’50s.

Ceramics do have one stunning moment in the current lineup: the survey of the potter Beatrice Wood (1893-1998) at the Santa Monica Museum of Art. A confidante of Marcel Duchamp during his New York Dada days in the late 1910s, Wood moved to Los Angeles in 1928 and gravitated slowly to clay. In an instance of late blooming that more or less coincided with the growth of studio ceramics in Southern California, she became a potter of distinction, reaching maturity in the 1960s with clunky lusterware chalices and goblets. Their brash yet subtle iridescent surfaces look spectacular beneath the Santa Monica museum’s skylights. Wood’s indifference to the niceties of craft give her forms a roguish humor and sculptural force comparable to those of the Italian modernist Lucio Fontana’s (quite different) works in clay. Meanwhile functional ceramics as well as the sculptural kind are plentiful in “California Design 1930-1965: ‘Living in a Modern Way’ ” at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where a wall label notes Voulkos’s influential (and controversial) pronouncement in the 1950s that his efforts were art, not craft. The design-theme equivalent of the Getty show, this dense, meandering homage to California’s considerable influence on American lifestyle also encompasses furniture, textiles, fashion, industrial and graphic design as well as the emblematic living room of Charles and Ray Eames, available in its entirety because the Eames house-museum in Pacific Palisades is undergoing restoration.

The onslaught of the county museum show finds a highly focused counterpoint in “Eames Words” at the fledgling Architecture and Design Museum, in a climate-control-free storefront across the street. All but devoid of art, the show succeeds on sheer curatorial imagination. With quotations from the Eameses displayed across walls, a few films and some alluring displays of everyday objects and raw materials, it is like being inside the designers’ heads.

VIVA MÉXICO

Five eye-opening exhibitions that together highlight the work of Mexican-Americans — as well as the Mexican influence on the region’s visual culture — suggest that one of the richest veins running through postwar Southern California art is the Mexican-American one. And still these shows leave you with the suspicion that the surface has barely been scratched.

At the Autry National Center in Griffiths Park, “Art Along the Hyphen: The Mexican-American Generation” is devoted to mostly realist painting and sculpture by six Angeleno artists (from three generations, actually). The works range in date from 1906 to the 1970s, with high points including the beautifully reserved still lifes of Eduardo Carrillo (1937-1997).

At the Fowler Museum at the University of California, Los Angeles, the photographs of Oscar Castillo offer a stirring photojournalistic account of Mexican-American life in Los Angeles in the 1970s, while “Mapping Another L.A.: The Chicano Art Movement” sweeps through paintings, drawings, mural art, political posters and punk music. It also includes Asco, the subversive Chicano collective of the 1970s, whose founding members — Harry Gamboa Jr., Willie Herrón, Gronk and Patssi Valdez — dissented from the more decorous and familiar forms of Chicano art with openly rebellious hit-and-run street performances and other actions.

Asco really gets its due in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s “Asco: The Elite of the Obscure,” where it s combination of incisive satire, attitude and style is preserved in images that presage post modern set-up photography and appropriation art. And the artists of Asco also figure, both collectively and individually, in the amazing if disjointed “MEX/L.A.: ‘Mexican’ Modernism(s) in Los Angeles, 1930-1985” at the Museum of Latin American Art, which was established 15 years ago in a former bowling alley in Long Beach. Opening with a fabulously customized lowrider from 1970 by Jesse Valdez Jr., this exhibition reaches back to before World War II with drawings by Mexican muralists José Clemente Orozco and David Alfaro Siqueiros.

Its wide net includes all kinds of artists influenced by Mexican culture (Frank Lloyd Wright, the Eameses, Walt Disney), and encompasses the photographer Graciela Iturbide, the great outsider Martin Ramirez and recent Conceptualists like Guillermo Gómez-Peña. One telling resurrection is Alfredo Ramos Martínez (1871-1946), whose politically pointed paintings from the late ’30s of rope-bound Mexicans were executed on pages taken from newspapers, a strategy that presages similar works by Adrian Piper 30 years later. Among the most exciting, open-ended achievements of “Pacific Standard Time,” this rambunctious show should inspire a larger, even more omnivorous one.

THE PHOTO-CONCEPTUAL EXPLOSION

Another insistent strain in much of “Pacific Standard Time” is photography and its constantly mutating role in Conceptual Art starting in the early ’70s. Among the several worthy gallery shows up during my visit, the most impressive was the near total re-creation, at Cherry and Martin, a gallery on La Cienega Boulevard, of “Photography into Sculpture,” a 1970 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York that included numerous Los Angeles artists who were exploring three-dimensional uses of photographs. (Two early innovators in this area are the subject of their own show, “Speaking in Tongues: The Art of Wallace Berman and Robert Heinecken” at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena.)

The metastasizing of photography (and also video) is a central component in two immense exhibitions, which also go beyond the Southern California focus of “Pacific Standard Time” to address the perennial art historical imbalance between Los Angeles and San Francisco. In Newport Beach, the Orange County Museum of Art’s “State of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970” is a dense, seemingly encyclopedic presentation of Conceptual Art from up and down the coast, shot through with various forms of satire, political fury and emotional vulnerability. Organized with the Berkeley Art Museum, where it will open in late February, it presents works by some 50 artists and artist collectives and resurrects numerous forgotten talents while deepening appreciation of more familiar ones.

An interesting minor sidebar to this exhibition — and also to the women’s show at Otis — is “She Accepts the Proposition: Women Gallerists and the Redefinition of Art in Los Angeles, 1967-1978” at the Crossroads School in Santa Monica. Conceived as a corrective to the view that male curators and art dealers did all the heavy lifting in Los Angeles, it centers on five female art dealers who mounted pioneering shows of installation, conceptual and video art. The Getty should offer grant support for a catalog for this show, which is a gem.

The other immense show that is rife with (although hardly limited to) photo-based work is the baleful, ambitious “Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974-1981,” at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles organized by Paul Schimmel, its chief curator.

An instance of curatorial imperiousness that makes few concessions to viewer stamina, it represent some 140 artists with nearly 500 artworks, spanning the years between two Californian presidencies — from Richard M. Nixon’s resignation to the inauguration of Ronald Reagan — and charting what might be called the beginning of the breakdown of the American Dream that owed so much to California.

It opens with a haunting juxtaposition of Robert Arneson’s monumental 1981 bust of San Francisco’s assassinated mayor, George Moscone, and several paintings by Mr. Foulkes that riff with Baconesque defacements on official, implicitly presidential portraiture. In effect this exhibition “samples” work from almost every other show in “Pacific Standard Time.” It contains paintings by Mr. Ruscha, Chicano posters and mural drawings, one of Mr. Outterbridge’s wicked dolls and just about every artist, it sometimes seems, in the “State of Mind” show. Its breadth of vision is breathtaking, but it also flattens the art. One can’t help but feel that the “big black sun” may be Mr. Schimmel himself.

EXPLODING ART HISTORY

“Pacific Standard Time” has been touted as rewriting history. It seems equally plausible to say that it simply explodes it, revealing the immensity of art before the narrowing and ordering of the historicizing process. Taken together, its shows may be the next best thing to being there the first time around, or maybe even better: they surely reveal more than any single individual living through these times could have seen or known about.

To a great extent this epic of exhibitions reflect our moment’s broader historical attitude, which might be characterized as No Artist Left Behind. Anyone who made art at a given moment is eligible to be part of the history of that moment. It’s expansive and inclusive and also reminds of me of Lewis Carroll’s imaginary full-scale map, which was meant to be as large as the area it charted.

“Pacific Standard Time” is a great argument for museums concentrating first and foremost on local history, for a kind of cosmopolitan regionalism, if you will. It sets an example that other curators in other cities should follow, beginning in my mind with Chicago and San Francisco. If America has more than one art capital, it probably has more than two.

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Temporary Art Review is a platform for contemporary art criticism that focuses on alternative spaces and critical exchange among disparate art communities. Temporary is a national network, highlighting both practical and theoretical discourse through exhibition reviews, interviews, essays and profiles on artist-run spaces and projects.

Weegee. The Gold Painted Stripper, 1950.

The LA Galaxy

What immediately struck me on visiting the various outposts of Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945 – 1980, a catchall label for approximately 60 shows dotted around Southern California, was the existence of artists I barely registered, or even heard of, while studying–and otherwise living–in LA for over a decade (1993-2004). I felt like a prodigal astronaut returning to a home planet, only to find the planet wasn’t at all how I remembered it. My ignorance, dear reader, ought to be pardoned because LA’s art production resembles nothing less than a galaxy of 100 billion stars, 100,000 light years wide, bulging in the middle 16,000 light years thick.

All the familiar stars in the familiar constellations were there at the Getty’s four exhibits and MOCA’s Under the Big Black Sun: Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Chris Burden, Ed Ruscha, John Baldessari, Richard Diebenkorn and David Hockney. Some of my school chums worked in these star’s studios and went on to form a second, third and fourth generation of LA art production. These inclusions dutifully mapped out the heavens as well as any astronomy textbook might be expected to do so.

However, more obscure light and space artists like DeWain Valentine, with his six-ton resin monolith sculpture, Gray Column (1975-76), or conceptual painter Joe Goode, whose burned and cut-up canvases–such as Torn Cloud 73 (1972)–had been on the periphery of my consciousness at the time, steal the show at the Getty. These figures also seem to anticipate the rise of “corporate-abstractionist” art, by the likes of New York’s Garth Weiser, or environmental artists, like Olafur Eliasson, working decades later and are perhaps more relevant to today’s painters and sculptors than their more famous cool school colleagues. The curators at work here are justifiably redefining the recent past.

Celestial bodies just outside the acceptable charmed solar systems of the art world explode conventional notions of how LA art got to be the way it is today. Turns out that Weegee called LA home for a time and produced a massive corpus of work there. Weegee’s crass sense of humor displayed in Naked Hollywood, MOCA’s extensive survey of his grotesque starlettes, comical drunks and hysterical fans, successfully tops everything shown at Under The Big Black Sun. Indeed, it suggests Weegee was the original bad boy of LA art. With a crooked smile and a sardonic eye for the foibles of the everyday Angeleno, Weegee identified LA as “Newark with Palm Trees,” and he proved it–his camera doesn’t lie. Even if it was a bit vindictive, Weegee documented the golden age of LA with all its blemishes.

Then the redefinition gets more complicated–LA has a multicultural art history, too. The Hammer’s Now Dig This!, curated by Kellie Jones surveys the production of African-American art in approximately the same period–1960 to 1980. Her work serves as an archaeological dig to an almost lost world. Neglected reputations resurrected for a broader public include: Daniel LaRue Johnson, Melvin Edwards, John Outterbridge, along with the better know artists David Hammons and Betye Saar. (Expect to see this show roll up in New York sooner rather than later.) UCLA’s Fowler Museum and LACMA flesh out the Chicano scene. Judith Baca, Carlos Alvarez, Gronk and ASCO present a completely different LA from the one you see in the movies–you will not be disappointed.

If you catch the various exhibits, ponder the magic of a city that rips down and reinvents itself every decade, like a supernova flaring up and burning out. Just remember you are standing in a city that’s evolving, revolving at 900 miles an hour, moving at a million miles a day, in an outer spiral orb, at 40,000 miles an hour, of a galaxy, we call–LA.

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Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945 – 1980 is a collaboration of more than sixty cultural institutions across Southern California from October 2011 until April 2012.
For more information please see www.pacificstandardtime.org


Daniel McGrath, St. Louis: contributor
Daniel McGrath is co-director of Isolation Room/Gallery Kit, was co-director of Sweetboy Projects in Los Angeles and has organized exhibitions in St. Louis and the United Kingdom. He is a contributing art writer for Art US, Review Magazine and St. Louis Magazine. He has exhibited his work at Hunter College MFA Studios, New York; Office Space, Los Angeles; SweetboyProjects, Los Angeles; Pirate, Burford, UK; PSTL and Hunt Gallery, St. Louis. He lives and works between Oxford, UK and St. Louis, MO.

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Wall Street Journal

Architecture

A Celebration of Days Gone By

Updated July 24, 2013 5:52 a.m. ET

Los Angeles

The City of Angels has entered the awkward years: no longer young and fresh, not yet old and wise, but now very determined to be taken seriously.

‘Department of Water and Power Building at Night’ (1965). J. Paul Getty Trust/Julius Shulman

Last year’s expansive “Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980” included more than 60 exhibitions scattered around Southern California. This summer’s “Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.” is smaller but just as ambitious, encompassing some nine institutions with a broadly defined aim to prove that Los Angeles is a fountainhead of modern architectural innovation and creativity.

It’s a rhetorical effort, in part misaimed. First, the postwar period covered by the exhibitions bypasses the heyday of early modernism in America and the hugely influential houses by celebrated architects Rudolph Schindler, Richard Neutra and Frank Lloyd Wright, whose sublime renditions of climate-friendly modernism such as Wright’s Hollyhock House and Neutra’s Lovell House constitute some of the earliest original designwork to come out of Los Angeles. But organizers wanted a time frame that would parallel last year’s “Pacific Standard Time” art exhibitions and also focus on a less familiar period.

More pointedly, the famously capricious Wright may have dismissed Los Angeles as a “common place” and said that if one tipped the world over, everything loose would land here, but it’s been a long time since anyone disputed the city’s status as a 20th-century design mecca.

Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

Various venues

pacificstandardtimepresents.org

The stars aligned to trigger the postwar boom—including a full-fledged aerospace and aviation industry tapping into free-flowing federal funds; a tradition of concentrated power (adapted from Mission days) well suited to the new oil and automobile tycoons; and a supporting cast of Hollywood fantasists, ready-for-hire immigrants and newly arrived searchers for a better life. One developer, Kaiser Community Homes, a former defense contractor, was building 40 houses a day in the postwar years.

“Pacific Standard Time Presents,” sponsored by The Getty, expends much effort debunking the image of Los Angeles as a car-riddled, concrete-padded valley of cloudless despair (or, as Don Draper in “Mad Men” put it, “Detroit with palm trees”). The two major exhibitions, “Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940-1990” at the J. Paul Getty Museum and the controversial off-and-on-again “New Sculpturalism” show at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (through Sept. 16) made excellent bookends. (Frank Gehry nearly scuttled the MOCA show by pulling out but was coaxed to return with a new project in China installed its own way in a separate room.)

While “Overdrive” ended abruptly in 1990 for no compelling reason, the MOCA exhibition takes up the torch for all things contemporary, although largely ignoring today’s hot topics of landscape and sustainability. Both draw attention to the high level of concentrated planning and technical innovation underpinning the growth of modern Los Angeles.

People love the Googies, those idiosyncratic roadside attractions seemingly shaped by the whizz of cars— John Lautner, that master of exaggerated form, designed the first ones for Sunset Boulevard in the late 1940s—but the true feats of audacity were the massive infrastructure projects bringing in water and electricity (including the Owens Valley Aqueduct, still the longest in human history, and the Hoover Dam) and the spirit of experimentation. (For the MOCA show, architects P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S created a “textile room” made of Kevlar-like aramid and black carbon-fiber tape as one of three commissioned pavilions highlighting new talent.)

The Getty’s “Overdrive” was impressively foundational—including gems, from the renderings of 1950s concept cars and construction photographs of Howard Hughes’s mammoth airplane, the Spruce Goose, to the urban development plans rejiggered over decades for the ambitious downtown redevelopment scheme known as Bunker Hill, and an array of pre-Gehry submissions for Walt Disney DIS +0.26% Concert Hall.

And it was overdue. The last comprehensive survey of Los Angeles architecture and design was at the University of California, Santa Barbara, art gallery in 1968.

Neither show is as fun as “Everything Loose Will Land” (through Aug. 4) at the MAK Center for Art and Architecture at the Schindler House in West Hollywood. Just the right size for pleasurable viewing in one of those early-modern masterworks, “Everything Loose” (its name taken from the Wright quip) celebrates the confluence of artists, architects, gutsy entrepreneurs and avant-garde all-sorts who mixed up work and play to world-attracting effect in the 1960s and 1970s.

Consider 1968’s Billy Al Bengston exhibit at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where the works by the surfer-biker-renegade artist was installed by Mr. Gehry and the bolts-and-sandpaper catalog was by Ed Ruscha. Or the Century Square Shopping Center, where in 1968 artists Judy Chicago, Lloyd Hamrol and Eric Orr staged “Disappearing Environments,” which involved 25 tons of dry ice stacked into an ancient-ziggurat shape, lighted with road flares, and left to melt as six women in aluminum suits rolled around aluminum balls. Several balls exploded, christening the event as a true Happening.

Developers selling the American dream of one family/one house/two cars played a huge part in building Los Angeles out rather than up. An exhibition at the Hammer Museum, ” A. Quincy Jones : Building for Better Living” (through Sept. 8), is the first monographic show on the architect who designed some 5,000 houses in the postwar years in league with adventuresome developers, including one of the first Case Study Houses, the widely celebrated experiments in modern house design commissioned by Arts & Architecture magazine and built between 1945 and 1964. But better tract housing could be a hard sell, as is eloquently told through Crestwood Hills, a Waterloo for progressive design. The original plan developed by a cooperative of homeowners to construct 500 affordable homes bogged down when the Federal Housing Authority resisted subsidizing the buildings because of their modern style. Some 100 were finally built and now sell as highly desirable luxury homes.

Visiting all the shows in “Pacific Standard Time Presents” isn’t necessary—or viable for traffic-wary visitors—in order to appreciate all the ways that Los Angeles proved its design worthiness in the second half of the 20th century. But ultimately the carefully curated shows also feel elegiac, their very existence attesting to a heightened self-consciousness at odds with the ad hoc, low budget, under-the-radar energy of a city coming of age. The excitement has moved on to Asia, and with “Pacific Standard Time Presents” we are left with a great slide show looking back.

Ms. Iovine writes about architecture for the Journal

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LA WEEKLY

A Diary of the Getty’s Big, New Exploration of L.A. Architecture

Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging
Charles Phoenix gives a SoCal Modern architecture slideshow at the Getty’s press event

“The San Andreas is not Los Angeles’ only fault,” cracked architectural historian Thomas Hines at the kickoff to Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.. Hines didn’t really mean it — he was quoting a joke that people from, say, San Francisco might make — but the quip hit just the right tone for the Getty’s new initiative, the infinitely more accessible and laid-back architectural sequel to the serious and self-important art world extravaganza Pacific Standard Time.

Also, unlike Pacific Standard Time, Pacific Standard Time Presents — which some people have taken to calling PSTP, even though it sounds like something one might want to clear up with a few doses of Valtrex — has a much more manageable number of exhibitions and events. This intimate scale makes for overlapping and quite personal portraits of these post-war practitioners, many of whom are still working and popping up in person at events around the city. Where, with free champagne in one hand and my iPhone in the other, I plan to stalk them for the next few months.

i-CtfsvFn-L.jpg
Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging
Deborah Sussman and Paul Prejza, with signage they designed for the 1984 Olympics

On the blustery Monday of the Getty’s press conference, the morning’s highlight was Kodachrome master Charles Phoenix, dressed in a red-and-gold getup that seemed Pantone-coded to the midcentury McDonald’s in his slideshow. Other luminaries in attendance included Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa — who notably corrected Getty president Jim Cuno‘s pronunciation of CicLAvia: “It’s Cic-LA-via” — and Eames protégée Deborah Sussman, dressed in an outfit every bit as colorful as her graphics for the 1984 Olympics on display. (Later, for the opening, she changed to black but threw on a fuchsia scarf that matched De Wain Valentine‘s own wrap perfectly.)Milling about the architectural models of the Getty’s show “Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future,” was L.A. Times critic Christopher Hawthorne, who would rightly note in his review that by sticking to the original PST’s timeframe, the Getty’s show ignores modern architecture’s formative years in L.A. But the exhibit is a fun ride nevertheless, from kooky Googie to postmodern pretentiousness, tracking L.A.’s ascent from a laughing-stock roadside attraction to an agenda-setting global architectural leader.

Across the travertine palace is the more intimate “In Focus: Ed Ruscha,” featuring his photography of the more mundane Modern like gas stations and dingbat apartments. Not only is Ed Ruscha still shooting streets a la Every Building on the Sunset Strip, he’s currently working on the part of Mulholland that’s not paved, meaning he (or, actually, an assistant) has to do it on bicycle instead. That’s certainly something that made bike-riding actor Ed Begley Jr. — also seen at the opening later that night — happy.

LACMA
LACMA director Michael Govan talks to an attendee at the opening of “Stephen Prina, As He Remembered It”

Down the hill, LACMA opened the first of its two PSTP shows, with Stephen Prina‘s recreations of built-in furniture from two demolished homes designed by R.M. Schindler. In the pleasantly jarring installation, the furniture is painted Pepto-Bismol pink that Prina recalled from a La Brea furniture store. (Actually, it’s Honeysuckle, Pantone’s 2011 “color of the year.”)

IMG_5693.JPG
Alissa Walker
Eric Owen Moss lectures in the shadow of his Samitaur Tower in Culver City

Later that week, while the Getty and Zocalo pondered “Does Architecture Matter?” — which I would hope it does, if you’re mounting a citywide exhibition about it — KCRW hosted a less existential celebration at the Helms complex. As part of the day’s festivities I led a walking tour of Culver City that visited PSTP peeps like the architect Eric Owen Moss, who gave a lecture (in gym shorts!) at Samitaur Tower in the Hayden Tract of Culver City (the tower is prominently featured in Overdrive).Back at Helms, DnA: Design and Architecture radio show host Frances Anderton moderated panels with PSTP curators Michael Govan, Wim de Wit and Christopher Mount. But the afternoon belonged to Father’s Office restauranteur Sang Yoon, ex-Spago pastry chef Sherry Yard (who are collaborating on a revitalized version of the Helms Bakery) and KCRW’s Evan Kleiman who engaged in a hilarious conversation on modern architecture and food. Major takeaways: Yoon lives in a house by modernist icon Craig Ellwood, no chefs have well-designed home kitchens, and jelly doughnuts are awesome.

Speaking of awesome, add these upcoming events to your datebook: This Saturday is the L.A. Conservancy’s “Venice Eclectic” tour peeking inside Dennis Hopper‘s former residence, Ed Moses‘ studio and the original office of Charles and Ray Eames. Then you can dive deeper into Venice’s Modern legacy with SCI-Arc’s show “A Confederacy of Heretics.” I plan to check it out when I’m at the school for its 40th anniversary bash this Saturday.

Until next time… Stay modern.

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Issue 144 January-February 2012 RSS

Pacific Standard Time

Art

City Report

Stretching across 70 museums and galleries, ‘Pacific Standard Time’ is an unprecedented collaboration that traces different histories of Southern Californian art between 1945 and 1980

image

Robert Kinmont, detail from 8 Natural Handstands, 1969/2009, silver gelatin print

Sam Thorne
Associate editor of frieze, based in London, UK.

Sniping at the Getty’s activities is nothing new. As early as 1977, Joan Didion noted that, ‘From the beginning, the Getty was said to be vulgar […] ritually dismissed as “inauthentic”, although what “authentic” could mean in this context is hard to say.’ So, when ‘Pacific Standard Time’ (PST) – which was initiated and funded by the Getty Foundation – opened at the end of September, the reactions were fun to watch. Taking in around 70 cultural institutions in Southern California, PST is, as the Getty’s catalogue claims, ‘quite possibly the largest visual arts initiative ever’. Discounting New Deal-style programmes, this is surely the case; the collaboration, which runs for almost eight months and focuses on Southern Californian art produced between 1945 and 1980, has few precedents. But there was a derisive note to several of the early responses. Roberta Smith’s review in The New York Times was titled ‘A New Pin on the Art Map’, as though land had just been sighted by pith-helmeted art historians. Condescension was alloyed with the feeling that self-celebration on this scale is gauche or even paranoid – the kind of thing, as Dave Hickey opined, that Denver would do.

Other reactions saw PST as a brazen act of regional boosterism: city-myth production not so different from the antics of Los Angeles’s original boosters – those Downtown bureaucrats and PR men who ruthlessly promoted urban development early last century. But PST is better understood, I think, as recuperative rather than self-promoting, a long-due counterweight to the centrifugal pull of New York in accounts of postwar art in the US. Certainly this is how it was first imagined by the Getty Foundation and the Getty Research Institute in 2001, when the then-unnamed initiative had the relatively modest ambition of locating and preserving the historical record of LA’s art production. This was prompted by a dearth of scholarly books on the subject, made urgent by the fact that many of the artists who had come of age during World War II were growing old. By 2008, what began as an LA-focused archival endeavour had grown to encompass the whole of Southern California and, more dramatically, had developed an extensive exhibition component with a total budget of around US$10 million provided by the Getty. The initiative was to be led by the Getty, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) and the Hammer Museum, but would take in dozens of smaller institutions and alternative, artist-led and commercial spaces.

At this point, any evaluation of PST will be partial in the extreme. This is not only because the programme is less than halfway through, but, with the enormous quantity of background scholarship and parallel publications, a clear sense of its impact is unlikely to be possible for some years. Such is the range and depth of material generated by the Getty’s investment, it’s even likely that our understanding of Southern Californian art will at some point be measured in pre- and post-PST terms. Less optimistically, this one-off cash injection provides a unique opportunity for those institutions which otherwise pay scant attention to marginalized artists to organize something they’d never usually get past the board.

The umbrella title – ‘Pacific Standard Time’ – insinuates a geographical zone that stretches from Vancouver and Seattle to Tijuana, but the focus is almost exclusively on Southern California, with no more than a smattering of Bay Area art. Few people, if any, will be able to see all of these exhibitions, which are clustered in and around LA, but framed by a triangle of outliers a couple of hours’ drive in each direction: down the coast to San Diego, north to Santa Barbara and as far inland as Palm Springs. Over the course of a week, I saw around 25 affiliated exhibitions. Aside from the flagship shows presented by the four lead institutions, these encompassed spaces as diverse as the Robert Venturi-designed Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (MOCASD) and a middle school in Santa Monica, the tiny Craft and Folk Art Museum on Wilshire Boulevard and a lone mezzanine of the Natural History Museum. Exhibitions are intensely varied in approach, including surveys of movements and tendencies – Light & Space and ceramics, as well as Chicano, African-American and feminist artists – and focuses on individuals as diverse as Sam Maloof and Wallace Berman, Fred Eversley and Barbara T. Smith. Others trace the history of specific sites, such as the Watts Towers Art Center, Pomona College, Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions and ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives. Whether a greatest-hits show, like the Getty Center’s flagship ‘Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture, 1950–1970’, or a tiny, gem-like archival offering such as ‘She Accepts the Proposition: Six Women Gallerists, 1967–1977’ at the Crossroads School, the shared 35-year period and SoCal vicinity links these island exhibitions into an archipelago.

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Doug Wheeler DW 68 VEN MCASD 11, 1968/2011, white UV neon light, installation view

There have been a number of major museum surveys of LA art in the last two decades, most notably the Centre Pompidou’s 2006 ‘Los Angeles 1955–1985: Birth of an Art Capital’, which covered a similar period to PST. These exhibitions have tended to present the city as either the polar opposite of New York (a binary Robert Smithson and Nancy Holt were satirizing as early as 1969, in their video East Coast, West Coast), or as a culturally and geographically conflicted anomaly. Implicit in many prominent accounts of LA – from Bertolt Brecht through Reyner Banham to Mike Davis – is its double-status: heaven and hell; Utopia and dystopia. Binary exhibition premises, such as ‘Sunshine & Noir: Art in LA 1960–97’ (1997) at the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark, follow this line of thinking. They counter a caricatured – and persistent – criticism of LA art as unerringly breezy, the kind of interpretation exemplified by a 1970 Artforum review of ‘A Decade of California Color’ at Pace Gallery in New York, in which the critic complained: ‘It is apparently as easy to rack up in Los Angeles as an artist as it is to be a stringer of beads or an importer of herbals.’ More than any other city, art from LA is remarkably still often understood as a primarily localized phenomenon, conditioned by unblinking light, gleaming automobiles – ‘suggestions for colour on wheels’, John McCracken called them – and the lucky proximity to surf-shop resin experiments, craft movements, Hollywood and the aerospace industry.

Instead, PST visualizes a radically subdivided metropolis that makes such binary or localist readings impossible to sustain. For a long time, the narrative has been dominated by the gifted gang of young men – including Billy Al Bengston, Robert Irwin, Ken Price and Ed Ruscha – associated with Ferus Gallery (1957–66), and dubbed the ‘Cool School’ by Philip Leider, who edited Artforum when it was based in LA (Leider had originally wanted the magazine to be called Art West). But, travelling through the PST archipelago, stories become unavoidably more complex, as artists are encountered in wildly different scenes, guises and locales. For example, Bruce Nauman pops up in an exquisite survey of Light & Space at MOCASD as well as in the Orange County Museum of Art’s fascinating overview of conceptual art. Suddenly, the perceptual environments of James Turrell, Eric Orr and Doug Wheeler don’t seem so far removed from the early process-based sculpture of Nauman, Paul McCarthy or Wolfgang Stoerchle, or even from Michael Asher’s first installations. Often-overlooked communities are also well represented: for example, Asco, the Chicano activist art group are given their first retrospective (which is reviewed on page 154 of this issue), while the Hammer has organized ‘Now Dig This!’, a superlative survey of African-American art. The markers that I’d previously used, as only an occasional visitor to LA, to navigate art in the city – Wallace Berman’s obscenity charge in 1957 or the Watts Riots of 1965; John Baldessari cremating his paintings in 1970 or Bas Jan Ader being lost at sea in 1975 – started to become unmoored. If PST has a canonizing impulse, as has been claimed, then it has surely failed. What emerges is so messy and irresolute that the well-told narratives and familiar categories start to break down.

But the framing of PST also reinforces some of the art-historical orthodoxies it is attempting to dispute. ‘Art since 1945’ has been a standard periodization since the 1950s, though I wonder about its particular relevancy to LA. All but a few of the exhibitions in PST feel reluctant to acknowledge the first third of the 35-year period that it has set itself, and none of the key presentations from the four lead institutions touch the art of the ’40s (only the Getty Center’s show strays earlier than 1960). It may be that the main activity in that decade was in the Bay Area rather than in Southern California, and LA’s cultural infrastructure was certainly slow to develop: the Dwan and Ferus galleries didn’t open until towards the end of the ’50s, while the art museums either opened later or – like actor and collector Vincent Price’s Modern Institute of Art in Beverly Hills (1948–9) – were short-lived. In any case, the consistent focus of most exhibitions under the PST umbrella is not 1945–80, but rather the 1960s through to the early ’70s.

One major exhibition – both the biggest and, reputedly, the most expensive that PST has to offer – that does deal with the late ’70s is ‘Under the Big Black Sun’ at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA. The show – which is bracketed by Richard Nixon’s resignation and Ronald Reagan’s ascension – includes masses of extraordinary work, though, in its evocation of a vibrant artistic pluralism, it is exhausting as well as enlightening. Highlights for me included early work by Jeffrey Vallance and Christopher Williams, documentation of performances by Suzanne Lacy and Lynn Hershman, and little-known series by John Divola and Robert Heinecken. The crux of curator Paul Schimmel’s catalogue essay is that the pluralism which ‘cohered as Postmodernism during the 1980s in New York effectively codified ideas and concepts made in California between 1974 and 1981’. To claim this period as a forerunner in any theoretical sense must overlook both European critical theory and New York’s own fertile scene. It’s a claim that doesn’t need to be made. But it is perhaps revealing of how acutely felt the decamping was of the so-called CalArts Mafia – former students of Baldessari, including Jack Goldstein, Matt Mullican and David Salle – from LA to New York in the mid-’70s. This collective move to the East Coast – Douglas Eklund once called it a ‘mass migration’ – marks the diminuendo of one strand of PST.

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Robert Alexander, John Reed, Wallace Berman, Juanita Dixon and Walter Hopps in the alley next to Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, c.1957

Like museums everywhere, institutions in LA are being forced to broker increasingly Faustian pacts with collectors and corporations, but there is surely hope to be gleaned from a collaboration of this scale. For now, whether PST is regionalist, localist or even boosterist may not matter so much. The more pressing issue is how the research and exhibitions that it has produced can be developed. From wherever you’re sitting, its impact is going to be interesting to watch.

Stacey Allan
Executive editor of East of Borneo, a collaborative online art magazine of contemporary art and its history as seen from Los Angeles. She is based in Los Angeles, USA.

Sometime last year, I came across an interview with the nouvelle vague filmmaker Agnes Varda that touched on her time in California in the late 1960s. The reporter writes that Varda is sometimes reproached for missing the events of May ’68 in Paris. She was, at that time, living in Los Angeles with her husband, Jacques Demy, as he directed his first American feature film. When Varda was asked about regrets, I was moved by her elegant and unapologetic response: ‘[In California] we had flower children, we had love-ins and sit-ins and huge free concerts. What we found was a real desire for brotherhood that was magnificent, that wasn’t just about making demands. I wasn’t [in Paris], that’s all there is to it – but I saw things they didn’t see.’

My own sense of ‘Pacific Standard Time’ is that it is best taken as something along these lines: a simple statement of fact that we, in Los Angeles, saw things that others didn’t see. We had Wallace Berman, Womanhouse (an installation/performance space organized by Judy Chicago and Miriam Shapiro in 1972) and plastics. We had the 1965 riots in Watts and we had Wet (1976–81), ‘a magazine of gourmet bathing’. Some outside criticism of the project has framed it competitively, as overcompensation by a city that, compared to New York, has historically been the underdog. But to frame it in this way is to be out of step with a looser local objective: to open up new perspectives that complicate the idea of a singular US art history.

The lack of critical attention focused on LA has been much discussed as something that has positively shaped – and to some degree continues to shape – artistic developments here, affording greater experimentation with less fear of high-visibility failure. It also means that the successes, if viewed in this binary way, have been largely unrecorded. Take the work of Senga Nengudi, for instance, who is included in the Hammer Museum’s exhibition ‘Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980’. Nengudi, working with the collaborative group Studio Z (which included David Hammons, Maren Hassinger, Barbara McCullough, Ulysses Jenkins and others), staged and documented Ceremony for Freeway Fets (1978) – a largely improvised performance ritual with music and costumes – on an ignored patch of land under a freeway overpass. Nengudi used space, but not in the ‘Light & Space’ sense of the word.

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Senga Nengudi Ceremony for Freeway Fets, 1978, performance documentation

One of the great things about LA’s sprawling geography is that it reinforces the feeling that nobody is looking, either literally or critically speaking. For Asco, a Chicano collective comprising a small group of friends from East LA, that invisibility both enabled and inspired theatrical street performances that were later promoted and distributed as ‘No-movies’ – essentially film stills for non-existent Chicano films, starring themselves. If invisible to the culture industry, though, they were certainly not invisible to law enforcement. Many of their works carry the sense of being undertaken quickly while no one was looking. First Supper (After a Major Riot) (1974) took place on a traffic island on Whittier Boulevard in East LA, not long after the Chicano moratorium, when the area was still heavily policed.

There has been some outside debate around PST’s geographical focus on Southern California – rather than encompassing, for instance, the entirety of San Francisco and the Bay Area. But despite the fact that many artists travelled and even lived for a time in both regions – most famously Berman, George Herms and those associated with the Beats – the two have distinct histories. One has to remember that San Francisco is some distance from LA: criticizing the localism of PST is a little like observing that a show about New York doesn’t cover Buffalo. The regionalism of California, one of the largest states in a country the size of the US, is not a great deal different to the regionalism one can find in, for instance, Western Europe.

Regionalism even exists within the city of Los Angeles itself, and this can be felt in the historical positioning of the various institutions involved. One truth about LA is that there has never been one ‘LA art scene’, but many. Artists communities now seem to be organized less geographically than academically: it is not a city where someone might describe themselves as, say, ‘an artist from Topanga’ or ‘an artist from Venice’, so much as whether they went to UCLA or CalArts or Art Center, and who they studied with. While PST may not leave a lasting legacy in terms of more inclusive exhibition programming in the city, my sense is that a lot will change at an academic level in terms of the diversity of scholarship that happens afterwards. As a result, there will hopefully be more access to, and perhaps more pride in, LA’s rich past as it impacts its present and future.

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Artists and volunteers from the Social and Public Art Resource Center working on the Great Wall of Los Angeles mural, 1976, colour photograph

It was recently reported that of the more than 60 exhibitions that have been organized, few will travel and none will travel to New York. Sharon Mizota of the The Los Angeles Times has set about the task of seeing all the exhibitions – which is ambitious and admirable – but even most people here in the city won’t be able to see everything, and so much of the show has been mediated through print, through people’s words and perspectives. Like Los Angeles itself, far fewer people will experience PST than will read about it. In the aftermath of PST, a key part of the show’s legacy – after the billboards and advertisements have disappeared – will be the publications and the availability of new research material.

Sam Thorne and Stacey Allan

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artnet

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L.A. Confidential

PACIFIC STANDARD TIME IN LOS ANGELES GALLERIES
by Hunter Drohojowska-Philp

 Pacific Standard Time (PST), the Getty-funded initiative that’s revitalizing the forgotten cultural beginnings of Southern California, reigns this month in the museums and galleries around Los Angeles. The PST focus on the area’s post-war cultural history has inspired a number of galleries to dig into their inventory to present some very intriguing, even surprising exhibitions.

The Box, an unassuming gallery in Chinatown operated by Mara McCarthy (daughter of performance artist turned sculptor Paul McCarthy), has a well-earned reputation for showing tough-minded art from the recent past. Working with the estate of John Altoon (1925-1969), the extremely popular if mentally unstable artist who showed with Ferus Gallery, McCarthy is presenting 40 examples of Altoon’s hilarious, ribald, unsettling drawings. All are 30 x 40 in. and made between 1966 and 1968, just a year before he died at the age of 43. They hang framed on a single wall.

Rendered in a wriggly black line with the occasional splash of color, Altoon’s women, with long wavy locks and voluptuous builds, enjoy playfully erotic encounters with frogs, elephants, monkeys, pigs and, occasionally, men. The phallus appears as an independent entity: a pole for a clothes line, stuck in a shoe, or a lovable pillar for a woman to hug. A modern François Boucher, Altoon made drawings that appear effortless and ebullient. The drawings are $14,000 each. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art plans a retrospective in 2013.

Also in Chinatown, Thomas Solomon Gallery shows three large-scale collages by Alexis Smith. In the 1970s, at the apex of the Conceptual Art and Women’s Movements, Smith combined both influences with a healthy dose of dry wit. Where others turned to semiotics, she used the texts of Raymond Chandler, incorporating snippets of fortune cookie predictions, playing cards and tiny gold stars.

In this show, an entire wall is given over to Isadora (1980-81), collaged elements on a corrugated paper background printed with blue sea and tan mountains, with real starfish attached to the night sky. The sad but true text details the last days of Isadora Duncan. The price is $100,000. Not for sale is a wall sculpture from 1976 consisting of a Plexiglas box containing a pair of paper coffee cups. One cup is labeled “Think” in big dark letters, while tiny letters on the other read, “He Who Thinks, Drinks from the Cup of Fortune.” That’s something to think about.

Cirrus Gallery offers a retrospective view of its own involvement with contemporary art since its 1970 inception. Owner Jean Milant, who trained as a printmaker with June Wayne’s Tamarind Lithography Workshop, published early editions with Bruce Nauman, John Baldessari and Ed Ruscha. For this show, Milant worked with the young artist and curator Aaron Wrinkle to present a survey of highlights from the gallery’s past, along with work by young artists responding to that history.

The first of a four-part series, this show includes a piece that Baldessari originally conceived for the 1972 Documenta: An etching of a pyramid hangs on a blue wall while a time-delay video of the viewer viewing the piece is projected in an adjacent gallery. (Similar works appeared in his recent retrospective.) Milant also got permission from Ruscha to present in DVD format Premium, the 1971 movie directed by Ruscha and starring Larry Bell, Leon Bing, Tommy Smothers and Rudi Gernreich.

Since the movie usually is only available in 16 mm film, it is more legend than something that is actually seen. Based on a script by Mason Williams, with the deadpan humor that is synonymous with Ruscha’s work around that time, it is a real treat. No spoilers here — but it involves a couple, a date at a seedy hotel, and a large salad. These works are not for sale but other pieces are available.

At David Kordansky Gallery in Culver City, Richard Jackson has built a wild environment of stretched canvases turned inward to form a room that he painted with the brightly colored protractors in the same dimensions and hues as Frank Stella’s decidedly cerebral paintings. Jackson is known for performance-oriented installation that have included painting a large number of canvases and stacking them face down atop one another to build absurd towering structures. This show makes fun of modernist pretensions.

Titled The Little Girl’s Room (2011), here Jackson spattered paint over the walls and floor and onto giant toys, such as a jack-in-the-box, a stuffed clown, a rocking horse and an upended pink pony. The overall impression is one of joyful havoc. This installation is sold in its entirety but other individual pieces are available. Prices range from $70,000 to $750,000.

Jackson’s long friendship with Bruce Nauman comes to mind when viewing Negative Numbers (1970-2011), a pair of translucent porcelain rectangles with black numbers written on them, mounted on a table and lit from behind by electric light. The piece is included in an ambitious if uneven collection of oddities titled “Photography into Sculpture” at Cherry and Martin in Culver City. The show restages Peter Bunnell’s 1970 exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, which included a number of L.A.-based artists.

Jerry McMillan, an exceptional talent in stretching the boundaries of photography from two to three-dimensions, is represented by Three Boxes, each Plexiglas cube containing black-and-white photographs of a navel, belly and pubic hair. It’s already sold, but similar works are available for $30,000-$40,000. A pioneer of such efforts was Robert Heinecken (1931-2006) and this show includes the mysterious Venus Mirrored, layers of black and white film transparencies and Plexiglas. The price range is $40,000-$100,000.

Such objects are rarely seen here in Los Angeles, and Heinecken’s work in particular has sparked a revival of interest. Petzel Gallery in New York and Rhona Hoffman in Chicago have recently shown it, and it is included with that of Wallace Berman at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena. (The Selwyn Gallery, which represents the estate, had a number of Heinecken works made from altered advertising texts and imagery for $8,000 at the Art Platform fair.)

Also in Culver City, Angles Gallery shows the six films of Judy Fiskin, the first time that they have been shown together, as well a selection of her influential and still startling small-format photographs (1982-83) of L.A.’s stucco apartment buildings known as “dingbats.” Why startling? In contrast to almost all photographic work produced today, they are diminutive, just 2¾ inches square, but packed with detail. Their size brings us in for a closer look at the choice of oddly intentional decorative motifs and landscaping for these dumb stucco boxes. Priced at $3,200, these photographs are undervalued treasures.

Later this fall, the Getty Museum is publishing a monograph of her photographs, Some Aesthetic Decisions. Her quirky films, begun in 1997 when a prolonged illness prevented her from continuing to take photographs, question the very nature of esthetic choice and they do so with droll wisdom. 50 Ways to Set the Table, chronicling the decision-making process of a women’s competition at the L.A. County Fair, is art masquerading as a documentary. The films are priced at $5,000 a piece.

Joe Goode’s well-known works, such as a milk bottle placed on a shelf in front of a canvas or a torn blue-sky painting, are included in a number of PST museum exhibitions. But what about the recession-burdened 1970s? In 1978, Goode responded with a stunning series of all-black canvases, painted with evident but subdued brush work, that he slashed and punctured. He did the same with works on paper. Now on view at Michael Kohn Gallery, the paintings are sober but not somber, and evince a compelling gravity.

Goode has a history of painting natural phenomenon such as skies and trees, isolating intense color in a minimal format. These are priced between $85,000 and $100,000, while works on paper are $35,000. Fredericka Hunter of Texas Gallery showed Goode’s new work at Art Platform and recalled showing the “Nightime Series” when it was made. “No one in Texas was buying black paintings,” she laughed.

After darkness comes the light. At Mark Selwyn Fine Art, paintings from the 1950s by Lee Mullican (1919-98) shimmy with effervescence. The artist’s widow Luchita Mullican wrote the introduction to a small catalogue. “The 1950s were very happy times for Lee. It was the beginning of a marriage that would last for half a century. We had our first son, Matt, and life was beautiful and a great adventure.”

Such warm feelings emanate from the paintings, which incorporate all possible shades of gold — marigold, citron, banana, clay. Mullican’s unmistakable patterns are executed with hundreds of tiny lines and dots. Most were drawn from private collections for the show, though two are available, priced at $52,500 each.

The newly renamed Kayne Griffin Corcoran gallery makes public the role of James Corcoran, a private dealer quietly involved in James Turrell’s career for many years. The current show is an overview of the artist’s work, and features two projected light pieces. Carn White (1967) manifests what appears to be a 3D rectangle of brilliant white in a corner of the gallery, a solidity that dissolves upon close inspection. The title of the show, “Present Tense,” also refers to a “Space Division Construction” from 1991, a room containing a red field of light that appears to be two-dimensions but, again, dissolves upon close viewing.

The most recent work, Yukaloo, called a “Wide Glass work,” is a coved wall with a panel of pearly glass using hidden LEDs to glow pale blue at the edges and deep rose toward the center. It appears to hover in space and emits an irresistibly seductive glow. The Turrell works, which typically go for $750,000, are all sold.

All of these artists are featured in one or more of the PST exhibitions in museums yet the galleries offer a more intimate experience and an alternative to the institutional view.

HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP is the author of Rebels in Paradise: The Los Angeles Art Scene and the 1960s (Henry Holt, 2011).

Shotgun Review

From Los Angeles: Selections from Pacific Standard Time

By Shotgun Reviews November 1, 2011

Pacific Standard Time (PST) unites over sixty venues throughout Southern California to address the art scene that emerged there between 1945 and 1980. Edward Kienholz: Five Car Stud 1969–1972, Revisited, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), is the first U.S. public exhibition of Edward Keinholz’s electrifying Five Car Stud (1969–72/2011), which, for me, is the work that conveys the same raw power it did in its initial presentation in Germany nearly forty years ago. Viewers walk within a human-scale installation of inanimate figures in the throes of enacting graphic, racially motivated violence. Car headlights illuminate the scene, while country music provides an eerie background soundtrack. Though it is a fictional depiction representative of racial tensions during the 1960s and ’70s, the work feels anything but distant. Just as Kienholz intended, and to which the curatorial statement alludes, the viewer is implicated. In Speculation: The World of Ed Kienholz, Keith Berwick’s 1971 documentary, which plays in the didactic space outside the installation, Kienholz asks if Berwick will model for one of the perpetrator body molds—a move that visibly unnerves Berwick even as he agrees.

In contrast to LACMA’s less-is-more curatorial model, the Museum of Contemporary Art’s (MOCA) contribution, Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974–1981 attempts to unite over five hundred works by over 130 artists and unfortunately suffers as a result. Though described as a survey and apparently organized thematically, the exhibition proves overwhelming to navigate. While I understand the curatorial impulse to demonstrate a pluralism that speaks to the conflicting cultural zeitgeists during the time period, placement and attention to space is inconsistent in the

Edward-Kienholz-Five-Car-Stud-1969-72-2011

Edward Kienholz. Five Car Stud, 1969–72/2011; multi-media installation; dimensions variable. Courtesy of Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Photo: Tom Vinetz.

exhibition. Chris Burden’s The Reason for the Neutron Bomb (1979) and Eleanor Antin’s The Nurse and the Hijackers (1977) have ample room to breathe, while Betye Saar’s Secrets and Revelations (1980/2011) and John Outterbridge’s Broken Dance, Ethnic Heritage Group (1978–82) are given inappropriate, awkward treatment in corners next to exit doors. (Luckily, both Saar and Outterbridge have an excellent showing in the Hammer Museum’s PST exhibition, Now Dig This!, and Outterbridge’s solo exhibition at LAXART is not to be missed.) Other works that escape suffocation are a smartly grouped set of engaging works by Ilene Segalove, including The Mom Tapes (1974–78) and Carl Cheng’s Natural Museum of Modern Art (1979–80), a coin-operated public artwork originally installed at the Santa Monica Pier. For the price of a quarter, it quietly invites individuals to patronize the creation of an abstract sand sculpture through a sophisticated, mechanized system. It is, in the midst of the dystopian spirit of much of the other work included at MOCA, a reminder of another, more hopeful spirit from that period—both of which PST aims to resurrect.

Pacific Standard Time is on view at various locations throughout Southern California through February 2012.

Edward Kienholz: Five Car Stud 1969–1972, Revisited is on view at Los Angeles County Museum of Art through January 15, 2012.

Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974–1981 is on view at Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles through February 13, 2012.

Susannah Magers is an independent curator currently based in San Francisco. She recently earned her master’s degree in Curatorial Practice from the California College of the Arts.

==Wall Street Journal

Laying Claim to Its Place in the Sun

October 13, 2011

‘Don’t be modest,” says a character in Mark Lee Luther’s 1924 novel, “The Boosters.” “It doesn’t pay. We’re all boosters in Los Angeles.” Alas, the city’s history of one booster campaign after another, from railroads, citrus growers and land salesmen, has left Los Angeles—for all the semitropical metropolis’s futurist gazing into the Pacific sun—with an inferiority complex. Through World War II, Angelenos directed their grousing at that small, snootty, ballet-and-opera city up the coast, San Francisco. More recently, the foil has been New York, and the resentment of Gotham is particularly sharp where modern and contemporary art are concerned. So when the lights were doused Oct. 2 on the gala-opening reception for the huge multi-institutional group of exhibitions that make up “Pacific Standard Time: Art in Los Angeles 1945-1980” and a son et lumière spectacular commenced on every marbled wall of the Getty Center, it wasn’t long before a stentorian voiceover pronounced, “In contrast to New York Expressionism, artists in Southern California . . .”

‘Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas’ (1963) by Ed Ruscha Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College

Indeed, Andrew Perchuk of the Getty Research Institute has said, “For a long time it was thought that if you didn’t have a significant group of Abstract Expressionist paintings like New York or San Francisco, you couldn’t be a major art center.” The result, according to a Getty press release, is that “Southern California gave birth to many of today’s artistic trends—and yet the immensely rich story of how this came about . . . remains largely unknown.” The hoped-for corrective is “Pacific Standard Time,” a Getty-encouraged, Getty-subsidized (nearly $10 million in grants) collaboration among 60 Southern California institutions resulting in a smorgasbord of everything from handcrafted furniture to hard-edge painting, from guerrilla street performances to sculpture in aerospace materials—all made in California over the past 70 years or so—in shows rolling out over the next six months. With a little rental car and a pent-up urge to drive (I’m an Angeleno transplanted to New York a quarter-century ago), I took a look at about a dozen of the first PST shows, dispersed from Pasadena to San Diego.

Details

Pacific Standard Time: Art in Los Angeles 1945-1980

Multiple venues

www.pacificstandardtime.org

PST boasts three centerpiece exhibitions—one at the Getty Museum itself, one at the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego’s two locations, and one at MoCA in downtown Los Angeles. “Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture, 1950-70” (through Feb. 5) at the Getty is an elegant Cliffs Notes introduction. The show includes the sharply poetic, hard-edge abstract paintings (by Frederick Hammersley, Helen Lundeberg and others) that got the Los Angeles scene rolling in the 1950s; a choice selection of spooky assemblages by George Herms, the underknown black artist Ed Bereal (and, as always implicit throughout this account, “and others”); a roomful of big, airy abstract paintings by the not underknown Richard Diebenkorn and Sam Francis, and an assortment of what, back in the day, was called “fantastic object” sculpture in plastic and cast resin by Craig Kauffman and DeWaine Valentine. And what authoritative Los Angeles show could be without an Ed Ruscha “Standard Station” Pop painting? Certainly not the Getty’s table-setter.

‘Cotton Hangup’ (1966), part of Melvin Edwards’s ‘Lynch Fragments’ series Studio Museum in Harlem

“Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface” (through Jan. 22), at both MCASD’s downtown branch and its original La Jolla location, is the most visually satisfying meal on the PST menu. That’s partly because of the nature of the art—lovingly austere and mystically colorful abstract sculpture and atmospheric environments—and partly because the artists (Larry Bell, Mary Corse, Robert Irwin, Craig Kauffman, James Turrell, Doug Wheeler, et al.) were so talented. And boy, were they young! Ms. Corse was only 20 when she ventured into lyrically all-white minimalist paintings (later to be deliciously complicated by the inclusion of highway-sign reflectivity) that make Robert Ryman seem like a Victorian schoolmaster by comparison. Kauffman, with his techno-lush plastic reliefs, emerges as the premiere object-maker of 1960s cutting-edge Los Angeles art. And the best works I encountered in my 500-mile pilgrimage were Mr. Turrell’s “Stuck Red” and “Stuck Blue” (both 1970), two brilliant vertical rectangles of light on separated walls. At first you think they’re merely projections, but then . . . sorry, you really have to see them for yourself. Messrs. Irwin, Turrell and Wheeler, in particular, manipulated light and space to create experiences, instead of objects, as works of art. Their pieces were, in my opinion, Southern California’s greatest contributions to art before 1980.

At the other end of the utopia/dystopia spectrum from “Phenomenal” lies curator Paul Schimmel’s “Under the Big Black Sun: California Art 1974-1981” (through Feb. 13) at MoCA. Mr. Schimmel is fond of dark, borrowed titles. In 1992 he appropriated “Helter Skelter” from author Vincent Bugliosi (who borrowed it from mass-murderer Charles Manson, who borrowed it from a Beatles song) for an earlier MoCA anthology show. It too, exuded nasty sex, nasty violence and a generally Punk take on life (and death) in the Golden State. The current show’s title is taken from a song by “X,” the 1970s Los Angeles Punk band. Some of the same artists are back—Richard Jackson with his antipainting pancake stacks of canvases, Paul McCarthy with residue from his scatologically slapstick performances, and Llyn Foulkes with weird Pop-surrealist paintings.

Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego

One trouble with the exhibition is that a good deal of it unironically consists of the same stuff—dry typewritten reports, deadpan photos, graphs and plans and maps, etc.—employed by the art’s targets: corporations, the military and bureaucrats. (A hilarious exception: Jeffrey Vallance’s funeral documents for a dead chicken, a.k.a. “Blinky, the Friendly Hen,” that he bought in a supermarket). Another drawback of “Under the Big Black Sun” is a feeling that the disaffection is forced. CalArts and UCLA (where many of the show’s artists were students or teachers) aren’t the South Bronx. While dress-up abjectness on the part of artists is OK, the art should look genuine. The show seems like “Helter Skelter Lite,” perhaps because it is part of an otherwise upbeat civic initiative on behalf of Los Angeles art. Still, Mr. Schimmel gets credit for pretty much putting the lie to a New York critic’s estimate of the ’70s Los Angeles art scene as solely “hip young dropout types in Venice, Calif., making baubles for the rich.”

Posturing isn’t a problem with what I’d call the “learning shows” that try to correct the shunting aside of women, African-American and Latino artists during PST’s time period. They make fine use of the Getty largesse: bringing in outside scholars to help with the research, publishing fat, informative catalogs, searching out works crucial to the shows’ theses, and—best of all for a viewer—creating first-class installations. “Doin’ It in Public: Feminism and Art at the Woman’s Building” (through Jan. 28) at the Otis College of Art and Design, for instance, would probably be an amen-corner jumble were it not for the time, womanpower and scrutiny the gallery was able to give to wall upon wall, and vitrine upon vitrine, of primary source material from the mid-’70s salad days of the women’s movement in the Los Angeles art world.

Just as female artists had more than qualms about proceeding with business as usual in a male-dominated art world (one straw weighing on the camel’s back was the publication of a 1969 calendar with 12 male artists in their cool cars), black artists in Los Angeles found it difficult to fiddle around with perceptual niceties after Watts burned in 1965. David Hammons, an eventual MacArthur fellow who would decamp for New York in 1974, said “I wish I could make art like [James Turrell’s], but we’re too oppressed for me to be dabbling out there.” Nevertheless, enough solid, beautifully aggressive African-American art was made during a 20-year period in Los Angeles for the Hammer Museum to mount “Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960–1980” (through Jan. 8), the most arresting show outside the centerpiece triumvirate. It contains several rediscoveries, among them assemblagist Noah Purifoy, whose works are certainly ripe for a retrospective. For my money, the small steel “Lynch Fragments” sculptures of the hardly unknown Melvin Edwards (a Guggenheim Fellow and professor emeritus at Rutgers) are the standout works of this exhibition. They’re compactly aggressive welded-steel amalgams of chains, tools and abstract forms whose crisply channeled anger makes “Now Dig This!” one of PST’s best early-round exhibitions.

“MEX/LA: ‘Mexican’ Modernism(s) in Los Angeles 1930-1985” (through Feb. 5) at the capacious Museum of Latin American Art in Long Beach adds to the learning curve. It offers not only requisite glimpses of Mexican-American art, but a prologue of Mexican muralists in California in the ’30s and subsequently influential Anglo artists (such as painter-architect Millard Sheets) who learned so much from them. The show doesn’t shy away from cringe-inducing material—such as clips from Warner Bros.’ “Speedy Gonzalez” cartoons from the ’50s—which makes it a risky, lively mix. “MEX/LA” makes “Asco: Elite of the Obscure, a Retrospective, 1972-1987” (through Dec. 4) at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art look awfully thin by comparison. To be fair, Asco—a Mexican-American artists’ collaborative including Gronk, Harry Gamboa Jr., Willie Herrón and Patssi Valdez—performed such antics as taping Ms. Valdez to a wall as an “instant mural.” You probably had to be there; small photographic mementos of these thumbs in the eye of the art establishment are overwhelmed by the big Lacma galleries.

Your visit to Lacma will be salvaged by “Edward Kienholz: Five Car Stud 1969-1972, Revisited.” It’s the first time this hokey but mesmerizing life-size assemblage depicting a black man’s castration by five rednecks has been shown in the U.S.

Getty money and encouragement has made the installations of some midtier shows first-rate, among them the old costumes and vintage videos of “Los Angeles Goes Live: Performance Art in Southern California 1970-1983” (through Jan. 29) at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, a peaceful refuge on an otherwise semiseedy Hollywood Boulevard, and an exhibition, “Speaking in Tongues: The Art of Wallace Berman and Robert Heinecken, 1961-1976″ (through Jan. 22) at the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena. Berman was a great pioneer assemblagist who made mysterious cabinets with fragments of Hebrew letters and old photographs inside; Heinecken, a not-so-great photographer who turned soft-core porn into montages.

Finally, a mention of “California Design, 1930-1965: ‘Living in a Modern Way,'” at Lacma through March 25. An argument could be made that Southern California’s most significant contribution to modernism besides “Light and Space” art is its own style of industrial design. Bauhaus + beach: Low-lying hi-fi consoles, swoopy chairs, dude-ranch dresses, and those wonderful transparent “Case Study” houses up in the hills.

During my sampling of “Pacific Standard Time,” I saw more than the shows outlined above, but I also missed a few—and obviously I couldn’t check out PST exhibitions not yet open. Nevertheless, my eyes roamed over enough art and plowed through enough catalogs that I can ask a few nettlesome questions about the project. First, how is this vast undertaking supposed to be consumed? The venue of the northernmost PST exhibition, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, is more than 200 miles from MoCA San Diego. Southern California suffers a paucity of public transportation, and the roads are always crammed with cars. A Los Angeles artist remarked to me, “Whenever you get someplace on time on the freeway, you feel like you’ve put something over on somebody.” Only a few dedicated art professionals and academics will manage to see all 70 or so PST exhibitions, and most people only a few.

Second, isn’t PST preaching to the choir? If the Getty and participating institutions want to make the case that modern art in Southern California is right up there with New York’s or anybody else’s, shouldn’t at least the three centerpiece shows be on view at MoMA, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston?

Third, is not PST’s very existence a tacit admission of minor-leagueness? (I spent my childhood in a Los Angeles without major-league baseball and can still remember how having to make do with the old Pacific Coast League rankled the adults.) It’s hard to imagine Chicago, whose postwar art also got short shrift in New-York-centric histories of modern art, mounting a “Central Standard Time” campaign.

Finally, it’s been said that generals always fight the previous war. Command Central at the Getty may not have noticed, but the art world has gone global: There are biennials in Korea and Turkey, a huge production and consumption machine in China, and multizillion-dollar museums rising in the Middle East. Contemporary art from India is the current hot item, and South America is champing at the bit.

Of course, these considerations should be more PST’s than mine. I care about seeing good art—no matter how many Hummers in the left lane slow my pursuit of it—and not so much about grand cultural strategies thought up by grand museums. Being able to gaze upon the most gorgeous object that Judy Chicago, one of the founders of the Women’s Building, ever produced—a painted Corvair car hood at the Getty show—and to look at one of Senga Nengudi’s lovely and prescient stretched-nylon sculptures at the Hammer Museum—these are the kinds of experiences that made my sojourn rewarding. A little boosterism is fine, but in the end, who cares which coast has the art-historical upper hand? It’s the art that counts.

Mr. Plagens, a writer and a painter, is at work on a book about the artist Bruce Nauman, to be published by Phaidon.

Miami Art Basel Countdown Report 2013

  • The art deco Delano Hotel, Miami

    Picture: Rex

The concierges’ guide to Miami         vb

A travel guide to Miami’s best attractions, bars, beaches and experiences, as judged by concierges from the city’s best hotels

By John O’Ceallaigh

November 22, 2013 11:46

On the southern tip of Florida, cosmopolitan and culturally diverse Miami offers much more than reliable warm weather and exceptional beaches. A thriving arts scene that supports events such as Art Basel Miami (this year taking place from December 5-8) and various world-class galleries and museums has allowed the city to assert itself as a cultural capital; an established and hedonistic drinking and dining scene means after-hours entertainment is also to hand. Here concierges from three of Miami’s best hotels give their guides to the city’s standout destinations and experiences.

Sharing their knowledge are:
Pedro Alvarez, head concierge at Delano
Noel Lanza, head concierge at The Ritz-Carlton South Beach
Maite Foriasky, chef concierge at The Setai

 I’m new here. Tell me something people don’t know about Miami.
Pedro:
Miami Beach’s Art Deco District is the first 20th-century neighborhood to be recognized by America’s National Register of Historic Places. It includes 800 structures of historical significance, most built between 1923 and 1943.
Maite: When built, Miami’s Art Deco buildings were painted in pastel colours so their features would show up as different tones of grey in the black and white advertisement photographs of the time.

Which attraction should I definitely make time to see?
Pedro:
Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. It was James Deering’s subtropical winter home in the 1910s and now is a beautifully restored museum and gardens.
Noel: Fairchild Tropical Garden which you may get to by heading south on Old Cutler road. It is home to some of the most unique trees and flowers in the world.
Maite: The famous Wynwood Walls in the Wynwood Art District. The idea of showcasing street art in the area was conceived in 2009 by Tony Goldman, who suggested using the windowless walls of Wynwood’s warehouses as canvases.

Which of the “must-visit” attractions should I avoid?
Pedro:
Ocean Drive at night. The traffic ruins the experience.
Noel: The Bayside district is full of corporate chain restaurants and shops. If you want a nice coffee mug or T shirt, it is a good “attraction”.
Maite: Any and all tours sold on the street; most of these vendors are not licensed guides and a positive, memorable experience is not guaranteed.

Which cultural attraction would you most recommend?
Pedro:
The much anticipated Perez Art Museum Miami.  It should open in a few weeks and it promises to be a great addition to Miami’s cultural life.
Noel: The New World Symphony, Little Havana and its restaurants and Cuban-influenced art galleries. Little Haiti is also a hidden gem.
Maite: I particularly like all the contemporary architecture in Miami; our buildings now have the touch of so many well-known international architects and designers, such as the 1111 Lincoln Road which is a garage by Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron. I also appreciate The Adrienne Arscht Center for Performing Arts designed by famed Argentinian architect Cesar Pelli.

How can I best experience Art Basel Miami Beach?
Pedro:
The best way is to try to get a hold of a VIP Pass to see all of the best exhibits at speed and in comfort.
Noel: Have a strategy with regards to how you will fit all in four days.
Maite: Allocate one full day to spend at the Miami Beach Convention Center to enjoy the monumental collection of cutting-edge pieces and rare works of art. It’s located two blocks west of The Setai, Miami Beach. Take your time perusing through all the aisles of art. Then, be sure to wander through the public areas of Miami Beach where unusual large-scale art pieces dominate and fascinate.

Where can I take the best picture of Miami?
Pedro:
In the Shore Club Penthouse. The view of the water is unforgettable.
Noel: Standing at the precipice of the Rickenbacker Causeway, which is the bridge leading from Brickell to Key Biscayne. If you face north, you can capture downtown, Biscayne Bay, the Port of Miami and South Beach.
Maite: From South Point Park on Miami Beach, where one can see the hotels of South Beach, the Atlantic Ocean, Fisher Island, The Port of Miami and the sun setting behind Miami’s ever-expanding skyline.

I’d like to try something new here – what should I do?
Pedro:
Visit the state’s Everglades National Park. It’s not uncommon to see alligators out sunbathing.
Noel: Yoga at the Wyndwood Walls, a new an upcoming artistic area of Miami. The other participants and yogis are most interesting.
Maite: Many don’t associate Miami with wineries, but a favourite, off-the-beaten-path experience we recommend is tasting the refreshing fruit wine at Schnebly Redland’s Winery in Homestead, which is 50 miles southwest of Miami Beach (on the way to the Florida Everglades). Guests may enjoy wines flavoured with mango, coconut, and guava—the signature fruits of South Florida; or if you prefer beer, they brew coco ale beer. The lush courtyard and natural coral waterfalls will provide a great backdrop for a peaceful afternoon wine tasting.


What’s the most glamorous experience you can have in Miami?
Pedro:
Spend a day in Fisher Island and a night at the Delano Hotel. You’re sure to rub elbows with other glamorous people.
Noel: To attend a gala at the classic and luxurious Biltmore hotel, followed by drinks at Swine in the Coral Gables district.
Maite: Indulge yourself with a ride on a Porsche high-speed boat or spend a leisure day on a luxury yacht, with a massage therapist, yoga instructor or even a private chef on board.

I’d like to buy an unusual souvenir – what do you recommend?
Pedro:
Britto Gallery has really interesting pop art souvenirs. Grab an umbrella to remember the fickle Miami weather.
Noel: A guayabera, which is a type of shirt that’s popular in Latin America.
Maite: Since Miami is home to the everglades, you could pick up some unique alligator souvenirs or visit the Little Havana area for some Cuban collectables.

Tell me a phrase or piece of slang I can use to fit in around here.
Pedro:
“Cafecito”. It’s a Cuban coffee that’s small but strong and you should try ordering it from any of the city’s numerous coffee shops.
Noel: “Dale”, pronounced “dah-lay”. It means “let’s go” in Spanish.
Maite: Don’t be confused if you’re addressed as Mama, Mami or Papi; these are typical South Floridian terms of endearment.

What’s the best restaurant in the city right now?
Pedro:
Zuma is delicious. It’s a modern Japanese restaurant in the Epic hotel.
Noel: After dining at DiLido, here at The Ritz-Carlton, South Beach – the only oceanfront restaurant in South Beach – Ola is a very nice dining establishment with delicious Latin food.
Maite: I’d recommend The Restaurant at The Setai, recently reopened with a new Mediterranean “Sun Coast” cuisine concept, and the popular Setai Grill.

And where’s best for drinks? I don’t want somewhere touristy.
Pedro:
Delano’s pool bar is the perfect place to enjoy a drink during the day.
Noel: The Foxhole on South Beach, which can be hard to find as there are absolutely no signs on the exterior of the building. Also try Blackbird in Brickell, Bardot in Mid-town, and The Local in Coral Gables.
Maite: There’s a hidden gem on Miami Beach called the Broken Shaker, which is a garden lounge featuring specialty handcrafted cocktails with elixirs, syrups, and infusions made from herbs and spices from their garden. It is modestly located in the Free Hand Hostel but offers great ambiance whether you’re on a romantic date or out with a group of friends.

What is Miami’s best nightclub?
Pedro:
Story is newest club in town and brings the best DJ’s to Miami.
Noel: LIV in the Fontainebleau is one of the best nightclubs in the US. It has the most vibrant and beautiful partygoers five days a week days a week. The most famous DJs in the world regularly play there and it’s open until 5am.
Maite: It depends what type of night clubs you are looking for: the most popular are Story and LIV, which are famous for bringing DJs such as Tiesto and David Guetta to Miami. However, you can also experience more intimate nightclubs such as SET and Mynt Lounge, famous for their resident DJs.

What’s the best beach in Miami?
Pedro:
Delano’s beach and the beach from 17th street to 20th street are both pristine and beautiful.
Noel: South Beach stretches nearly 25 blocks. The sand is white, the water is clear and you will see the best and most well-sculpted bodies in the world.
Maite: Miami Beach was originally a mangrove swamp. In its place now stand 15 miles of sparkling white-sand beaches—from upscale Golden Beach right down to upbeat South Beach. Several large beachfront parks are accessible to the public, though the rest of the beach is hemmed in by hotels and condos. I vote South Beach as the best beach – for its magnificent transformation and unbeatable people-watching.

Any beach rules or etiquette I should be aware of?
Pedro:
Don’t bring glass bottles on the beach.
Noel: You can sunbathe topless on South Beach. As long as it’s legal, it’s ok on South Beach.
Maite: The beach rules are quite simple: no glass containers; no dogs; no camping; no guns or explosives; no cooking. Beach patrols usually turn a blind eye to fishing, as long as it is not inconveniencing fellow beachgoers. Nudity is prohibited except at the north section of Haulover Beach.

I’m going to propose to my partner while I’m here – where should I do it?
Pedro:
I would take advantage of Miami’s beautiful scenery and propose at sunset on the beach when the moon is rising.
Noel: You could charter a yacht and drift along in Biscayne Bay as the sun sets and the moon shines over South Beach. For the actual proposal, you could arrange for a plane to fly over with a banner asking the question.
Maite: Miami has so many romantic proposal spots, including the luscious gardens and parks like Matheson Hammock Park, the Miami Beach Botanical Garden and historic venues like the Ancient Spanish Monastery, the Vizcaya Museum and Garden, which offer breathtaking backdrops.


For more on Miami, see
The Telegraph’s complete Miami destination guide

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VIBE MAGAZINE

Art Basel 2013: Music, Art Meld At First-Ever Sound/Vision MIAMI At Aqua

Charley Rogulewski Posted December 3, 2013
 Sound/Vision MIAMI at Aqua

VIBE is headed down to Miami for Art Basel 2013. South Beach becomes a paradise for art lovers, with galleries from around the world commandeering the 305 from Dec. 4-8. One stop we’ll be making is the annual Aqua Art Miami, now in its ninth year.

Aqua Art Miami takes over the tony art deco South Beach hotel of the same name on Collins Ave. where each room transforms into an art gallery for the city’s art week. This year, they up the ante with the first-ever Sound/Vision MIAMI parties at Aqua Art Miami. Sound/Vision MIAMI will be bringing in DJs curated by Lyons Wier Music and Audiophile Plus to “illustrate the synergy between visual art and music.” Playing along with Aqua Art Miami’s mission to promote emerging contemporary artists, Sound/Vision MIAMI is bringing together artists, producers and DJs in the art fair format with sets that will complement the art on display.

DJ sets will take place in the penthouse suite and filter through all the rooms and hotel’s courtyard. Local music acts include Jessica Who, Rage Johnson, MeLo X, She’s LB and Thomas Piper. Visual artists include Tobias Batz, Kevin Bourgeois, Beau Dunn, Greg Haberny, Stephanie Hirsch, David Lyle, Bobby Mathieson, Jeff Muhs, James Austin Murray, Edie Nadelhaft, Tim Okamura & Fahamu Pecou.

Stay tuned for coverage of Sound/Vision MIAMI @ Aqua on VIBE. A full schedule of Sound/Vision events at Aqua Art Miami can be seen here.

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THE 305.COM

ART BASEL: The Art Of Music Event With DJ Steph Floss, Meel & Unknwn @ The Shore Club

Tuesday December 3, 2013 | 11:22 am
Written By  
Posted in

unnamed-3

“The Art of Music” event Friday, December 6, 2013 from 1:00p to 5:00p Poolside at the Shore Club located at 1901 Collins Ave, Miami, FL. “The Art of Music” will provide an atmosphere where the industry of art, music, and performance collide.

The afternoon festivities will consist of 4 DJ’s: Meel, Iron Lyon, DJ Steph Floss, and Arkitekt; 5 performances: Fly Union, Chase N Cashe, Ducky Smallz, Dee Goodz, King Chip, and Tezo. During the cross music selection of Hip Hop, EDM, and performance; 3 street artists will be creating pieces of art. Free Admission.

Shore Club South Beach Hotel
1901 Collins Ave
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone: (305) 695-3100

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

Art Basel Miami Beach: What to Do, Eat and Drink

9:00 AM PST 11/26/2013 by Mark Ellwood
Cavalli Restaurant Art Basel Miami - H 2013
Cavalli Restaurant
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ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

Charlotte Perriand’s Beach House Comes to Life at Design Miami

December 3, 2013
Charlotte Perriand’s beach cottage

Charlotte Perriand’s “maison au bord de l’eau” was designed in 1934, but never built until now.

In 1934, the year after her 30th birthday, Charlotte Perriand won second prize in a contest, run by French magazine L’Architecture d’Aujourd’hui, to design an affordable vacation home. Her sketches for a “maison au bord de l’eau,” or beachside cottage, show a simple, square structure built of wood panels and glass doors, the rooms arranged around an open-air terrace with ocean views.

Charlotte Perriand’s beach cottage

The home’s focal point is a central wooden sundeck.

Its breezy elegance and graceful utility are characteristic of the work of the young Parisian architect, who by then had already been a member of Le Corbusier’s studio for several years. Despite the charm and cleverness of its design, the house was never built—until now.

Charlotte Perriand's beach cottage

The wood-clad interior features simple furnishings and the designer’s recognizable light fixtures.

Nearly 80 years later, Louis Vuitton, whose spring-summer 2014 women’s collections are inspired by Perriand’s legacy, has brought her maison to life. The house makes its debut this week at Miami’s Raleigh Hotel as part of the Design Miami festivities, during which it will be for sale through Sotheby’s.

Charlotte Perriand's beach cottage

A minimal bedroom space displays clothing by Louis Vuitton.

“La maison au bord de l’eau” will be on display December 3–8.

Art Basel Roundup: Volume I

Hebru Brantley;Warhol and Basquiat
by Hebru Brantley

We know you’re thinking about turkey, but Art Basel is already upon us. The 12th edition of the fair, and all the great satellites that have popped up around it has gone and backed right up to Thanksgiving this year. So don’t eat too much, you’ll be needing to squeeze into those party frocks sooner than you can say “pumpkin pie!”
Perhaps the biggest buzz of the week is the long-awaited Pérez Art Museum Miami opening. After endless fund-raising, excitement and hard-hat tours, VIPs are finally invited to a preview of exhibits on Tuesday, Dec. 3, before the museum opens to the Basel-going public the following day.

ai-weiwei-installation-11-
Ai Wei Wei Installation

Viewers will be checking out Ai Weiwei: According to What? Chinese artists and visionary Ai Weiwei’s exhibition will feature work of the last 20 years, including photography and the large-scale sculptures for which the artist is best known. Expect beautiful and provocative works of art that will evoke social, political and cultural positions on Ai’s native country China, as well as the world at large.

If you can score an invite to the private dinner in Mr. Perez’s honor on Wednesday night, cudos.  Everyone else will be honoring namesake donors honor Darlene and Jorge M. Pérez on Saturday night at the sold-out Pérez Art Museum Miami Gala. More than 700 of the art world’s VIPs are expected to attend the party which includes a reception in the gallery spaces followed by a seated dinner and dancing in the park followed by a private Marc Anthony performance.

Maserati North America is hosting the VIP Toast at PAMM and Maserati VIP Lounge experience for PAMM members and Art Basel VIPs. The museum’s opening party will be on Thursday, Dec. 5. The evening will debut a new project by Los Jaichackers, Night Shade/Solanaceae, a performance of music, video and sculpture. The event will also present The Ghibli, the revolutionary new $64,000 Maserati.

Keith Haring Untitled (car), 1986
Keith Haring Untitled (car) 1986 Buick Special

Speaking of cars, Ferrari is going to be a patron this year partnering with Adam Lindemann’s Venus Over Manhattan gallery, to create Piston Head: Artists Engage the Automobile at the 1111 Lincoln, which starts Tuesday. Look for “automotive sculptures” by Damien Hirst, Keith Haring and more. The exhibition will kick off with a super exclusive private viewing on Tuesday and will be open to the public on Wednesday.

On the fashion tip, BCBGMAXAZRIA Chief Creative Officer, Lubov Azria will be in town to host a runway show and discussion.  Flavio Briatore and Antonio Percassi of Billionaire Italian Couture are opening their east coast flagship store December 3 in the Buena Vista Post office. We’ll see if they make the deadline – the building is still in the midst of construction that is taking it from restaurant to store. And BAZAAR is hosting a pop-up shop at Soho House’s library open daily from 11am-6pm during the fair. They are promising items to bring curated items off the pages of the magazine into your hands, not unlike ELLE Spa.

Art Miami
Art Miami

Art Miami is celebrating it’s 24th edition (it started long before Basel or the other young satellites) and is an Art-Week must-hit. The fair, which is the leading contemporary fair, will commence on Dec. 3 with a blow-out VIP preview, and will be open to the public the following day. Get tickets here.

Michy’s Miami Beach pop up in the Miami Beach Botanical Gardens will seat an intimate 100 guests per night with a four-course menu at $135 per person. Guests can make reservations and pre-purchase tickets at michysmiami.com.

Haute Living Honors Swizz Beatz
Swizz Beatz with wife Alicia Keys

Of course, most of these events are invitation-only, but there are some parties that present another level of difficulty to score invites. Most of these you won’t read about til after they occur, but we’ll give you a taste. Architect Richard Meier is designing the Galerie Gmurzynska at Basel, and to celebrate, he’s holding a private dinner at newly opened restaurant Sea Salt, an upscale fish restaurant on the Miami River.

Jeff Koons will have a dinner at Braman Motors, there is the famous Aby Rosen dinner at the W on Thursday and Haute Living will host a plethora of private parties that include a dinner for IWC with very important guests like Karolina Kurkova and Micky Arison on Tuesday. They’ll be with Hublot on Star Island on Friday serving up Dom Perignon and a Hebru Brantly installation curated by Swizz Beatz.

Meanwhile, Haute Living’s watch-centric offshoot Haute Time will host another Dom-soaked party with Roger Dubuis and cover hunk Gerard Butler at the W South Beach with Russell Simmons, Serena Williams and a handful of top-secret VIPs.

Save some energy for the after hours. This is Miami, after all, and unlike Cinderella’s pimped out wheels and duds, Art Week doesn’t end at midnight.

Cy Wait’s Adoré nightclub is opening it’s doors on Thursday night for their grand opening  – and strictly VIP list celebration. Get the whole lowdown on Cy (aka Paris Hilton’s ex) and Adoré here.  Everyone is waiting with bated breath for this nightlife heavyweight to change the club game for the better.

Amy Sacco’s New York celebrity hotspot, No. 8, will take over Rec Room for a quintessential Basel party. Big names and familiar faces will be a given here. Mansion is pulling out all the stops for Basel with two big names in the biz. Mega DJ, label boss and super producer Mark Ronson is taking over on Friday night and world-renowned artist Boy George will hit the turntables on Saturday.

amfAR Milano 2012 After Party Presented By Fendi'O - Inside
Mark Ronson

Too much to handle? We know, but we’re far from finished. Next time, we’ll cover pop ups, satellite fairs and much, much more in Volume II. In the meantime, take a look at what Haute Art Ambassador Sarah Arison has to say about her Basel strategy here.

Art Basel Roundup: Volume II

Lady-Gaga
Omar’s Brave Society Dinner will benefit Lady Gaga’s Born this Way Foundation and maybe, feature an appearance from the diva herself

Basel starts….now! Yes, two days earlier than in years past, but this is a behemoth no one can stop. Although this is just a fraction of what’s going on this week, it’s the good part.

CASSINA-Nuage-Bibliothèque-Murale-Charlotte-Perriand
A Charlotte Perriand design for Cassina

Design Miami opens on Wednesday with an entrance designed by formlessfinder, which, for us, is reason enough to check it out. 1960s modernist Charlotte Perriand is a big name at Basel this year, with multiple exhibitions on view, including a solo exhibition called Charlotte Perriand—A House in Montmarte. Additionally, there will be showcases of her work in three different locations, the Cassina Showroom, the Louis Vuitton boutique – which has had the facade redone in her honor – and at the Raleigh – where a Design Miami satellite exhibition will take place making a Perriand-themed ‘house’ with Louis Vuitton.

FENDI Casa is presenting Facets of Art in the Design District on Thursday. They will debut the new Bentley Collection while displaying the works of artist Maria Pergay. As this is sponsored by Bentley, as in our favorite luxury car, it is certain to be tres luxe.

0a9d880e-8a4d-45fe-83d6-d9ce3eeff56b_7 Fendi Casa NY showroom - 4
FENDI Casa

Modern Life Concept House is Elle Decor’s sprawling, 10,300 square-foot private waterfront estate designed by renowned designers, such as Daniele Busca, Fernando Wong, Sam Robin, Wade Hallock and more. The Miami Beach home will be open to tour this week and we’re sure it will be amazing.

Art Britannia is an exhibition that proudly celebrates craft, technical skill, mark making and gestures that reflect British art. The official opening is on Dec. 5, hosted by the British-American Business Council. It is curated by Ben Austin and produced by designer and artist Karelle Levy. Come by for a spot of tea and taste of Anglophila.

art brittania
Art Brittania

Maison Martin Margiela and Atelier Swarovski are celebrating the debut of Stalker, an exclusive installation by French artist Baptiste Debombourg, and presenting their new collection, Crystalactite, with a private cocktail reception at their Design District location.

A month-long pop-up devoted to delectable drinks made with only the best ingredients, as well as small, savory plates like Carbonara Croquetas and rock shrimp Ceviche, seems too good to be true, especially since it will be at Miami Beach’s iconic Hotel Astor, which is being restored to its original Art Deco splendor. Drinking Room, created by renowned chef, Giorgio Rapicavoli, launches on Tuesday, Dec. 3, and will run through New Year’s Eve.

David Datuna’s Viewpoint of Billions art collaboration with Google Glass will have its public debut at New World Symphony on Dec. 3. The exhibition will feature an interactive experience with Google’s latest technology.

Marina Abramovic
Matthu Placek’s Marina Abramovic

Matthu Placek’s A Portrait of Marina Abramovic is the first of Placek’s body of “moving portraits,” which captures the subject’s life story without dialogue. There will be screenings every 15 minutes from 6 pm until 3 am Wednesday- Saturday at the Jewel Box on the YoungArts campus (2100 Biscayne Blvd).

Ocean House invites guests to view “The Girl at Jellyfish Lake,” a surrealistic underwater encounter of a girl and 5 million jellyfish, featuring photography by Amber Arbucci. The merriment will be accompanied by grand piano melodies and a chance to talk with Arbucci herself. Opens Dec. 5.

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Girl at Jellyfish Lake

Carlos Betancourt’s latest commission, Appropriations From El Rio: As Time Goes By, is a large-scale complex installation consisting of hundreds of three-dimensional elements. The artwork is produced with the collaboration and assistance of architect Alberto Latorre. The work has been commissioned by the new restaurant on the Miami River, Seasalt and Pepper Brasserie. The unveiling will coincide with the opening of the restaurant on Dec. 5, which will be an invite-only reception. It will be open to the public the following day.

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Calos Betancourt

If you want to take a break from all that art there are parties galore, as we mentioned in the Art Basel Roundup I. Audemars Piguet is having a blow-out with Pharrell, and Omar’s Brave Society dinner that is for Lady Gaga’s Born This Way Foundation, which will be sponsored by Paddle 8 and Haute Living.

Then of course there’s the party-slash-installation that you can’t get into no matter how hard you try. Read more about it here.

One of the best little fairs for emerging art during Miami Art Week, is Aqua, which is now part of Art Miami and opens on Dec. 3 for an exclusive VIP preview and on Dec. 4 to the public. The classic South Beach hotel is equipped with spacious exhibition rooms that open onto a breezy intimate courtyard. Aqua is sure to be a favorite gathering spot for relaxation and discussion of new contemporary art.

Light and Paper
Ritz Carlton

The Ritz-Carlton South Beach has emerged as a serious player in the art game this year. The Ritz is collaborating with Diana Lowenstein Arts gallery for a limited-edition installation suspended in the hotel’s lobby. Light and Paper, the name of German sculptor Angela Glajcar’s work, is on loan to the Ritz from Diana Lowenstein’s private collection and takes a center-stage spot for all to see.

Real Housewife of Miami and Haute 100-lister Lea Black will be at the Ritz-Carlton on Thursday from 6-8 pm to celebrate the success of her After Five crystal handbag line. The hotel’s lobby bar will feature “Lea-tinis” made with Zry Vodka and couture cookies. Handbags from Lea’s line will be on display and available for purchase.

Bonus: the hotel is offering a valuable resource exclusively to its guests. Art Basel Ambassador Noel Lanzas is the go-to Basel expert to help guests plan and navigate through parties, events and exhibits so that they can enjoy the best of Basel without the headaches of planning and organizing their own schedules.

Art consumers will be going wild over this year’s crop of satellite fairs. While they’re all amazing, hitting them all might be too lofty of a goal. Here are our suggestions:

Take a break from the hustle and bustle of Basel with YogArt. Presented by Jugofresh, the exercise in Jivamukti yoga will take place beginning Thursday at Wynwood Walls in the heart of the Art District. Baselers will have the opportunity to “Take a Breather During Basel,” and participate in an enhanced yoga experience produced by Arlene Chaplin, Dawn B. Feinberg and Lee Brian Schrager.

Breakfasts and brunches are always a big thing. The Rubell Family Collection’s artistic breakfast is on Thursday from 9-12 pm with the theme “Faith.” The meal opens their new exhibition, “28 Chinese,” which was curated after six visits to China between 2001 and 2012 during which they checked out over 100 artists’ studios. Pulse will host a brunch on Thursday as well. And then, there is The Sagamore’s Annual Basel Brunch which is an important time for Basel elite to recap and recover. The brunch is hosted by hotel owners Marty and Cricket Taplin, alongside six local museums, on Saturday and is also great chance to check out the collector’s latest acquisitions and installations

And for those who wish Basel would never end…. LDV Hospitality continues the festivities with the Hendricks Shuffleboard Party at Gale rooftop on Monday, Dec. 9th, and the Falling Wishes dinner at Dolce on the 10th.

Good luck and happy Baseling!

From Elton John’s cocktail party to the big Ai Weiwei show, the must-attend events this December.

This story first appeared in the Dec. 6 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.

After 10 years of drawing the arterati to Miami Beach every December, Art Basel has its own traditions (beyond reliable sightings of Calvin Klein). Developer Aby Rosen always throws a dinner for an eclectic, elite bunch at the hottest new restaurant, while Artsy.com’s bash often wins the title of the week’s buzziest. This year, it will take over the Freehand Miami Hostel on Dec. 6 for an art-tech happy hour. (Make a mental note to check out the new food and drink place by Gabe Orta and Elad Zvi of Freehand’s pop-up cocktail joint Broken Shaker when it opens.) Concept boutique The Webster also will host its annual passel of private dinners for everyone from Eddie Borgo to, yes, Klein.

PHOTOS: The Best of Art Basel Miami Beach

Gatecrashers will want to snag entry to Elton John‘s AIDS Foundation cocktail party Dec. 2, hosted by Givenchy muse Marina Abramovic, and Perez Art Museum Miami‘s 700-person gala, with a Marc Anthony performance, on Dec. 7. After two years of construction and more than a decade of discussions, the landmark $220 million art space, renamed in honor of donor and local developer Jorge Perez, will debut with a show by Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei. Retail magnate Galen Weston and wife Hilary will host a rival event the same night at their gallery on Vero Beach, which will show Jasper Johns, a blockbuster worth the hours-long drive.

With Jeffrey Deitch‘s annual event gone since he shuttered his namesake gallery in New York (long before resigning from the MOCA board in July), MoMA’s PS1 shindig at the reinvigorated Delano on Dec. 6 may win party primacy this year.

STORY: Kanye West Previews ‘Yeezus’ at Art Basel Switzerland

As the fash pack flocks to Basel, expect ritzy store openings, from Swiss brand Philipp Plein to Longchamp to Maison Laduree, where a party Dec. 3 will celebrate its collaboration with artist Will Cotton, who developed a new macaron flavor (ginger-infused whipped cream), among other creations.

Miami’s “foodaissance” (per local blogger Jacquelynn D. Powers) doesn’t deny the city’s showgirl soul. Roberto Cavalli‘s lavish, leopard-printed namesake restaurant opens just in time for Art Basel, serving Tuscan cuisine plus Tenuta degli Dei wine from the designer’s own vineyard. After a decade of being rechristened the Design District, Buena Vista on the mainland is finally drawing foodie folk and will soon be home to Richard HalesBlackbrick, a 50-seater Chinese restaurant named after the bricks of tea once used as currency in China. It will offer house-made noodles and even smoked charcuterie made on site.

STORY: Inside the Art Basel Fair: Miami’s A-List Party

If all this sounds like sensory overload, producer David Hoberman advises: “The best way to survive Miami Basel is to take a run on the beach at the end of the day and jump in the ocean and let the water and art from the day wash over you.”

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NYPOST

As Art Basel arrives, South Florida begins its seasonal sizzle

By Michael Kaplan

November 25, 2013 | 9:28pm

Miami’s high season approaches next week, with flights from New York quickly filling up and beach conditions now turning optimal.

Slick gatherings such as Design Miami and Art Basel will soon make their annual arrivals. And local legends are primed to present their latest cultural and culinary wizardry, such as chef Michelle Bernstein, who will unveil a pair of dining concepts — Michy’s Miami Beach Pop Up and the Garden Café — inside the Miami Beach Botanical Gardens from Dec. 3 to 7.

This year also marks the opening of three new South Beach hotels on Collins Avenue. Funky-but-chic and freshly ribbon-cut last week, Redbury Hotel South Beach (from $419), from Sam Narazian’s SBE (which also owns SLS Hotel South Beach), outfits its 69 rooms and suites with turntables and features a new Italian restaurant, Lorenzo, helmed by Spiaggia veteran Tony Mantuano.

The 74-room Metropolitan by COMO, Miami Beach, opens in February; its spa and beachfront pool are reserved just for hotel guests and bring a big dose of wellness to the usual South Beach hotel party scene (from $499). Meanwhile, Shelborne South Beach will reopen its storied doors in early 2014, fresh off a $150 million reno. Sporting 200 rooms, the hotel will also boast the buzzy restaurant Morimoto South Beach and an interior design scheme courtesy of fashion-minded Richard Mishaan and Meg Sharpe of NYC’s The Lion and The Crown (from $389).

The guests-only beachside pool at the Metropolitan by COMO.

Food-wise, the city’s big-name chef flood is showing no signs of letting up. Stephen Starr is launching a local-leaning bistro, Verde, inside the city’s new Perez Art Museum Miami; the resto and museum both debut on Dec. 4. Seafood lovers will swoon at the Collins Avenue outpost of Lure Fishbar, operating out of Loews Miami Beach Hotel and scheduled to be ready for Basel. In the lobby of Fontainebleau Miami Beach, Michael Mina 74 is poised to launch in early December as a restaurant/bar/ultra-lounge with a hyped-up comfort-food menu: potpies, truffle omelets, grilled snapper and the like.

On a far more down-to-earth level, the guys behind hip Miami hostel Freehand will soon debut an organic, shared-plate restaurant inside the historic 1930s house on property. Hangover cures can be found via the fried chicken and waffles breakfast at Tongue In Cheek in the SoFi district. Then there’s the Cypress Room, with its mounted deer heads amid mid-century design — a Design District hot table with a spot-on “new-American” menu.

Colorful plates at the Cypress Room.Photo: The Genuine Hospitality Group

On the nightlife front: Radio Bar, with an actual radio tower built into the place, has gone from pop-up to permanent, and Albert Trummer, a co-founder of NYC Chinatown lounge Apotheke, brings his incendiary cocktail show to the at the Rubell Hotel with Drogerie. Do Not Sit On The Furniture is a frills-free dance club from DJs Behrouz and Will Renuart, whose Electric Pickle is considered a Mecca for EDM lovers (423 16th St., 305-450-3809). The faux down-low theme continues at Patpong Road, a sleazy-by-design bar situated atop the very good Thai restaurant Khong River House, just off Lincoln Road Mall, and set up to resemble an idealized version of a back-alley Bangkok dive.

Or if you want to dabble in the nightlife sciences, try the vitamin/mineral infusions at Club Essentia spa on the Delano’s top floor. There, Dr. Ivan Rusilko’s custom-mixed feel-good IV drips will get you revved for your next run on the town.

The Club Essentia Spa (go for the mineral infusions) crowns the Delano.

Energized or not, Miami’s serious shoppers make their way to the Design District. Fab men’s shoes and bags dominate the recently opened Berluti, where you can play a game of pool while waiting for your shoes to be hand-patinaed. Flashier kicks can be found in Christian Louboutin Boutique Homme, with colors ranging from cherry red to camouflage.

Nearby, in Wynwood, check out of the city’s best private museums, such as Rubell Family Collection and de la Cruz Collection, along with a cool galleries. Must-sees include Frederic Snitzer Gallery, David Castillo, Gallery Diet and the newly opened Mindy Solomon, specializing in emerging artists.

The area also has must-eats and drinks: The Wynwood Brewing Company, where you can sit at the bar and watch the craft brewers in action; Gramps, a performance space cum locals bar that is well suited for grooving to live rock bands or chilling on the patio between games of bocce; and the Japanese/Peruvian dining spot SuViche, which wows with a Pisco bar stocked with a dozen different infusions of the South American spirit.

10 EVENTS BEYOND BASEL

1. Fusion MIA Fair, Dec. 3-7: Grey Goose fuels  this year’s art-, celeb-, film- and fashion-focused meet-n-greet.
2. Art Miami, Dec. 3-8: Over 125 global galleries headline Miami’s longest running art fair, now in its 24th year.
3Interactive Art Fair, Dec. 3-8: Art, tech and education engage in a cultural ménage à trois over this digital media fest.
4. “A Portrait of Marina Abramovic,” Dec. 4-7: Catch the world premiere of artist Matthu Placek’s short film installation in the Jewel Box on the YoungArts campus.
5. ART ASIA Miami, Dec. 4-8: Works from Near Eastern, Middle Eastern and South East Asian artists, this event draws tens of thousands.
6. Brazil Art Fair, Dec. 4-8:This fair features 40 galleries from South America’s artistic HQ.
7. INK Miami Art Fair, Dec. 4-8: All prints, all the time at this “works on paper” art festival.
8. NADA Art Fair, Dec. 5-8: The New Art Dealers Alliance is behind the only major art fair run by a non-profit.
9. PULSE Miami, Dec. 5-8: Focusing only on contemporary art, PULSE makes its ninth go-round.
10. YogArt, Dec. 5-8: Graffiti art park Wynwood Walls once again hosts this relaxing alternative to Basel’s mania.

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Maman Gallery To Open First US Location In Miami Design District November 2013

Esteemed South American art dealer and gallerist Daniel Maman to open first US gallery in heart of Miami’s Design District

MIAMI, Oct. 28, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Daniel Maman, renowned Argentine art dealer and prominent figure in the Argentinian culture, is slated to open Maman Gallery, his first US gallery bearing his name and located in the heart of Miami’s Design District in November 2013. Maman Gallery’s grand opening will launch with an exclusive collection of historic and contemporary artwork collected by Daniel Maman himself, along with his wife, Patricia Pacino de Maman, over their years spent traveling the globe while sourcing rich new art.

Since the start of his career, Maman has invested in art; and as a result, his personal collection comprises of 2,000 works of art, all of which are owned by Maman himself. The largest modern and contemporary art gallery in Buenos Aires bears Maman’s name, as he’s managed and curated important collection pieces by a plethora of notable South American artists over his 37 year career. The gallery’s Buenos Aires location opened in October 2001, where it quickly became recognized among the art community for promoting both established and emerging contemporary artists. Over the years, the quality of Maman’s gallery exhibits have earned him acclaim from critics, as well as world wide recognition.

Maman recently moved to Florida with his experience and knowledge not only to show interesting art, but to also drive a cultural movement. Similar to the Buenos Aires location, Maman Gallery will offer art seminars, by both curators and collectors, and will also offer interdisciplinary events related to both design and fashion. Focused in both Modern and Contemporary art, the new space will exhibit  historic Latin American artworks: Arte Concreto,  Geometric Art, and Kinetik Art. Maman will also showcase the work of contemporary Argentinan artists who are part of the international market, and who are part of the most  important museum collections in the world: Leon Ferrari (MOMA, Houston Museum); Guillermo Kuitca (Moma, Tate Gallery), Alberto Greco (Reina Sofia), Liliana Porter (Whitney, Tate Modern), Nicola Constantino (Daros Foundation) and Fernando Canovas (Ivam).

In addition to handling Abstract artists, the gallery also shows the works of Figurative and Neo Figurative painters, such as Colombian artist Fernando Botero, artworks of the Argentinian group Mondongo, and artist Daniel Scheimberg, who will have a solo show and whose catalogue’s prologue will be written by American artist Peter Halley.

Maman Gallery is located at 3930 NE 2nd Avenue, Suite 204, Miami, Florida 33137. For more information, please visit their website at http://www.danielmaman.com.

ABOUT MAMAN GALLERY

Maman Fine Art, headed by gallerist and archivist Daniel Maman and Patricia Maman, has locations in both Miami and Buenos Aires, and represents over twenty artists concentrated in traditional forms of sculpture and painting. The principal objective of Daniel Maman Fine Art is the international promotion of young artists as well as those already established in Argentine art. The physical architectural design of the gallery creates a neutral environment that does not compete with the works on show, allowing for a wide range of artistic manifestations creating distinct spatial experiences while maintaining the character of a great singular space. For more information, please visit http://www.danielmaman.com.

Media Contact:

TARA, Ink.

Nick D’Annunzio/Samantha Ryan

nick@taraink.com/samantha@taraink.com

305.864.3434 ext. 165

SOURCE Maman Gallery

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HAUTE LIVING

This Is The Art Basel Party You Can’t Get In To. Literally.

November 25, 2013 | Read 6 times

Written by Erin Newberg

| Published in

ART PUBLIC

Brandi Reddick, the Director of the Public Arts program for the City of Miami Beach told me about the most exclusive party going on during Art Basel this year. After all, if anyone would know, it is Brandi. But how come I was not invited? Did you get the invite? Where is this uber-vip extravaganza going on?

No one was invited. No access at all for that matter. And the party is going on at the Port of Miami Beach in two containers, red carpet, drapery like the Delano and search lights. I should not forget the many Cadillac Escalades that will be lined up outside.

Do you still not understand? Well, this public arts program was created by Jim Drain and Bhakti Baxter, two of Miami’s most notable artists who are making a mockery of this whole ‘uber, ultra, beyond VIP party’ trend behind basel, and now it is coming to life on December 3-7 from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. When I asked Brandi her thoughts on this project, she pauses, then tells me “it is a rif on the fact that everything is VIP and you can’t get in.” Ha, I guess the joke is on us.

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NYPOST

Page Six:

Gearing up for Art Basel Miami Beach

By Page Six Team

November 25, 2013 | 3:03am

Art Basel Miami Beach is gearing up for Dec. 5 through 8. More than 250 galleries will be showing from 31 countries at the fair, while big parties are being thrown by gallerist and collector Adam Lindemann, real estate tycoon Aby Rosen and art dealer Larry Gagosian. Lindemann’s Venus Over Manhattan gallery is throwing a VIP preview for Ferrari’s Piston Head exhibition on Dec 3. Artists including Damian Hirst and Joshua Callahan will feature automotive sculpture. On Dec. 4, Roger Dubuis, in partnership with Dom Perignon, will host a private dinner hosted by Gerard Butler. The evening showcases the Roger Dubuis Excalibur Quatuor, alongside the Jeff K
oons-designed Dom Perignon bottles. Alex Dellal, Stavros Niarchos and Vito Schnabel are throwing a late-night fête celebrating Limited Edition by Jeff Koons on Dec. 5, at Wall with music by DJ Ruckus and DJ Zoe Kravitz. Also Dec. 5, Architectural Digest, Amy Sacco and Miami Cocktail Company are hosting the No. 8 pop up at the James Hotel. And Artsy is also throwing a dinner that night celebrating the new John Baldessari Studios at the CalArts School of Art.

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PRIZM ART FAIR CELEBRATES ITS LAUNCH IN 2013

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
PRIZM ART FAIR CELEBRATES ITS LAUNCH IN 2013

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December 2013

Entertaining special

With a limited edition subscriber cover by Christian Astuguevieille

‘Wallpaper* Handmade with Jaguar’ to travel to Design Miami

design / 19 Nov 2013 /By Nick Compton

The greatest hits from our annual Handmade exhibition took over 12 windows of London store Harrods in October – and now the show is hitting the road ahead of its American debut at Design Miami in December

1 / 17

The first outing of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of show – a spectacular presentation across 12 windows of Harrods department store in London – brought Brompton Road to a standstill. Now the show is leaving Europe for the first time and is set to wow visitors at Design Miami.

The display – which includes around 70 works from the four year run of Handmade exhibitions in Milan as well as five brand new pieces produced in collaboration with Jaguar – will be on view in the Miami Design District from 4-8 December.

For those of you who don’t know, Wallpaper* Handmade is our groundbreaking celebration of contemporary design and craft, cutting edge materials and production techniques. Showcasing collaborations with the world’s best designers, artists, makers and manufacturers, it has become a must-see during Salone del Mobile. The show in Miami includes one-off pieces from Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder and more.

The Jaguar project includes five new collaborations between the legendary motoring marque and designers Fredrikson Stallard, Moritz Waldemeyer, Mathieu Gustafsson, the architects Neri & Hu and marble specialist Salvatori. Jaguar will also be displaying two new models, the F-type and F-type Coupe, as well as the C-X17 concept vehicle, outside and in the exhibition venue.

Opening hours:
Wednesday 4 December: 12:00pm – 5:00pm
Thursday 5 December: 12:00pm – 5:00pm
Friday 6 December: 9:00am – 7:00pm
Saturday 7 December: 10:00am – 7:00pm
Sunday 8 December: 12:00pm – 6:00pm

Information
‘Wallpaper* Handmade with Jaguar’ runs from 4 – 8 December 2013
Address
Wallpaper* Handmade Gallery
3841 NE 2nd Avenue,
1st Floor, Unit 103
(Entrance on NE 39th Street)
Miami Design District

Read more at http://www.wallpaper.com/design/wallpaper-handmade-with-jaguar-to-travel-to-design-miami/6968#mp1phyBHq52xAFZ3.99

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Heineken Mural Project brings beer, bikes and (of course) huge murals to Wynwood for Art Basel

Heineken Mural Project brings beer, bikes and (of course) huge murals to Wynwood for Art Basel

heineken.jpg
Art by Trek6

By Amy ReyesSix renowned street artists including Chor Boogie, Estria, Prime, Trek6, CP1 and Don Rimx painted the town – Wynwood specifically – as part of the Heineken Mural Project. Each artist was given the mission to interpret Heineken’s “Open Your World” message and the murals can be viewed with ease by renting a Deco Bike, the bike sharing program that launched on Miami Beach and Surfside, which will have a station located outside of Wood Tavern (2531 NW 2nd Ave.), home of the Heineken Beer Garden during the Art Basel festivities.

Zip around the streets of Wynwood on the Deco Bike and, at each mural use the QR codes located on the Heineken Mural Project map and on each work of art to get info on the mural, the artist and special events. Deco Bike will also have a station by Art Miami in MIdtown, making it the next destination after the Heineken Mural circuit.

Stayed connected to Twitter to find out when and where the Heineken Mural Project will be hosting unexpected pop-up parties by following #heinekenmurals. Also view work by Heineken artists at The Workshop Collective (171 NW 23 St.) from Dec. 6-9 from 2-7 p.m. daily.

MIAMI NEW TIMES

DB Bistro Moderne’s Beluga Vodka Terrace Art Basel Pop-Up: Free Cocktail if You Know How

By Laine Doss Thu., Nov. 21 2013 at 9:00 AM
dbbistro_lounge_billwisser.jpg
Bill Wisser
DB Bistro Moderne is hosting an Art Basel pop-up lounge.

From November 30 through December 9, db Bistro Moderne’s terrace will be transformed into a chic afternoon bistro (complete with fluffy pillows for lounging) when it hosts the Beluga Noble

Russian Vodka Terrace.The special Art Basel pop-up will offer cocktails crafted with Beluga vodka, made with Siberian Artesian well water. From 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily, enjoy the Bardot ($14), made with Beluga vodka, yellow chartreuse, cucumber juice, honey, and fresh lemon.Don’t want to pay for your drink? Here’s how to get one on the house.Visit the Christie’s Auction House exhibition, “Art Deco Highlights,” located on the fifth floor of the JW Marriott Marquis Miami (home of db Bistro Moderne), show your ticket, and your Bardot cocktail is free. The exhibition, presented in correlation with Miami Art Week, is also free and open to the public December 3 through 5.

Art Basel Miami Beach 2013: Guide to exclusive parties

 If you don’t have an invite, don’t think about crashing these artsy soirees
Basel Celeb Events
Cindy Crawford, left, and Stephanie Seymour

By Lesley Abravanel | lank@aol.com

It’s that time of year again, time when everyone who’s no one attempts to make the rounds, rubbing elbows with high rollers, art dealers, artists and artful codgers swarming in the “scenenful” swelter of the behemoth that has become Art Basel Miami Beach. Despite the misnomer, the entire city will be full of these types and events – we’re just waiting for the invitation to 7-11’s convenience store confab. Of course, the ticket everyone seems to want is to whatever farce Lady Gaga has planned. Stay tuned, stand by and stand down, ‘cos here we go (for now… this list will be constantly updated as event information is released):

Tuesday, December 3

Alina & Anthony Kennedy Shriver & Stephanie Seymour Brant & Peter Brant host the Best Buddies Art + Friendship Auction hosted by Sara & Ugo Colombo at their Miami Beach estate. Event will feature live auction of contemporary works. (By Invitation Only, aka BIO)

Reception for famed fashion photographer Marco Glaviano and supermodel Cindy Crawford at Art Miami’s Cindy Crawford Lounge. Yup, you read right. To prove it, the lounge will launch a brand new collection of diamond dusted canvases of iconic black + white photos of Crawford from the 80s and 90s. Nearby also within Art Miami’s VIP preview is an appearance by the elusively ubiquitous Banksy – vis a vis “Heart With Bandages,” a controversial mural he created during his now fabled NYC spree showcased by gallery owner Stephan Keszler.  (BIO, until both the Crawford Lounge & Banksy exhibit open to the public December 4-8)

Drinking Room pop-up at the Hotel Astor. Launched by Eating House’s Giorgio Rapicavoli, this boozy Baselite could be command central for the chic elite. And if not, it’s ok, because the locals will be here regardless. For more information on drinks and edible art installations with Singapore’s Janice Wong, click here.

Speaking of rooms for drinking, open to the Baseling and non-Baseling public as of the expected opening date of November 25, is Cipriani Downtown Miami’s new lower level Cipriani Bar. We confirmed with a rep and, thus far, the Cipriani Bar is a Basel-free zone (BFZ) when it comes to events.

Wednesday, December 4

W Magazine’s editor in chief Stefano Tonchi & French label Vionnet’s creative director Goga Ashkenazi host a Pérez Art Museum Miami opening premiere of Suspension of Disbelief, a short film by Tim Walker starring Kristen McMenamy & Ben Whishaw. (BIO)

Miami-based footwear and accessory brand Del Toro and Italia Independent’s Founder (and Fiat heir) Lapo Elkann will host an exclusive cocktail event from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. to inaugurate the new Miami Beach pop-up shop and celebrate the launch of the Del Toro X Italia Independent collaboration line at 2000 Collins Ave. (Cocktail party BIO, pop up, open through March, is open to the public daily (and nightly) during Basel from 10 a.m. until 11 p.m.

Thursday, December 5

The aforementioned Del Toro will host a block party at its headquarters in The Wynwood Building (2750 NW 3rd Ave, Suite 22, Miami) featuring custom 1/1 original hand-painted shoes in a variety of Del Toro silhouettes by approximately 50 artists from around the world. Full mural walls by six famed artists – including Stash, Evoca1, Michael Vasquez, Johnny Robles and Magnus – will be unveiled to commemorate the debut of Del Toro’s Art Basel collection. To top it off, barbecue bites will be prepared by Henry Hane, former chef of Eating House, as well as a live musical performance by an undisclosed special guest. (Undisclosed guests are the best kind.) Even better, this one’s open to the public.

Maison Martin Margiela and Atelier Swarovski will host a private cocktail reception from 7 – 9 p.m. at Maison Martin Margiela (3930 NE 2nd Ave., Suite 101, Miami) to present their new collection ‘Crystalactite’ and celebrate the debut of ‘Stalker’, an exclusive installation by French artist Baptiste Debombourg. (BIO, stalkers need not apply)

Friday, December 6

Art + Music + Beach at The Official VH1 + SCOPE Party featuring a live performance by Tegan and Sara at Ocean Drive and 9th St. (BIO – sort of. Says a publicist, “the public will have a chance to be a part of it all by situating themselves just outside the space for what is bound to be another unforgettable musical and artistic experience.”)

Saturday, December 7

The Sagamore’s annual Art Basel Brunch is a hot meal – and a hot ticket – especially for the stalkerazzi. Though a few Miami freeloaders frequently find their way into this one, for the most part, the brunch is pretty exclusive. (BIO)

Party Patrol: Art Basel Music Edition

Big name DJs and local bands converge on Miami for the Art Basel festivities.

Bob-Sinclar.jpg

By Ms. Vique | viqueam@gmail.com

Music, art and more – Art Basel has arrived!  It’s a non-stop week of performances fused with amazing art installations and some of the world’s most notable socialites, celebrities, musicians and artists. Basel has invaded Miami all the clubs, bars, and lounges are battling it out with stellar entertainment to keep you busy all week long. Here’s my Party Patrol: Art Basel Edition.

Dec. 4

Perrier invites you to Midnight in Miami
1120 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; www.lordssouthbeach.com
Perrier Presents: The Black Lords at Lords South Beach, a larger than life public art installation by Desi Santiago to run daily from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.  In honor of the event, there will be  two private parties celebrating the opening of The Black Lords installment.  On Tuesday evening there will be a VIP Penthouse party with music DJ Juan E and hosted by Lady Fag, Erin Newberg, Tony Ferro  and Lauren Foster.  There will be complimentary vodka and Perrier cocktails until 10 p.m.  For more information email RSVP@Lordssouthbeach.com

Basel Vandals presents Afrobeta
327 NE 59th Terr., Miami Beach; www.fussestudios.com
Start Basel week with an Extravaganza at Fusse Studios with a performance by the electro-pop duo Aftobeta along with a performance by local band Astrokats and DJ VybeMode.  The three-day event will feature plenty of live art, live music, and plenty of drinks to keep you dancing through the week. Admission is free and starts at 1 p.m. each day

Bardot and Moca Shakers present Young Guru vs. Just Blaze
3456 N. Miami Ave., Miami; www.bardotmiami.com
Enjoy a special performance as Bardot and Moca Shakers presents Young Guru vs Just Blaze as part of the Art Basel week kick-off. These two creative producers will keep you rocking until the morning hours in a special installment of the World Famous Ricky Powell Slide Show.

Dec. 5

Pop-Up Piano at The Perry Hotel 
2377 Collins Ave., Miami Beach
Start off Basel with a special performance brought to you by the Steinway Piano Gallery with Pop-Up Piano Miami featuring famed rock and jazz pianist Elew and internationally-acclaimed singer Yuna from 8:30-11:30 p.m.  For tickets visit www.POPUPPIANOMIAMI2012.eventbrite.com.

The Hoxton’s License to Thrill Weekly Live Set welcomes Basel
1111 SW First Ave, Miami; www.hoxtonmiami.com
The newest addition to the Brickell nightlife scene, the Hoxton is getting in on Basel with a week long live music series that kicks off on Wednesday. The beach house-inspired venue will showcase artists throughout the week with live art performances along with live music each day.  Wednesday get down with the Juke starting at 9 p.m. Suenalo and DJ Johnny the Boy take over on Thursday; Locos Por Juana and DJ Andres Amadeus on Friday; and Mayday! and Dj Contra  on Saturday.

LIV presents Dita Von Teese
4441 Collins Ave, Miami Beach; www.livnightclub.com
LIV nightclub is kicking off Basel week with a special performance by the Queen of burlesque, the sexy Dita Von Teese as she presents her Opium Den Show.  It all kicks off at 11 p.m. with music by DJs Ruen and Jessica Who.

Basel festivities continue on Thursday with a special Basel edition of Cedric Gervais Sh!t Show, and a performance by international superstar Richie Hawtin on Friday celebrating music and technology.  Basel week at LIV finishes on Saturday with a performance brought to you by GUESS featuring international start DJ Tiesto along with special guest AllureTickets are available in advance.

PAX Miami presents Armada Fania
337 SW 8th Street, Miami; www.PAXmiami.com
The Armada Fania Club & Pop-Up Store is a four-night event at PAX Miami and will feature eight top DJs from Miami, Boston and NYC who will be playing the original and remix sounds the label that is often referred to as the “Motown of Latin music.” The week of events kicks off on Wednesday with Bobbito Garcia (aka Kool Bob Love) & The Brass King followed by Rice & Beans Sound System on Thursday, Whiskey Barons & Mr. Pauer on Friday, and Radio Rios & DJ Africa on Saturday. In addition to the music, the Armada Fania will feature the live art of Santiago, a New York based pin up/portrait artist. For it all starts at 8 p.m. each night.

Dec. 6

Peace on E(ART) at Fifty
485 Brickell Ave., Miami
Join artists Rubem Robierb, Alex Yanes, Alan Feldmesser, David Lavernia and many more as they come together at FIFTY Miami to help raise funds for children living in Central and South America with Planting Peace. Enjoy the live music by Elastic Bond and performance by Elemental Expressions Entertainment group.  It all starts at 8 p.m., for tickets go to www.wanttickets.com/peaceonearth.

FUSION: Art Basel 2012
55 NW 36th Street, Miami; www.lmntartsmiami.com
Talib Kweli, Sean Paul, Laurence Gartel, Bonnie Beats, Dj Epps, and many more will come together Thursday night for a one of a kind FUSION Art Basel event to benefit students in Broward and Miami-Dade county and keep art alive.  There will be an Art To Wear Fashion Show by Art of Shade, Lila Nikole, Lisu Vega, and The Art Institute.  It all starts at 8 p.m.  Tickets are available at www.saveimagination.org/tickets

Daytime, Downtime, Basel Hang at Wood Tavern
2531 NW Second Ave., Wynwood
The cool laidback bar gets in to the spirit of Basel with the Heineken + Friends’ kick-off of “Daytime, Downtime, Basel Hang” with sounds by king of disco and R&B re-edits Sleazy McQueen; Electric Pickle’s Will Renuart; girl about town Camp Gabby and Chang will be serving up some crunchy disco and funky beats from 1-8 p.m.  Immediately following at 9 p.m., locals art fair Miami’s Independent Thinkers will be hosting their VIP after party.  For more information contact Michelle at Michelle@supermarketcreative.com

The party continues at Wood Tavern Friday with the Artsy Fartsy party with New York Djs Lawrence Lee and Kieren Taylor.  On Sunday get ready for a Basel inspired Backyard Boogie starting at 1 p.m. with special guests Justin Miller (DFA), Dexter Love and Ess & Emm. 

MADE IN MIAMI heads to Room Service Lounge
929 Washington Ave., Miami Beach; www.roomservicemia.com
Miami’s own Oscar G is back and bringing his stellar MADE in MIAMI show to the newest lounge to hit South Beach.  Head over to Room Service lounge and enjoy house beats by one of one of the biggest DJs to come from our city.  Doors open at 11 p.m. Early arrival is suggested and you must RSVP by emailing milos@roomservicemia.com or calling 305-600-9414.

Dec. 7


SET and Haute Living present the official After Party for Domingo Zapata

320 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach; www.SETMiami.com

Set nightclub and Haute Living have teamed up to present the official after party of contemporary artist Domingo Zapata.  Dance all night to music by DJs N’dy and Ideal until 5 a.m.

“Future is Now” event at Gavanna
10 NE 40th Street., Miami www.gavannamiami.com
New York City invades Miami for a night of progressive sights and sounds with special guests DJs Proper Villains, G. Brown, Nikolas, Kimyon and more. Get ready to experience an interactive installation of multimedia expression, blurring the lines of art and music with technology.  It all starts at 10 p.m., you must be 21 and older to get in.  Enjoy complimentary cocktails courtesy of Voli Vodka.  For complimentary admisiion RSVP to ARTBASEL@dagproductions.com

Bamboo presents the EC Twins

550 Washington Ave., Miami; www.bamboomiamibeach.com
Bamboo is getting in on the action with performances by big names all week long long.  Kick off the weekend with special guests EC Twins as they take over the decks on Friday followed by Alex Guadino on Saturday night.  Tickets are available in advance at Wantickets.com.

Dec. 8

All aboard the French Express at the Vagabond
30 NE 14th St., Miami; www.thevagabondmiami.com
Come as you are and take it easy while you board the French Express featuring music by DJs Perseus, Jonas Rathsman, Moon Boots and Chris Malinchak along with residents A-Train, Wasabi and more for a special Basel edition of Back Door Bamby.  Doors open at 10 p.m. and admission is only $10.

Mansion presents ARTY
1235 Washington Ave., Miami; www.MansionMiami.com
Russian Trance and electro house DJ Arty is taking over the turntables at Mansion for a special edition of Others Play House, We Play Mansion. He’s rocking the decks with tracks like “Must Be Love,” “Underground” and many more.   It all starts at 11 p.m.

Seth Troxler at WALL
2201 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; www.wallmiami.com
Party it up at the exclusive WALL lounge with special guest Seth Troxler along with Davide Squillace and Damian Lazrus for an evening of intense house music and amazing art as part of the Basel Dancing Finale event. Table reservations are strongly suggested, dress code is strictly enforced and you must be 21 and older to get in.  Advance tickets available.

Locos Por Juana at The Stage Miami

170 NE 38th Street, Miami; www.thestagemiami.com
Wynwood’s premier live music venue the stage will host a week-long list of events in honor of Basel with performances from amazing artists.  Saturday night check out the Rigid II Graffiti in Miami unveiling of their mural painting on the exterior wall of the Stage Miami with a special performance by Locos Por Juana. Guests will enjoy Mojito cocktails compliments of The Stage and all the local cigar aficionados, a cigar roller will be onsite.  It all kicks off at 10 p.m.

Also at the Stage this week, hip-hop legend Rakim to perform alongside ArtOfficial and the Problem Kids on Friday starting at 8 p.m. and kick off Basel week on Wednesday with Mochilla en Miami alongside a live performance by Zynzelay, THEESatisfaction and Georgia Anne Muldrow.

Dec. 9


Space Presents  Dark Light Sessions with Fedde Le Grande

34 NE 11th St., Miami; www.clubspace.com
Fedde Le Grand is taking over Club Space as part of his North America Take Over tour to bring you the Dark Light Sessions alongside Louis Puig. Tickets are currently $30 in advance.

Start the party a night early with LA Riots on Saturday. 

Amazing Sundays at Nikki presents Bob Sinclar
1 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach; www.nikkibeach.com
The Sunday beach event at Nikki Beach Miami presents international superstar DJ Bob Sinclar alongside Bruno Robles and Felipe Kaval this Sunday in honor of Art Basel.  He’s taking over the decks following the signature Sunday brunch (11 a.m.-4 p.m.).  Tickets are currently $20 in advance. Also note UR1 Music & Art Festival ticketholders will be granted access with proof of ticket and are excluded from the cover fee.

Treehouse Miami presents Heroes Miami the Magic Art
323 23rd Street, Miami Beach; www.treehousemiami.com
Cocoon Heroes Miami and LINK Miami Rebels take Art Basel out with a bang with special guests Dubfire and Stacey Pullen and more as they showcase the “Into The Magic” theme from Cocoon Heroes. Doors open at 11 p.m.

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Baselmania Miami Beach 2013 will see the debut of the Herzog& Meuron designed Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM). Several exhibitions are planned, including a massive Ai Weiwei show that will include several new works. The Rubell Family Collection will be showing Chinese contemporary artfrom their collection. MoCA North Miami will have a British YBA sensation Tracey Emin showcase. VHI will have an blowout party at the Scope Fair in Miami Beach on Friday night of Miami Basel Week from 8pm-12pm. This will be at the same time the spectacular 20 block live music street block party happens in the Wynnwood Art District of Miami. There will be multiple stations of sponsored bands. And do not miss Wynnwood Walls, the gigantic street art display showcase that is refreshed every year for Art Basel Miami Beach with the best international street artists. In recent years there were free cocktails and fresh popcorn made on the spot. Its overrun with fabulous young people from Miami mixed with the Art Basel crowd. Don’t miss Design Basel. Last year it was the most up-in-the-clouds exhibition in Miami. Astounding design works by history making artists.

Vincent Johnson, The October Paintings, 2013, in progress.

Several new fun and amazing restaurants and bars are in the works in Miami and Miami Beach. Zahad Hadid is building a condo skyscraper in downtown Miami. Miami Beach and places such as Coral Gables are especially enjoyable and relaxing places to stay even before the fireworks begin and the art fair action commences. Brooklyn’s superstar Lucali pizzeria has opened in Miami Beach. A 3-D video of performance artist Marina Abramovic will be in a glass pavillion in Wynwood and will be shown nightly. Their will a “floating chalet” on the Miami river. Ai Weiwei is having a retrospective at the new PAMM art museum in Miami. The Rubell Family Collection is showcasing contemporary art by 28 Chinese artists in their collection. The FAILE BÄST Deluxx Fluxx Arcade 2013 Miami Beach takes place at a vacant retail space on the corner of 16th Street and Washington Avenue. The public is invited to tackle the games from December 3 – 8. New York’s Sean Kelly Gallery will showcase the work of Kehinde Wiley in the Level 5 space for the 2013 fair at the 1111 Lincoln Road building designed by Herzog & Meuron. There will be a 3-D video portrait of performance art great Marina Abramovic playing in Miami during Art Basel in Miami Beach. “A Portrait of Marina Abramovic” screens nightly, December 4-7, in the Jewel Box at the YoungArts campus, 2100 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami.

http://www.vincentjohnsonart.com

NOW ONTO THE MASSIVE COLLECTION OF INFORMATION ON WHAT WILL BE HAPPENING DURING ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2013. HOPE TO SEE YOU THERE!

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HAUTE LIVING

Hautest Art Basel Collaboration: Colette Paris et the Alchemist Miami Beach

1111_Lincoln_Road_at_nightWho would thought that global competitors in the fashion industry would essentially collaborate? Well, it has happened, and it just happens to be during Art Basel Miami Beach 2013.

In 1997, way ahead of it’s time, the genius concept store of Colette in Paris, France, opened its doors, starting a global trend. A multi-faceted boutique with edge, taking risks, full of designer, unattainable and select items, well, this is what made Colette a destination. I was a customer when I was fifteen, and ‘till this day, I still see people waiting in line to enter. In 2007 on Miami Beach, newlyweds Erica and Roma Cohen opened the Alchemist; a Miami version of Colette, carrying top labels with a very curated selection of merchandise for that jet-set, well dressed woman and man. What do Sarah, Roma and Erika have in common? Style is the blue-blood that runs through their veins.

So what happens when you put two creative minds together? Magic!

This Art Basel at 1111 Lincoln Road on the fifth floor of the garage, there will be a ‘drive-thru’ experience, where you can purchase items ‘to-go.’

Sarah Lerfel Andelman, founder of Colette, tells me “we always love to come to Miami. During Art Basel, it’s even more special. When we visited 1111 Lincoln Road, we fell in love with this location. And suddenly, after the drive-in at the Grand Palais in Paris last June, we had this idea of the drive-thru and so, to us it’s a real dream come true, especially to be able to do it with Alchemist in Miami. Roma and Erika Cohen are the best possible partners. They’re passionate about what they’re doing and that’s our rule! We’ll have an incredible selection of art items, we’re super proud to bring them to Miami in exclusivity… ”

COLETTE 2ND FL
Colette, Paris. Where I Got My First Pair of Chloe Pants at Fifteen. Spoiled?

Now let me walk you through this. You will arrive to the garage at 1111 Lincoln Road (if you are not a Miami native, this address serves many functions including retail, food and parking that encompass one block) and downstairs when you pull in to the “Colette Art Drive Thru at Alchemist.” There will be a window where you order from a virtual menu of specially chosen items. Then you will continue around the drive-thru and wait for a “carhop” (girls on roller skates) to bring out your order. But rather than malts, burgers, and fries, shoppers will access only exclusive items developed by Colette’s Sarah and Alchemist’s Roma and Erika Cohen for the concept. Participants include some of the most compelling names in art, fashion, and culture working today, such as Kehinde Wiley, Zaha Hadid, Daniel Arsham, Julia Chiang, Pharrell x Moncler, José Parla, Kenzo x Toilet Paper, Kitsuné, Chrome Hearts, Luis Morais, and Thom Browne. The window will also be stocked with Colette and Alchemist shop picks (graffiti artist André for Orangina, Jean-Michel Basquiat x Nuit Blanche, “Happy Meals” featuring a limited edition Keith Haring coloring book from the 80’s once belonging to Richard Prince). In addition, specially co-branded drive-thru items designed by Yorgo & Co. will be available for purchase during the Art Basel installation and at Colette. Alchemist, which has a longstanding Miami Art Basel affiliation with New York’s Sean Kelly Gallery, is also pleased to showcase the work of Kehinde Wiley in the Level 5 space for the 2013 fair.

fred
I Would Never Miss a Colette Event! Even with An Allergy Attack, I Went To The Reed Krakoff Book Signing in Paris with Neige Guiton and Fred Dechnik.

Now, Here is a Preview of What is Available at the Drive Through……

Visuels-OranginaAndré-002
Orangina Collaboration with Andre. Oui, Merci!
THOM B
Thom Brown Winter Set, J’Adore!
MONCLER
Moncler Sunnies. Yes Please!
ETNIA YVES KLEIN
Etnia and Yves Klein Blue Merger? I’ll Take Two!
BASQUIAT CANCLE
Nuit Blanche Basquiat Candle…. mmmmm…..
Piston Head general invite copy

PISTON HEAD: Artists Engage the Automobile

FAILE and BÄST Take Third “Deluxx Fluxx Arcade” to Art Basel Miami Beach

By | Nov 19, 2013 | 7:27 am |

FAILE and BÄST Take Third "Deluxx Fluxx Arcade" to Art Basel Miami BeachImage via Allen/Cooper

Last month, we interviewed the Brooklyn-based art-making duo of Patrick McNeil and Patrick Miller, who produce under the collective moniker FAILE. Though they gave us an intimate look into the workings of their collaboration, they neglected to mention a new version of their Deluxx Fluxx, a custom-made arcade of interactive artworks, is set to debut soon.

The duo, along with fellow Brooklyn artist BÄST, heads to Art Basel Miami Beach December 5 – 7 with the third edition of their custom-designed pinball machines, custom-programmed video games, and “psychedelic foosball” tables, all playable by the public. Check out some in-process images of the arcade above, straight from the Brooklyn studio of McNeil and Miller.

Not only are the games unique each to themselves but the playable cabinets are also works of art, the caliber of which only FAILE and BÄST could achieve. The result of each device is a multimedia artifact that forces one to reconsider the arcade games of years past—even Pong was art in this context.

This is a dynamic the artists, too, have recognized. To let them describe it:

Deluxx Fluxx challenges the contemporary art world’s fixation on ideas of relational aesthetics and democratization, and gives the audience a chance to genuinely engage with the work without feeling the pressure of the traditional gallery environment.

The Deluxx Fluxx first showed at The Outsiders in London, in 2010. Later that year, a version showed in New York City.

The FAILE BÄST Deluxx Fluxx Arcade 2013 Miami Beach takes place at a vacant retail space on the corner of 16th Street and Washington Avenue. The public is invited to tackle the games from December 3 – 8.

Game on!

Adore Nightclub Miami’s grand opening set during Art Basel, December 5th – 8th

adore-nightclub-miami

Gear up folks, it looks like two of Vegas’ biggest nightlife connoisseurs, Cy Waits and Cory McCormack, will “take their talents” to South Beach starting this December. The newly developed Adore Nightclub, located beside the beautiful Boulan Hotel on the famous Collins Avenue, has set its grand opening during Art Basel from December 5th through the 8th. Adore will be Miami Beach’s first brand new venue to open its doors in nearly a decade and comes fully equipped with exquisite decor, 12,000 square feet of space, a Funktion-One sound system, and custom 3D LED sphere.

Both partners come from prestigious backgrounds; Cy Waits was formerly the managing partner of XS Nightclub inside of the Encore hotel (alongside twin brother Jesse Waits), Drai’s afterhours in Bill’s Gamblin Hall and Saloon Las Vegas, and Drai’s Hollywood in the W Hotel while Cory McCormack of Ocean First Group was the mastermind of nightlife in the Hard Rock Hotel Las Vegas and is widely credited for the success of Body English, Rehab, and Wasted Space.

Joining these two as the Talent Buyer of Adore will be Alex Omes, a co-founder and former partner of Ultra Music Festival, and the face of the Surfcomber and Clash pool parties at the SLS Hotel.

With Adore’s presence destined to heat up the already ultra-competitive South Beach nightlife scene, dance fans the world over should look forward to a Vegas-caliber nightlife experience during their yearly pilgrimage to Miami Music Week.

CIFO FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES DAILY PROGRAMMING DURING ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2013

ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH 2013

Permission To Be Global / Prácticas Globales
Latin American Art from the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection

Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation, Miami (CIFO): December 4, 2013–February 23, 2014

PREVIEW (Press Only): Tuesday, December 3, 2013, 4–6 p.m.

OVERVIEW

The Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO) and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), join forces on the exhibition Permission To Be Global / Prácticas Globales: Latin American Art from the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection, featuring contemporary works by artists from across Latin America. Drawn from the holdings of Ella Fontanals-Cisneros, founder and president of CIFO, the exhibition premieres during Art Basel Miami Beach (December 4-8, 2013) and then travels to the MFA in March of 2014. Incorporating sculpture, painting, photography, video, installation and performance art from 1960 to the present, Permission To Be Global / Prácticas Globales features 61 artists from over ten countries in Central and South America and the Caribbean. Together their works explore what it means “to be global,” when free and equal cultural exchange is still limited by the power dynamics of globalization. After years of underrepresentation at home and abroad, many of these artists are now leading the discourse about contemporary art’s reach across international borders, while still reflecting social and political issues at home. At CIFO, the exhibition will feature more than 80 works, and visitors to the MFA will experience 60 of these in the Museum’s first-ever exhibition dedicated to contemporary Latin American art. Permission To Be Global / Prácticas Globales showcases many artists never before seen in New England, along with new installations and performances inspired by the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection.

CIFO Special Events during Art Basel Miami Beach 2013

Wednesday, December 4 – Sunday December 8

Special Art Basel Times 9:00am – 4:00pm

Breakfast Served Daily 9:00am – Noon

Open to the Public. Free Admission

Wednesday, December 4:

9:00 am Exhibition officially opens. Permission To Be Global. Latin American Art from the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection.  In view from December 4, 2013 – February 23, 2014.

  • CIFO Art Space
  • Open to the Public. Free admission.

Permission To Be Global is a collaboration between the Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation (CIFO) and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA) featuring more than 80 works, dedicated to contemporary Latin American art. Featuring sculpture, painting, photography, video, installation and performance art from 1960 to the present, the exhibition explores how avant-garde artists from the Caribbean, Central, and South America have become integral to discourses on “international” contemporary art after years of exclusion from institutions at home and abroad.

11:00 am Talk: Cuauhtémoc Medina. Doctor in History and Theory of Art (PhD) from the University of Essex, UK, and a degree in History from Universidad Autónoma de México.

  • CIFO Art Space Auditorium
  • Open to the Public. Free admission.

December 4, 2013 – February 23, 2014:

9:00 am Interactive installation of a Spanish-language used book store by artist Pablo Helguera. Donceles Bookstore, 2013. Courtesy of the Artist and Kent Gallery, New York.

CIFO Art Space Library

Open to the public. Free admission.

Proceeds to benefit a charity. TBD

Thursday, December 5:

11:00 am Guided Tour. Permission To Be Global. Latin American Art from the Ella Fontanals-Cisneros Collection.

CIFO Art Space Auditorium

Open to the public. Free admission.

Tour guided by exhibition curators, Jen Mergel, Robert L. Beal, Enid L. Beal and Bruce A. Beal Senior Curator of Contemporary Art, and Liz Munsell, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art & MFA Programs; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Friday, December 6:

CIFO Annual Brunch hosted by Ella Fontanals-Cisneros.

Private event. By Invitation Only.

Friday, December 6

9:00 am Interactive sculpture with taffy by artist Valeska Soares. Push Pull , 2013. Courtesy of the Artist and generously funded by Kreemart

CIFO Art Space Piazza

For the exhibition at CIFO, Soares has proposed a new interactive outdoor installation through Kreemart, Push Pull (2013), which extends her explorations with sugar. For Soares, sugar is a culturally significant material associated with overconsumption and excess in American society. Although ripe with connotations around the innocence of childhood, it may lead to intoxication and addiction. Sun-warmed masses of taffy will hang from metal hooks traditionally used to pull and stretch the candy, and visitors are invited to consume chunks of the slowly stretching sculptures. Push Pull parodies the line drawn.

Saturday, December 7:

11:00 am Panel discussion.  Brazil in Latin America: Jen Mergel, Liz Munsell,  Luiz Camillo Osorio

The discussion will bring together Curators Jen Mergel the Beal Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at Museum of Fine Arts Boston and Liz Munsell the Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at Museum of Fine Arts Boston; with Luiz Camillo Osorio the Chief Curator at the Museum of Modern Art Rio de Janeiro (MAM-RJ), to discuss the place of Brazilian contemporary art within conceptions of Latin American art.

ART NEWS

  Latitude, Brazilian Galleries,Art Basel Miami Beach
Latitude: Brazilian Galleries Announce Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 Programme - ArtLyst Article image

Latitude: Brazilian Galleries Announce Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 Programme

DATE: 14 NOV 2013

Latitude: A platform for Brazilian Art Galleries Abroad has announced its programme for Art Basel in Miami Beach 2013. This December, the project will support 13 Brazilian galleries in showcasing leading contemporary art at Art Basel’s 12th edition in Miami Beach. As the premiere international destination for Latin American galleries, the project will also see 9 additional Brazilian galleries displaying work at five satellite art fairs across Miami; Context, Scope, Art Miami, Untitled Art Fair and the Brazil Art Fair.

Stand Highlights for the galleries exhibiting at Art Basel in Miami Beach 2013 in the Galleries Sector include Casa Triângulo, which will present installation works by the New York based collective Assume Vivid Astro Focus and renowned artists Albano Afonso, Eduardo Berliner, Joana Vasconcelos, Mariana Palma, Sandra Cinto and Vânia Mignone. Galeria Fortes Vilaça will showcase work by up and coming Brazilian artist Erika Verzutti, who is also currently participating in the 2013 Carnegie International and Bienal do Mercosul. Works by Mariana Mauricio, Mauro Piva and Sandra Gamarra will be displayed by Galeria Leme and Galeria Luisa Strina will exhibit work by Argentinean artist Eduardo Basualdo. Galeria Nara Roesler will show geometric structures by renowned Brazilian artist Artur Lescher alongside works by Antonio Dias, Carlito Carvalhosa, Lucia Koch and Paulo Bruscky. Verme lho will showcase Jonathas de Andrade’s political video installation ‘The Uprising.’

Within the other sectors at Art Basel in Miami Beach, Luciana Brito Galeria will present new work by acclaimed artist Marina Abramović within the Kabinett Sector as well as a video work by Fyodor Pavlov-Andreevich within the Film Sector. Within the Nova Sector, Mendes Wood DM will exhibit site specific installations by Deyson Gilbert and Marina Simão and Anita Schwartz Galeriawill bring a selection of works by three renowned Brazilian artists; Abraham Palatnik, Antonio Manuel and Carla Guagliardi whose practices have all remained relevant since the 1950s and 1960s within Brazil. Silvia Cintra+Box4 will showcase the work of emerging artist Laercio Redondo and Baró Galeria will showcase the work of artist Lourival Cuquinha for the Positions Sector.

Nine Brazilian galleries will display work at satellite art fairs across Miami and five of these including Central Galeria, Galeria Estação, Logo, Mercedes Viegas Arte Contemporânea and Paralelo Gallery will be showing work for first time at an international fair. Logo will be exhibiting at SCOPE (3-8 December 2013) and the Brazil Art Fair (4-8 December 2013), Galeria Pilar will showcase works by Andre Ricardo, Montez Magno and Rodrigo Sassi at UNTITLED Art Fair (4-8 December 2013).Athena Contemporânea will display works at Art Miami’s sister fair CONTEXT which focuses on mid-career and emerging artists (3-8 December 2013). Bolsa de Arte de Porto Alegre will exhibit at Art Miami (3-8 December 2013) and in addition to Logo, Central Gale ria, Gal eria Estação, Mercedes Viegas Arte Contemporânea, Paralelo Gallery and Galeria Emma Thomas will have stands at the new Brazil Art Fair (4-8 December 2013).

Latitude: Platform for Brazilian Art Galleries Abroad announces programme for Art Basel in Miami Beach 2013, 5 – 8 December 2013.

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ARTINFO

November 11, 2013, 12:17 pm

3-D Video Portrait of Marina Abramovic Coming to Miami During Art Basel

 marina-3d-miami

News that there will be a 3-D video portrait of performance art great Marina Abramovic playing in Miami during Art Basel in Miami Beach next month may provoke compulsive eye-rolling for many, as it did initially for me, but artist Matthu Placek’s six-minute, one-shot short — in which Abramovic appears nude and ghostly pale inside her under-construction performance art center — is in fact very beautiful and surprisingly moving. Abramovic’s intense energy and piercing, tear duct-opening stare translate uncannily well to 3-D.

Placek’s short film, “A Portrait of Marina Abramovic” (2013), will make its public debut in Miami next month during ABMB at the “Jewel Box,” a modernist pavilion in Wynwood whose all-glass exterior is clad in stained-glass windows that fill the space with color. At a recent preview screening in New York, Placek described the series of musical cycles through which visitors will move up the building’s staircase, around its interior, and into the screening area. The space is currently in a raw state similar to that of the future Marina Abramovic Institute in Hudson, which Placek captures spectacularly in an epic crane shot that makes sensitive use of the 3-D format. The soundtrack, a splendid translation of an ancient Greek song performed by Serbia’s Svetlana Spajic, amplifies the film’s power.

The National YoungArts Foundation — who, with Visionaire, co-produced the film — is making over the Jewel Box building with a design by Frank Gehry, but in the meantime it will host screenings of Placek’s film every day during ABMB (December 4-7) for free, every 15 minutes, beginning at 6pm. “I originally wanted it to be from dusk until dawn,” Placek said at the preview screening, “but we’ll probably have to shut it down a little earlier — maybe 3am.”

“A Portrait of Marina Abramovic” screens nightly, December 4-7, in the Jewel Box at the YoungArts campus, 2100 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami.

— Benjamin Sutton

Sagamore’s Art Basel Exhibit Pays Tribute to Moving Image

👤by Visual Arts News Desk November 14 http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwart/article/Sagamores-Art-Basel-Exhibit-Pays-Tribute-to-Moving-Image-20131114

Sagamore's Art Basel Exhibit Pays Tribute to Moving Image

Art collectors and owners of the Sagamore Hotel, Martin and Cricket Taplin-also the Art Hotel’s curator-are pleased to announce the installation – FRAMING THE MOVING IMAGE. The exhibition explores the way artists capture, compose and represent traditions and histories, as well as the changing material landscapes – locally and globally – through the moving image.

FRAMING THE MOVING IMAGE will open to the public at Sagamore, The Art Hotel, during Art Basel Miami Beach 2013, providing an opportunity for guests to experience and to view this new installation of innovative film, video and performance art, among other select works.

The entire installation was curated by John Hanhardt, world renowned film and media art curator, and embraces the diverse styles and genres from the avant-gardes, beginning with 1950s and 1960s, to contemporary reflections of present media landscape that will highlight the variety of practices shaping today’s art world. In addition to media art, Mr. Hanhardt has selected, as part of the installation, several photographs from The Cricket Taplin Collection.

Hanhardt has held curatorial posts at MoMA, the Walker Art Center, the Whitney Museum of Art, and the Guggenheim Museum. He is currently consulting as Senior Curator for Media Arts at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Works permanently installed as part of FRAMING THE MOVING IMAGE, include the following:

  • In Interstices, a site-specific piece created for the Sagamore, Bill Beirne collaborates with a Miami-based dance company to choreograph a series of live performances that re-enact behaviors that might ordinarily take place in areas monitored by surveillance cameras. The performances will be captured by cameras located around the hotel and projected on a widescreen video monitor in the lobby.
  • Shannon Plumb’s Paper Collection (2007) takes a playful look at fashion models and the fashion industry in a video narrative in which she plays all the characters.
  • Star Spangled to Death (1956-1960), by legendary avant-garde artist Ken Jacobs, is a seminal eight-hour film featuring Jack Smith and other artists. A virtuosic collection of filmed and found footage, it comments on American history and the state of the economy.
  • The Water Series, a multi-channel meditation on the movement and texture of water by Ernie Gehr, is displayed on screens installed on the hotel’s garden wall. Gehr is one of the leading artists of the international avant-garde cinema, and his films are distinguished by their formal elegance and treatment of filmic space and time.
  • Between the Frames (1983-1991), by Spanish artist Antoni Muntadas, is a major multi-part series that examines the art world through chapters that explore the roles played by dealers, collectors, galleries, museums, docents, critics, and the media. Produced over 20 years ago, it is an extraordinary representation of the art world and a revealing reflection of what has changed, and what has not. This is the first time it will be presented on a hotel channel.
  • Reflecting on the history of film technology, Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder’s “Threadbare” is a film projector wrapped in 16 mm film footage that creates a silhouette suggesting Mickey Mouse’s head. The richly imagined sculpture offers profound insights into the nature of the medium.
  • Kathleen Graves is a new-media artist who creates a richly imagined body of work out of the materials of technology and everyday life. Her playful and beautiful Bot Studies, 2013, are small sculptures made from packaging, plants, and found materials. They refer to robots and botanical drawings and are a rendering of possible new life forms.
  • Takeshi Murata is one of the most exciting new artists exploring digital moving-image making. The elaborate, Night Moves (2013), a collaboration with Billy Grant, creates an imaginary narrative centered on a virtual studio floating through space. Hypnotic and beautiful, it represents a new artistic sensibility that appropriates from cartoons, Anime, and popular culture.
  • Raphael Montanez Ortiz created a number of important avant-garde films, including Newsreel (1958), which deconstructed found footage, and Dance Number 22 (1993), a computer-laser video that manipulates a sequence from a Marx Brothers film.
  • The photographer Peter Moore interpreted the avant-garde events of the 1960s and 1970s in New York City. Iconic images such asUntitled (Nam June Paik performing at Café Au Go Go), November 9, 1964;Trisha Brown, “Man Walking Down the Side of a Building,” 80 Wooster St., NYC, 1970; and Untitled (Joan Jonas, “Organic Honey’s Vertical Roll), 1973, are evidence that he was a key artist of his generation.

John Hanhardt participated in advising the Sagamore on the selection of the new, cutting-edge equipment and technology necessary to best present the installation.

—-

Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 Fairs Guide

By Morgan Golumbuk/ Miami New Times
Published Thu., Nov. 7 2013 at 7:05 AM

art_basel_entrance.jpg
Photo by Ian Witlen
Art Basel Miami Beach 2012

Art Basel is in the air. With just about a month to go before the 2013 edition of the world-renowned Miami Beach blowout, it’s time to get serious about planning your Basel path.From Wynwood to Little Havana to the traditional Miami Beach hot spots, these fairs have something for everyone. Cultist gives you the lowdown on when, where, and what to expect during Art Basel 2013.

Art Basel in Miami Beach. December 5 – 8. Miami Beach Convention Center, 1901 Convention Center Dr., Miami Beach. $42 day ticket, $90 permanent pass; artbasel.com.

Art Miami.December 3 – 8. Midtown Miami, 3101 NE First Ave., Miami. Wednesday/Thursday/Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. $35 one-day pass; art-miami.com.

ArtSpot Miami International Art Fair. December 4 – 8. Midtown Miami
, 3011 NE First Ave. at NE 30th St., Miami. Wednesday 6 p.m. – 10 p.m., Thursday noon – 8 p.m., Friday/Saturday noon – 9 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. $15 general admission; aldocastilloprojects.com.

Arts Kuala Lumpur. December 4 – 8. Midtown Miami, 2235 NW Second Ave., Miami. Wednesday Vernissage, 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. (invitation only), Thursday private viewing, 7 p.m. – 10 p.m., Thursday through Saturday, 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. Admission is free; artskualalumpur.com.

Aqua 13 Art Miami. December 4 – 8. Aqua Hotel, 1530 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Thursday noon – 9 p.m., Friday/Saturday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission: $15 one-day pass; aquaartmiami.com.

Brazil Art Fair. December 4 to 8. Midtown Miami, 3501 NE Midtown Blvd., Miami. Wednesday/Thursday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., Saturday/Sunday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Admission: $15; brazilartfair.com.

CONTEXT. December 3 – 8. 
Midtown Miami, 3101 NE First Ave., Miami. Wednesday/Thursday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. $35 one-day pass; contextartmiami.com.

design_miami_2011_floor.jpg
Photo by Ian Witlen
Design Miami/ 2011

Design Miami/. December 4 – 8. Meridian Avenue and 19th Street, Miami Beach Convention Center. Wednesday 11 a.m. – 9 p.m., Thursday – Saturday noon – 8 p.m., Sunday noon – 6 p.m. Ticket prices TBA; designmiami.com.Fridge Art Fair NYC: The Miami Popsicle Project.December 5 – 8. Performing Arts Exchange, 337 SW Eighth Street, Miami. Thursday – Saturday 2 p.m. – 1 a.m., Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. $15 suggested donation; fridgeartfair.com.

Ink Miami Art Fair. December 4 – 8. Dorchester, 1850 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. Wednesday noon – 5 p.m., Thursday – Saturday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Admission: free; inkartfair.com.

Miami Project. December 3 – 8. Midtown Miami, NE 29th Street and NE First Avenue, Miami. Tuesday 4:30 p.m. – 10 p.m., Wednesday 11 a.m. – 5:30 p.m., Thursday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. $25 one-day pass; miami-project.com.

Miami River Art Fair.December 5 – 8. 
Miami Convention Center, 400 SE Second Ave., Miami. Thursday 6 p.m. – 11 p.m., Friday/Saturday noon – 8 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. Free with online registration; miamiriverartfair.com.

NADA Art Fair Miami Beach. December 5 – 8. The Deauville Beach Resort, 6701 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. Thursday 2 – 8 p.m., Friday/Saturday 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission: free; newartdealers.org.

New Material Art Fair. December 5 – 8. Chesterfield, Lily and Leon Hotels, 855 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. Friday/Saturday noon – 8 p.m., Sunday noon – 6 p.m. Ticket prices TBA; newmaterialartfair.com.

scope_art_2011.jpg
Photo by Ian Witlen
SCOPE Miami 2011

Pulse Miami. December 5 – 8. The Ice Palace Studios, 1400 North Miami Avenue, Miami. Thursday 1 – 7 p.m., Friday/Saturday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. $20 general admission; pulse-art.com.Red Dot Miami. December 3 – 8. Midtown Miami, 3011 NE First Ave. at NE 31st St., Miami. Tuesday 6 – 10 p.m., Wednesday – Saturday 11 a.m. – 8 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. $15 one-day pass; reddotfair.com.

SCOPE Miami Beach. December 3 – 8. SCOPE Pavilion, 1000 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach. Wednesday – Sunday 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. $25 general admission, $15 for students, free for VIP cardholders; scope-art.com.

Select Fair Miami. December 5 – 8. Catalina Hotel, 1732 Collins Ave, Miami Beach. Thursday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. $15 suggested donation; select-fair.com.

SEVEN. December 4-8. Wynwood, 31 NW 29th St., Miami. Wednesday 1 p.m. – 8 p.m., Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. Admission is free; seven-miami.com.

Spectrum Miami. December 4 – 8. Midtown Miami, 3011 NE First Ave. at NE 30th St., Miami. Wednesday 6 – 10 p.m., Thursday noon – 8 p.m., Friday/Saturday noon – 9 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. $15 general admission; spectrum-miami.com.

UNTITLED. Art Fair. December 4 – 8. Ocean Drive and 12th Street in Miami Beach. Wednesday – Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. $20 general admission; art-untitled.com.

Zones Art Fair Miami. December 3 – 9. Design District, 3850 N. Miami Ct., Miami. Tuesday through Monday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Admission is free; zonesartfair.com.

Follow Cultist on Facebook and Twitter @CultistMiami.

=================

HAUTE LIVING

Tracey Emin’s sculpture "You have no idea how safe you make me feel".
Tracey Emin’s sculpture “You have no idea how safe you make me feel” will be on view in ABMB’s Kabinett sector.
Read more at http://la-confidential-magazine.com/living/articles/la-art-lovers-art-basel-2013#vzvXwHF2EjpSXxIq.99

Living / LA Art Lovers Head East for Art Basel 2013

LA Art Lovers Head East for Art Basel 2013



by sue hostetler

Untitled, 2013, by French contemporary artist Bernard Piffaretti.Untitled, 2013, by French contemporary artist Bernard Piffaretti, will be a part of LA gallery Cherry and Martin’s exhibit at Art Basel Miami Beach.

Art Basel in Miami Beach is the premier fair in America,” says Jeffrey Soros, esteemed local art collector and MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus, while discussing the upcoming show in Florida. “Not only does one get a great snapshot of the art market, the state of art at the moment in one glimpse—but also how contemporary art registers beyond the art world.”

As the contemporary art world hurtles into the annual fall whirlwind of auctions, exhibitions, and institutional galas, Art Basel easily stands out among them all. Launched in 2002, the show quickly established itself as the most prestigious in the world, drawing the crème-de-la-crème of international curators, dealers, artists, and collectors (like Soros) every year. The show, which helped transform Miami into a cultural hub, has grown to include not only a selection of 258 galleries and representation from 31 countries, but also cutting-edge performances, films, talks, and music.

MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus and longtime art collector Jeffrey Soros.Miami heat! MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus and longtime art collector Jeffrey Soros hops to Art Basel Miami Beach.

One of the most impressive examples of art transforming the public sphere in Miami the last few years has been the Public sector, staged in Collins Park in collaboration with the adjoining Bass Museum of Art, which will be curated this December by Nicholas Baume, director of New York’s Public Art Fund. “We are delighted to now be working with Nicholas,” says Marc Spiegler, director of the three Basel shows—Miami Beach, Basel, Switzerland, and, this year, Hong Kong. “I have known him for almost 10 years, and we have been following with great enthusiasm what he has been doing since joining PAF. We think he will bring a similar brilliance, as seen in his Tatzu Nishi Columbus Circle project last year, to Art Public in December.”

The Miami show, running December 5–8 at the Miami Beach Convention Center, will conclude a year of incredible excitement and growth for the Art Basel brand. “We launched our first show in Hong Kong in May—a moment the whole team had worked toward for the past three years,” Spiegler says. “It was very special seeing everything finally come together. And in Switzerland in June we were able for the first time to make use of the new exhibition halls designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the renowned Basel architects. Now we are looking forward to Miami…. It will be an amazing show with a particularly strong lineup of galleries from the United States and Latin America, plus new galleries from Europe and Asia, including Tang Contemporary Art from Beijing and Singapore Tyler Print Institute.”

New2! 5 by LA artist Math Bass.New2! 5 by LA artist Math Bass will be on view in the Nova sector.

A strong focus will surely be on The Perez Art Museum Miami (formerly the Miami Art Museum), which has been under construction for almost three years in Bicentennial Park. The hotly anticipated grand reopening (which also includes the new Herzog & de Meuron–designed building, erected on what looks like stilts, a response to “storm surge protection,” we’re told) is set for December 4. It will feature exhibitions by several artists, among them Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei’s “According to What?,” which illustrates that political and cultural issues encompass multiple art forms. Keeping visitors inside may prove difficult though; the museum boasts a dramatic wraparound terrace, extensive landscaping, and incomparable views of Biscayne Bay.

But the real attention-grabber in December may be Miami’s newest resident artist, notorious British bad girl Tracey Emin, who will be celebrating her first US retrospective at North Miami’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Emin, who recently bought an apartment in South Beach and now splits her time between Florida and England, will show a collection of her renowned neon pieces in “Angel Without You,” also opening December 4. To honor the occasion, the Hotel Fountainebleau has adorned all of its beach towels with the words “kiss me kiss me cover my body in love,” a message from one of her featured works.

Tracey Emin’s sculpture "You have no idea how safe you make me feel".
Tracey Emin’s sculpture “You have no idea how safe you make me feel” will be on view in ABMB’s Kabinett sector.

“I spend a considerable amount of time at the main fair,” Soros says. “I love the proximity of the convention center to the beach and hotels. And there is a Latin vibe in Miami that I’ve yet to experience elsewhere in the States. Also, the private collections are a real treat. Collectors like the Rubells and de la Cruzes are so active, it’s fascinating to see what they’ve been up to.” Soros, a seasoned veteran of Art Basel in Miami Beach has made several key purchases over the years in many different mediums. “What I buy at the fair varies year to year. One year when I was feeling particularly curmudgeonly, I came away empty-handed, but otherwise I end up with something. Personal highlights have been sculptures by Giuseppe Penone and Tony Cragg.”

Spiegler thinks attendees, particularly younger collectors, are going to be most intrigued by the newly added sector, Edition, dedicated to limited-edition pieces and prints presented by 13 galleries. These works tend to be more moderately priced and represent an attractive entry point into the collecting market. Introducing new collectors to contemporary art is actually top of mind for the Basel team. “Art fairs—especially international ones like Art Basel—are definitely becoming more and more important in this context,” Spiegler explains. “They provide a global platform for galleries to meet new collectors from around the world, make new connections with museum directors and curators, and introduce artists to new audiences. Our shows do not become bigger because of a strong market—they become better.” Art Basel Miami Beach takes place December 5–8.

Recommended Stories

photography courtesy of tracy emin and Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong (you have no idea); courtesy of overduin and kite (new2! 5)

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LA Art Lovers Head East for Art Basel 2013



by sue hostetler

Untitled, 2013, by French contemporary artist Bernard Piffaretti.Untitled, 2013, by French contemporary artist Bernard Piffaretti, will be a part of LA gallery Cherry and Martin’s exhibit at Art Basel Miami Beach.

Art Basel in Miami Beach is the premier fair in America,” says Jeffrey Soros, esteemed local art collector and MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus, while discussing the upcoming show in Florida. “Not only does one get a great snapshot of the art market, the state of art at the moment in one glimpse—but also how contemporary art registers beyond the art world.”

As the contemporary art world hurtles into the annual fall whirlwind of auctions, exhibitions, and institutional galas, Art Basel easily stands out among them all. Launched in 2002, the show quickly established itself as the most prestigious in the world, drawing the crème-de-la-crème of international curators, dealers, artists, and collectors (like Soros) every year. The show, which helped transform Miami into a cultural hub, has grown to include not only a selection of 258 galleries and representation from 31 countries, but also cutting-edge performances, films, talks, and music.

MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus and longtime art collector Jeffrey Soros.Miami heat! MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus and longtime art collector Jeffrey Soros hops to Art Basel Miami Beach.

One of the most impressive examples of art transforming the public sphere in Miami the last few years has been the Public sector, staged in Collins Park in collaboration with the adjoining Bass Museum of Art, which will be curated this December by Nicholas Baume, director of New York’s Public Art Fund. “We are delighted to now be working with Nicholas,” says Marc Spiegler, director of the three Basel shows—Miami Beach, Basel, Switzerland, and, this year, Hong Kong. “I have known him for almost 10 years, and we have been following with great enthusiasm what he has been doing since joining PAF. We think he will bring a similar brilliance, as seen in his Tatzu Nishi Columbus Circle project last year, to Art Public in December.”

The Miami show, running December 5–8 at the Miami Beach Convention Center, will conclude a year of incredible excitement and growth for the Art Basel brand. “We launched our first show in Hong Kong in May—a moment the whole team had worked toward for the past three years,” Spiegler says. “It was very special seeing everything finally come together. And in Switzerland in June we were able for the first time to make use of the new exhibition halls designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the renowned Basel architects. Now we are looking forward to Miami…. It will be an amazing show with a particularly strong lineup of galleries from the United States and Latin America, plus new galleries from Europe and Asia, including Tang Contemporary Art from Beijing and Singapore Tyler Print Institute.”

New2! 5 by LA artist Math Bass.New2! 5 by LA artist Math Bass will be on view in the Nova sector.

A strong focus will surely be on The Perez Art Museum Miami (formerly the Miami Art Museum), which has been under construction for almost three years in Bicentennial Park. The hotly anticipated grand reopening (which also includes the new Herzog & de Meuron–designed building, erected on what looks like stilts, a response to “storm surge protection,” we’re told) is set for December 4. It will feature exhibitions by several artists, among them Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei’s “According to What?,” which illustrates that political and cultural issues encompass multiple art forms. Keeping visitors inside may prove difficult though; the museum boasts a dramatic wraparound terrace, extensive landscaping, and incomparable views of Biscayne Bay.

But the real attention-grabber in December may be Miami’s newest resident artist, notorious British bad girl Tracey Emin, who will be celebrating her first US retrospective at North Miami’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Emin, who recently bought an apartment in South Beach and now splits her time between Florida and England, will show a collection of her renowned neon pieces in “Angel Without You,” also opening December 4. To honor the occasion, the Hotel Fountainebleau has adorned all of its beach towels with the words “kiss me kiss me cover my body in love,” a message from one of her featured works.

Tracey Emin’s sculpture "You have no idea how safe you make me feel".
Tracey Emin’s sculpture “You have no idea how safe you make me feel” will be on view in ABMB’s Kabinett sector.

“I spend a considerable amount of time at the main fair,” Soros says. “I love the proximity of the convention center to the beach and hotels. And there is a Latin vibe in Miami that I’ve yet to experience elsewhere in the States. Also, the private collections are a real treat. Collectors like the Rubells and de la Cruzes are so active, it’s fascinating to see what they’ve been up to.” Soros, a seasoned veteran of Art Basel in Miami Beach has made several key purchases over the years in many different mediums. “What I buy at the fair varies year to year. One year when I was feeling particularly curmudgeonly, I came away empty-handed, but otherwise I end up with something. Personal highlights have been sculptures by Giuseppe Penone and Tony Cragg.”

Spiegler thinks attendees, particularly younger collectors, are going to be most intrigued by the newly added sector, Edition, dedicated to limited-edition pieces and prints presented by 13 galleries. These works tend to be more moderately priced and represent an attractive entry point into the collecting market. Introducing new collectors to contemporary art is actually top of mind for the Basel team. “Art fairs—especially international ones like Art Basel—are definitely becoming more and more important in this context,” Spiegler explains. “They provide a global platform for galleries to meet new collectors from around the world, make new connections with museum directors and curators, and introduce artists to new audiences. Our shows do not become bigger because of a strong market—they become better.” Art Basel Miami Beach takes place December 5–8.

Recommended Stories

Read more at http://la-confidential-magazine.com/living/articles/la-art-lovers-art-basel-2013#vzvXwHF2EjpSXxIq.99

LA Art Lovers Head East for Art Basel 2013



by sue hostetler

Untitled, 2013, by French contemporary artist Bernard Piffaretti.Untitled, 2013, by French contemporary artist Bernard Piffaretti, will be a part of LA gallery Cherry and Martin’s exhibit at Art Basel Miami Beach.

Art Basel in Miami Beach is the premier fair in America,” says Jeffrey Soros, esteemed local art collector and MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus, while discussing the upcoming show in Florida. “Not only does one get a great snapshot of the art market, the state of art at the moment in one glimpse—but also how contemporary art registers beyond the art world.”

As the contemporary art world hurtles into the annual fall whirlwind of auctions, exhibitions, and institutional galas, Art Basel easily stands out among them all. Launched in 2002, the show quickly established itself as the most prestigious in the world, drawing the crème-de-la-crème of international curators, dealers, artists, and collectors (like Soros) every year. The show, which helped transform Miami into a cultural hub, has grown to include not only a selection of 258 galleries and representation from 31 countries, but also cutting-edge performances, films, talks, and music.

MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus and longtime art collector Jeffrey Soros.Miami heat! MOCA Board of Trustees president emeritus and longtime art collector Jeffrey Soros hops to Art Basel Miami Beach.

One of the most impressive examples of art transforming the public sphere in Miami the last few years has been the Public sector, staged in Collins Park in collaboration with the adjoining Bass Museum of Art, which will be curated this December by Nicholas Baume, director of New York’s Public Art Fund. “We are delighted to now be working with Nicholas,” says Marc Spiegler, director of the three Basel shows—Miami Beach, Basel, Switzerland, and, this year, Hong Kong. “I have known him for almost 10 years, and we have been following with great enthusiasm what he has been doing since joining PAF. We think he will bring a similar brilliance, as seen in his Tatzu Nishi Columbus Circle project last year, to Art Public in December.”

The Miami show, running December 5–8 at the Miami Beach Convention Center, will conclude a year of incredible excitement and growth for the Art Basel brand. “We launched our first show in Hong Kong in May—a moment the whole team had worked toward for the past three years,” Spiegler says. “It was very special seeing everything finally come together. And in Switzerland in June we were able for the first time to make use of the new exhibition halls designed by Herzog & de Meuron, the renowned Basel architects. Now we are looking forward to Miami…. It will be an amazing show with a particularly strong lineup of galleries from the United States and Latin America, plus new galleries from Europe and Asia, including Tang Contemporary Art from Beijing and Singapore Tyler Print Institute.”

New2! 5 by LA artist Math Bass.New2! 5 by LA artist Math Bass will be on view in the Nova sector.

A strong focus will surely be on The Perez Art Museum Miami (formerly the Miami Art Museum), which has been under construction for almost three years in Bicentennial Park. The hotly anticipated grand reopening (which also includes the new Herzog & de Meuron–designed building, erected on what looks like stilts, a response to “storm surge protection,” we’re told) is set for December 4. It will feature exhibitions by several artists, among them Chinese contemporary artist Ai Weiwei’s “According to What?,” which illustrates that political and cultural issues encompass multiple art forms. Keeping visitors inside may prove difficult though; the museum boasts a dramatic wraparound terrace, extensive landscaping, and incomparable views of Biscayne Bay.

But the real attention-grabber in December may be Miami’s newest resident artist, notorious British bad girl Tracey Emin, who will be celebrating her first US retrospective at North Miami’s Museum of Contemporary Art. Emin, who recently bought an apartment in South Beach and now splits her time between Florida and England, will show a collection of her renowned neon pieces in “Angel Without You,” also opening December 4. To honor the occasion, the Hotel Fountainebleau has adorned all of its beach towels with the words “kiss me kiss me cover my body in love,” a message from one of her featured works.

Tracey Emin’s sculpture "You have no idea how safe you make me feel".
Tracey Emin’s sculpture “You have no idea how safe you make me feel” will be on view in ABMB’s Kabinett sector.

“I spend a considerable amount of time at the main fair,” Soros says. “I love the proximity of the convention center to the beach and hotels. And there is a Latin vibe in Miami that I’ve yet to experience elsewhere in the States. Also, the private collections are a real treat. Collectors like the Rubells and de la Cruzes are so active, it’s fascinating to see what they’ve been up to.” Soros, a seasoned veteran of Art Basel in Miami Beach has made several key purchases over the years in many different mediums. “What I buy at the fair varies year to year. One year when I was feeling particularly curmudgeonly, I came away empty-handed, but otherwise I end up with something. Personal highlights have been sculptures by Giuseppe Penone and Tony Cragg.”

Spiegler thinks attendees, particularly younger collectors, are going to be most intrigued by the newly added sector, Edition, dedicated to limited-edition pieces and prints presented by 13 galleries. These works tend to be more moderately priced and represent an attractive entry point into the collecting market. Introducing new collectors to contemporary art is actually top of mind for the Basel team. “Art fairs—especially international ones like Art Basel—are definitely becoming more and more important in this context,” Spiegler explains. “They provide a global platform for galleries to meet new collectors from around the world, make new connections with museum directors and curators, and introduce artists to new audiences. Our shows do not become bigger because of a strong market—they become better.” Art Basel Miami Beach takes place December 5–8.

Recommended Stories

Read more at http://la-confidential-magazine.com/living/articles/la-art-lovers-art-basel-2013#vzvXwHF2EjpSXxIq.99

Audemars Piguet Set to Unveil Artwork at Art Basel Miami

Audemars-Piguet-Galerie-Perrotin-Kolkoz_Curiosity_Miami-Marine-Stadium_Original-620x465

Luxury watchmaker Audemars Piguet has teamed up with the Galerie Perrotin to present a new artwork at Art Basel Miami. The manufacture and the contemporary art gallery will unveil “Curiosity”, a new work by French artist duo Kolkoz.

“Curiosity” will take the form of a chalet floating in front of the Miami Marine Stadium, a floating stage which now stands unused. The snowy chalet will be perched on top of an “iceberg” in the midst of Miami’s sun and sand. Benjamin Moreau and Samuel Boutruche, who make up Kolkoz, frequently create installations that explore the interchange between the real and the virtual realms. Last year, their “Luna Park” recreated the lunar landing site of Apollo 11 in the form of a live football pitch on Miami Beach.

The installation will host Audemars Piguet events throughout Art Basel week. The brand will also have a booth in the Collectors’ Lounge, which will feature a retrospective on the Royal Oak and a showcase of works by acclaimed British photographer Dan Holdsworth.

Photo courtesy Audemars Piguet.

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grub street

French bakery Ladurée coming to South Beach

 Laduree

By Lesley Abravanel |

Hyper luxe French bakery Ladurée is opening in October on Lincoln Road in Miami Beach, according to Grub Street.

The frou frou Parisian macaronerie, also known for its pan foie gras and black truffle omelets will also feature champagne bar and collection of Art Deco inspired macarons.

The Grub Street story says it will open at 1108 Lincoln, currently

home to Anthropologie

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MIAMI NEW TIMES

Art Basel Miami Beach

Heineken “Light Your Night” to Illuminate Art Basel, Destroy Grand Central

By Hannah Sentenac Tue., Nov. 5 2013 at 10:30 AM
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Courtesy of Kevin Arrow

We could all use a little more luminosity in our lives, so we’re pretty stoked about Heineken’s plans for Art Basel. The beer brand is bringing the glow this December with its “Light Your Night” installation at, you guessed it, Light Box at Goldman Warehouse.

This epic lineup of fluorescent events will include kinetic light motion installations, video mapping demos and interactive light shows. And in the “Light Your Night Challenge,” artists will compete to score a sweet trip to Amsterdam (an artistic Shangri-La if there ever was one). We got the inside scoop from Heineken and one of the competitors.

See also: Heineken Goes 305: Artists And Guests Party Hard to Celebrate New Wynwood Murals

The folks involved will include multi-media artists Yuri Tuma, Juan Carlos Zaldivar, Clifton Childree, Brandon Opalka, and Kevin Arrow. Childree had some interesting things to say about what’s bound to go down at this blindingly bright Basel adventure.

“Mega watt hot steamy competition! Because there’s gonna be so many lights,” says Childree. “I anticipate a lot of extension cords, power strips (high demand), light bulbs, duct tape, etc.”

As far as the unique qualities of light as art, Childree says, “Light helps draw attention, fill space, touches and incorporates the viewer.”

While the artists work has to incorporate the campaign’s colors, graphics, and/or logo into their light installations, those are the only restrictions. It won’t be a Heineken branding bonanza, in other words.

The artists’ work will go on display on December 3rd. Attendees will win, too, since they’ll be doling out free Heineken during the exhibition.

In addition to the above, one of the coolest elements of the overall lineup is bound to be the video mapping installation scheduled for the side of Grand Central. It’ll incorporate the building’s architecture to create an optical illusion, showing the ultra-club crumbling during an eight-minute film loop on December 7th, just as people are leaving Basel Castle.

Hang on folks – Basel is almost here. There’s a light at the end of the tunnel, and it looks like a bottle of Heineken.

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MIAMI NEW TIMES

Art Basel Miami: Pop-Up Biergarten to Serve Florida Craft Beers

By Hannah Sentenac Mon., Nov. 26 2012 at 10:50 AM
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Art Basel and booze go together like Andy Warhol and Campbell’s tomato soup. So it’s only fitting that a pop-up biergarten would make its way to Basel. Chefs Andres Barrientos and James Bowers (of Aaron’s Catering) are pairing up with Mixed Media Collective and Gaudi Castro to launch the temporary brewpub, Basel Biergarten, and it’s setting up shop at the Wynwood Cigar Factory’s “The Factory Art Show.”         The best part: It’s all about the Florida brews, baby. As part of the “Drink Like a Local” campaign, the art installment of sorts will offer Cigar City, Monk in the Trunk, Michael’s Genuine, Native Brewing, Tequesta, and Due South on tap. The chef duo will also simultaneously launch Miami Smokers, a charcuterie house serving candied bacon and other artisanal smoked meats.

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Courtesy of Basel Biergarten

They’ll have an eating and drinking area set up with seats, potted palms, and local shrubbery, as well as tunes by a DJ and live art. The surrounding art show should also offer some interesting eye candy in the form of works by 131, Abstrak and Toofly, and others.

Basel price tags should look a lot more reasonable after a few pints of Cigar City Jai Alai.

Booze Hound

Basel Biergarten to Pop-Up in Wynwood

By Hannah Sentenac Fri., Nov. 1 2013 at 10:00 AM
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via Wikimedia Commons

Last year, one of Art Basel’s biggest hits was nowhere near the beach. Instead, it was a pop-up bar selling Florida brews and smoked meats to Wynwood revelers. And for the second year in a row, the popular Basel Biergarten is back. Come December 5, they’ll be setting up shop at 2600 NW Second Avenue.  The focus of the event is local: local artists, local beer, local musicians. We work closely with Brown Distributing and support their Drink Like a Local campaign,” says co-founder Andres Barrientos. He and James Bowers are also the dudes behind Miami Smokers, and they’ve partnered with some other folks to re-create the biergarten. But it’s not only about brews. In keeping with Art Basel, there will be art, too. “Our good friend Danny Fila, AKA Krave, will be doing some live art — potentially a whole mural. He’s also working on securing five more local artists that will be painting throughout the days. Their work will be auctioned on Saturday night. Details are still vague on this, but this is what we’re working towards,” he explains. They’re also working with Gummdrops music to get some local bands onsite. They plan to have two live sets per day and a DJ for the rest of the time. In addition, their employees will be getting a thorough brew-training. “We’re also working hard to train our girls and give them knowledge about beer,” he adds. There won’t be any food trucks this year, but Miami Smokers will be selling their goods on site, so hungry revelers will have plenty to eat. The biergarten will be open from December 5 – 7 at 2600 NW Second Ave. with a “soft opening” and Miami Smokers Kickstarter launch party on Wednesday, December 4.

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HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

The Hollywood Reporter Reveals the Industry’s Top 25 Art Collectors

8:15 AM PDT 10/31/2013 by Edited by Mark Miller, Degen Pener and Jeanie Pyun

In THR’s inaugural Art Issue, Pharrell loves Takashi Murakami, Brian Grazer is jonesing for Jeff Koons, Sean Combs is into power art shopping: As A-listers and industry insiders hit a new level of sophistication with collecting — and sticker shock is not an option.

Spencer Lowell

This story first appeared in the Nov. 8 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.

There’s a serious love affair going on between Hollywood and the art world. Exhibit A: In May, a charity art auction organized by Leonardo DiCaprio raised $38 million in one night and set sales records for 13 artists. Exhibit B: A month later, Paramount chairman and CEO Brad Grey stepped up to join Brian Grazer, Michael Lynton and Bryan Lourd on the entertainment-heavy board of LACMA. Exhibit C: the artist-actor hybrid that is James Franco.

Suddenly, everyone in town seems to have gone collecting mad. In an industry once dominated by a few powerful collectors (David Geffen, Michael Ovitz), there’s now a deeper and younger bench of players passionate about art, from agents (CAA’s Joel Lubin, UTA’s Pete Franciosa) and actors (Neil Patrick Harris) to execs (HBO’s Michael Lombardo) and managers (Brillstein Entertainment Partners’ JoAnne Colonna, Scooter Braun). “There’s a lot of people in the industry who have great taste who are being exposed to great art,” says producer and LACMA board member Steve Tisch. “I know a number of collectors who have gotten into collecting in the past five or 10 years, and their passion for building their collection is fantastic.”

It’s a convergence that was inevitable. As the entertainment world’s 1 percent have grown more sophisticated — and want the world (or at least their peers) to know it — the L.A. art world is on the rise, generating buzz in Hollywood’s backyard. Masters such as John Baldessari and Ed Ruscha have been joined by a swelling rank of wunderkinds who sell out shows (Mark Grotjahn, whose paintings go at auction for more than $1 million, sold out his last show at Culver City’s Blum & Poe before it opened) and earn MacArthur fellowships (painter Mark Bradford) and public followings (photographer Catherine Opie, street artist Shepard Fairey). And L.A. is on a cultural building spree, which includes Beverly Hills’ new Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Eli Broad‘s Broad Museum due to open in 2014 across from MOCA and the upcoming Academy Museum.

Entertainment players are giving back, too — not just by serving on boards, but with hefty donations, including Tisch’s $467,500 contribution to LACMA to buy Christian Marclay‘s film The Clock and former UPN chief Dean Valentine‘s gift of 50 important sculptures to the Hammer. “L.A. is finally a place that people are proud to call home,” says Hammer Museum director Ann Philbin, whose board boasts UTA’s Jeremy Zimmer and Peter Benedek, CAA’s Michael Rubel, Gersh’s Bob Gersh and WME’s George Freeman. “It’s no longer a place they’re passing through, a place they have to live in. I think a lot of these [industry leaders] are simply becoming better citizens, they’re starting to care about the cultural vitality of the city. The robust connections between the art world and the film industry are just getting stronger and stronger.” — MAXWELL WILLIAMS

Written by Gary Baum, Merle Ginsberg, Marissa Gluck, Tatiana Siegel, Rebecca Sun, Kate Sutton and Michael Walker. Karen Rhee contributed to this featuRE

Sean Combs
Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images
Sean Combs
Hip-hop artist

Combs made headlines when he steered his entourage into the Gagosian Gallery booth at Miami Beach Art Basel 2011.

At the time, he explained he was “just there to learn,” only this art student was accompanied by top-notch teachers: painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel and art adviser to the stars (well, at least Gwyneth Paltrow) Maria Brito. Combs scored a Tracey Emin neon for $95,000 at Lehmann Maupin, returning the following December to snag a mirrored sculpture by Ivan Navarro from Paul Kasmin Gallery for a reported $65,000, two gold flag paintings by Bay Area artist Andrew Schoultz and a $15,000 work by South African Brett Murray.

Combs clearly is a collector who buys with a wall in mind: In August, he put up for sale his Beverly Hills residence with its art collection attached.

U – Z
Pharrell
Katy Winn/Invision/AP
Pharrell Williams
Singer/songwriter/producer

The Grammy-winning singer and producer is a world-class collector of contemporary art.

His Miami residence houses the chaotic works of Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, Kaws and Takashi Murakami, whom Williams reveres as “the king of kings.” The two met through Emmanuel Perrotin, the hip Paris dealer, who drafted Williams not only for the DJ tables of his legendary Art Basel boat parties, but also for his skills as a furniture designer (his tip-toeing and tank-tread chairs kept clients coming back to Perrotin’s booth at 2009’s Design Miami).

Williams collaborated with Murakami on The Simple Things, a post-Warhol commentary on consumerism that sold for $2 million and included a diamond-encrusted cupcake, condom, Heinz ketchup bottle and other ephemera placed inside the jaws of a grinning Murakami monster. “When there’s a slight twist on things that we know to be normal,” Williams has said, “they really stand out.”

A – G
Ruth Bloom and Jake Bloom
Alexandra Wyman/Getty Images
Ruth and Jake Bloom
Jake and Ruth Bloom
Entertainment lawyer and former gallerist

Bloom and his wife have amassed one of the largest collections in the country, yet their foray started humbly.

Living in a one-bedroom apartment, the couple visited galleries as free entertainment. “It was something we could do and learn together,” says Ruth. Four decades later, the couple owns nearly 1,000 works, including pieces by dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, art darling Jeff Koons, local luminary John Baldessari and Matthew Barney, whose Vaseline Dumbbell they keep in their refrigerator, trotting it out for guests.

As a passion project, they resolved in the early 1990s to collect all 83 images from photographer Robert Frank‘s iconic 1958 book The Americans. They have 77, so, as Ruth laughs, “we’re almost there!”

A – G
Maria Bell Bill Bell
Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for Blum & Poe
Maria and Bill Bell
Bill and Maria Bell
Television producers

Maria, the former head writer of CBS’ The Young and the Restless, is best known in the L.A. art world for her visible role as board co-chair of the city’s Museum of Contemporary Art (she steps down Jan. 1).

The Northwestern art history major got her start collecting modestly priced George Hurrell photos. These days, her husband, Bill, goes deep on icons — Marcel Duchamp, Jeff Koons — while she champions the idiosyncratic, from Francesco Vezzoli to Mark Ryden.

“Your collection becomes your interpretation of how you see the world,” she says. “It’s very personal.”


Hollywood Insiders’ Art Club: Producer David Hoberman and Former UPN CEO Dean Valentine

8:00 AM PDT 10/31/2013 by Maxwell Williams
[1]Hoberman Valentine
Spencer Lowell
Hoberman (left) and Valentine

Call them collecting buddies: Over years of hitting galleries and art fairs, Symbolic Action’s Valentine has donated scores of pieces to the Hammer Museum while Hoberman works through a wish list that includes blue-chip artists from Rudolf Stingel and Cindy Sherman to Christopher Wool and Albert Oehlen.

A version of this story first appeared in the Nov. 8 issue of The Hollywood Reporter [2] magazine.

Dean Valentine calls it the art collectors’ version of a “golf club.” The head of Symbolic Action, a media investment firm, and prominent collector of contemporary art is seated in the offices of L.A.’s Hammer Museum in Westwood, where he is on the board of overseers. Film and television producer David Hoberman (The Muppets, The Fighter, Monk) sits nearby, listening intently. The only one missing from the club is high-profile entertainment attorney Craig Jacobson of Hansen Jacobson (whose clients include Ryan Seacrest and David Fincher.)

“It’s a collective,” Hoberman, also on the board at the Hammer, says. “It’s a group of people that love talking about art and looking at images.”

The trio has been spotted gallery hopping in Culver City and browsing the booths at the New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) art fair in Miami, and each has their own style. Hoberman’s collection in particular has been in flux since he started. “I started off collecting mid-century American art,” says Hoberman, who paid off a $120 tab to get a Claes Oldenburg print when he was 16. “Then, I couldn’t afford what I wanted to really have. I remember a [1950s and ’60s Bay Area artist Richard] Diebenkorn painting I couldn’t afford. I started hanging out with Dean and got into contemporary art, and ended up falling in love with that. I turned 60 last year, and what I wanted to do, for my kids, is buy more blue-chip contemporary art like Albert Oehlen, Rudolf Stingel, a beautiful large Cindy Sherman, Christopher Wool. I have a dozen pieces that will endure time. It’s my own instinct, really. Pepper that with still buying emerging artists.”

Valentine, by contrast, has been constant in his collection of young artists since he started collecting in 1995. “I was a journalist for a long time, so my interest is the most contemporary of the contemporary. Accumulating name-brand artists is not a meaningful pursuit to me. I’m more engaged with why somebody’s making what they’re making, what the changes are of the time, and why this generation’s different than the last,” says Valentine, the former president and CEO of UPN and president of Walt Disney Television.

Having collected for 15 years now, Valentine has seen the art world change greatly since the market crashed in the early ’90s. Back then, he says, you might be the only guest all day to a gallery, and gallerists were passionate about discussing work with interested visitors. “The fact that so much money has come into the art world has really altered everybody,” he says. “It’s changed the artists, it’s changed the relationship between artists and collectors, between collectors and gallerists, between gallerists and artists — it’s changed the landscape of the art world. These large galleries are starting to swallow up a large percentage of the business now, and making it hard for the medium guys, especially, to survive. Accessing work is harder, because you make a commitment to some artist’s work, and within a year or a year and a half, the artworks have gone from $10,000 to $150,000. That cuts out a vast number of people who would be collecting work. So, it’s turned much more into the ‘game’ of contemporary art rather than the collecting of contemporary art.”

STORY: Unique Features’ Bob Shaye and Michael Lynne’s Over-the-Top Art Collection [4]

Despite the mounting fiduciary issues facing the modern collector, Hoberman, Valentine and Jacobson have amassed some of the world’s best contemporary works. But maybe, as Hoberman suggests, it’s less perseverance than addiction, meaning there always needs to be a mindful eye toward the investment. “Collecting anything becomes an obsession,” he says with a grin. “It’s incredibly compulsive, and it’s hard to stop. Believe me, my business manager tells me to stop all the time. I know a lot of collectors who deal with that, or have wives who try to stop them. I don’t know a lot of people in the art world who aren’t conscious of what they’re paying and what something is worth. The one thing I will say though: No matter what something is worth, if you really love it, hold on to it.”

That said, Hoberman and Valentine agree that finding work that you love and work that is a wise investment are vastly different things. “The one thing I tell people who are interested in contemporary art is that good taste is the enemy of good collections,” says Valentine. “Yeah, buy what you like, if you actually know something about what you’re doing. But if you don’t, don’t buy what you like. You’re probably better off buying what you don’t like.”

And if you do find something you want, and for one reason or another the gallery won’t sell it to you, there are a lot of pipelines in the art world. “You figure out a way to get it,” says Hoberman. “If you can’t get it from the gallery, there are other dealers who can get you what you want. If you’re serious about wanting a piece, you’ll do what you have to do to try to figure that out. You can buy it secondary, or you can buy it from a dealer.”

STORY: Owen Wilson on Iconic SoCal Artist Ed Ruscha [5]

In the end, it’s important to remember that art collecting is something that should be done with good intentions and a mind toward civic duty. The collector is, for all intents and purposes, the top of the art world food chain, and a lot of artists and dealers rely on the collector. It’s no surprise then that Valentine’s most public move in the art world was a gift in 2007 to the Hammer of 10 years of sculpture by Los Angeles-based artists. “The idea of giving gifts to a museum and why people do it: Something that was a private passion should become a public good,” says Valentine. “That now can be shared by thousands or hundreds of thousands or millions of people for free. There’s often tax benefits, because it’s viewed as a transferring of a private thing to a public thing. In my case, I had this bizarre passion to collect sculpture from Los Angeles. Sculpture is notoriously difficult to collect. It’s hard to house — I was spending many tens of thousands of dollars a year to store it. Some of these artists, nobody had really bought their work. I liked it, even though I couldn’t show the vast majority of it. Unless you have a home that is 70,000 square feet, it’s not possible to show some of this work, so I just thought it was a way to really have an impact on the Los Angeles art community by giving this gift.”

Michael Ovitz
Mark Von Holden/Getty Images for Kimberly Ovitz
Michael Ovitz
Ex-CAA co-founder

With his brand of hard-edged negotiation tactics, Ovitz is credited with bringing Hollywood to the art world. Mentored by renowned collector Barry Lowen, then SoHo’s Mary Boone and later Pace Gallery’s Arne Glimcher, Ovitz became the first major industry player to sit on the board at the Museum of Modern Art.

Ovitz amassed more than 1,500 critical works, from standard-bearers such as Pablo Picasso, Mark Rothko and Roy Lichtenstein to young guns Sterling Ruby, Carol Bove, Isa Genzken and Roe Ethridge. To house it all, he commissioned Michael Maltzan to design a perforated-steel villa in Benedict Canyon, which Ovitz completed in 2011. Visitors are treated to a view of his prized Jasper Johns, White Flag, which holds pride of place between a Robert Rauschenberg and a Willem de Kooning.

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MIAMI NEW TIMES

Hollywood’s Top Art Collectors: Who to Watch For at Art Basel This Year

By Ciara LaVelle
Published Fri., Nov. 1 2013 at 12:00 PM

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kallerna/Wikimedia Commons
Pharrell at Basel? For sure.

In theory, Miami Art Week, anchored by Art Basel, is a string of days in which the world’s most cultured individuals descend on South Florida to appreciate fine culture. But as anyone who’s actually participated in Art Basel’s myriad parties, VIP lounges, and secret shows knows, it’s also about seeing and being seen. Especially if you’re famous.

The Hollywood Reporter ranked the top 25 art collectors in Hollywood this week. So who will we see at the biggest art event in the country this year? Here are our guesses.

See also: Art Basel Miami Beach 2012: Winners and Losers

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Richard Burdett/Wikimedia Commons

Sean Combs
The constantly evolving artist formerly known as Puff Daddy and P. Diddy and about a dozen other titles certainly has plenty in common with Wynwood’s ever-changing street art scene. But according to THR, Combs’ taste in art is far more upscale. In 2011, he reportedly showed up at Art Basel and dropped $65,000 on an Ian Navarro sculpture and another $15,000 on another work by South African artist Brett Murray. Maybe he’ll be back to bolster his collection again this year. But we wouldn’t

start our search for Diddy at MoCA’s Tracey Emin exhibit; Combs already owns one of the artist’s neon sculptures, valued at $95,000.Leonardo DiCaprio
Leo, on the other hand, has Wynwood experience; he was spotted wandering the streets and checking in at Panther Coffee in February. THR reports he’s a fan of Basquiat, who began his career as a graffiti artist. It’s unlikely he’ll show up just strolling around Wynwood during the busiest week of the year, of course. But VIP night at the Midtown fairs, on the other hand….

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idrewuk/Wikimedia Commons

Jay Z
He and wife Beyonce clearly loved their Art Basel experiences last year — there are about a dozen Instagram pics to prove it. And as THR points out, dude also likes to brag about his art collection in his songs, with verses like “I got Warhols on my hall’s walls.” Hmm, now where did we see Warhol art at Basel last year? Oh, that’s right: EVERY DAMN PLACE.

Elton John
According to TFR, John “has amassed one of the world’s most important photography collections, with an emphasis on portraits, celebrity and fashion.” Art Basel is one of the world’s most important combinations of celebrity and culture, so it only makes sense that he’d show up. Plus, the satellite fair Untitled will open its doors with a VIP event benefitting the Elton John AIDS Foundation. And if the rumors of the Liberace-esque Versace Mansion hosting an exhibit are true, you know he’ll be there, too.

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David Shankbone/Wikimedia Commons

Steve Martin
Martin called art collecting “my greatest hobby.” And while that may be true — the actor goes after works by classics like Picasso and Lichtenstein — he’d be insane not to visit Art Basel without entertaining Miami hipsters with a secret banjo show. Or maybe we’re just fantasizing.

Pharrell Williams
Pharrell’s been an Art Basel staple for years now, showing up at Basel Castle, dropping in on OHWOW exhibits, speaking at Design Miami. You know, typical hip-hop mogul stuff. THR reports that Williams’ tastes skew towards the contemporary; he even collaborated with his art hero, Takashi Murakami, on a piece called The Simple Things in 2009. Who knows what he’ll get up to this December.

Follow Ciara LaVelle on Twitter @ciaralavelle.

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Paper Magazine’s reports on what to Watch For at Art Basel This Year

PAPER MAGAZINE’S FIRST UPDATE FOR ART BASEL 2013 –

arty parties
Our Mega Guide to Art Basel Miami 2013: Part I
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Time to start the countdown to Art Basel Miami Beach 2013 with this, the first installment in our annual mega-guide to all the artsy-action on the beach. It will be the 12th edition of the fair, and the size and scope have grown so large that it’s almost impossible to take in all the satellite fairs, let alone all the local museums and galleries. AB/MB opens with their big VIP vernissage on Wednesday, December 4 and closes on Sunday, December 8, at the Miami Beach Convention Center.

Over the summer, the city’s commissioners awarded the internationally acclaimed starchitect Rem Koolhaas and his local partner Robert Wennett — owner of the Herzog & de Meuron designed parking lot at 111 Lincoln Road — the $1 billion bid to re-make the convention center and its surrounding 52-acre site. For now, AB/MB isn’t in jeopardy, but the scope of the new plan surely means that at some point in the future, things are going to change radically.

Screen Shot 2013-10-23 at 5.55.56 PM.pngRendering of Perez Art Museum Miami

Fans of the Swiss architects Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron will be able check out the architects’ Perez Art Museum Miami when it officially opens during AB/MB. The museum — formerly know as the Miami Art Museum — is moving into a brand new building in Museum Park just off of downtown Miami’s Biscayne Boulvard. On view during the week, there’s a big survey of works by the Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei and shows by Cuban painter Amelia Pelaez and Brazilian painter Beatriz Milhazes. It all kicks off with a member-only preview on December 3 from 4 to 9 p.m. with L.A.-based artists Los Jaichackers and music by Total Freedom. Then on Saturday night, December 7, there’s the official premiere gala.

The sands of South Beach are getting another fair this year when the Scope Miami pavilion moves to 1000 Ocean Drive at 10th Street. Their “Platinum Preview Gala” takes place on Monday night, December 2, from 5 to 8 p.m. and there’s a VIP opening on Tuesday. The public is invited to attend from December 4 to 8 from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. Again this year, Scope has partnered with VH1 with a big indoor lounge and a massive party on Friday night from 8 p.m. to midnight featuring a performance by “one of today’s hottest musical artists.” We’ll let you know who as soon as we find out.

Brazil will be getting lots of attention this year with over 40 galleries exhibiting at the new Brazil ArtFair running from December 3 to 8 in Woodson Park on NW 36th Street in Midtown. Their goal is “to go beyond your everyday art fair…with a private initiative for the promotion and internationalization of Brazil’s art market,” the fair’s founder Michel Serebrinsky explained to Art Info.

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Pérez Art Museum Miami Inaugural Exhibition Schedule

Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) announces the inaugural exhibition lineup for its new building, opening in Museum Park in December 2013. The wide-ranging roster of exhibitions examines the interpretation and appropriation of cultural and political identities, economic structures, and commodities generated by Miami’s diverse population and its position as a cross-cultural hub. The selection and presentation of artists, collections, and commissioned projects for PAMM is guided by the Museum’s mission to create dialogues across and through local, regional, and international contexts and to emphasize artists and projects that engage with traditions from the United States, the Caribbean, and Latin America. The curatorial program is also particularly attuned to the work of local artists and designers.

From focused exhibitions on the work of Cuban painter Amelia Peláez and  Haitian born, Miami-based artist Edouard Duval-Carrié to thematic presentations of the Museum’s permanent collection to major retrospectives on artists Ai Weiwei and Beatriz Milhazes and group exhibitions on the exchange of ideas between the Caribbean basin, Europe, and North Africa, PAMM’s upcoming projects serve as critical frames through which larger dialogues about recent history, migration, new cultural formations, and diverse ideologies can be structured.

Advance Exhibitions Schedule, 2013-2014:

Overview Galleries: AMERICANA
December 2013 – May 2015

The Museum’s permanent collection will be displayed thematically within six Overview Galleries that are positioned throughout the first two floors of the building. Collectively titled AMERICANA, these six galleries will present artwork produced by artists working in North, South, and Central America, and the Caribbean. The bi-lingual title of this presentation evokes North American vernacular collecting traditions, as well as a hemispheric perspective that looks across national and regional borders. This focus on the Americas serves to highlight the strengths of the collection, while at the same time reflecting the diverse audiences of the Museum―the majority of who have cultural ties to these areas of the world.

The six galleries that make up AMERICANA are arranged thematically, each space developed in the form of a short essay offering a focused view on a particular issue or set of preoccupations that have engaged artists from the Americas since the mid-20th century. Among the issues to be explored are relations between contemporary painting and craft traditions, legacies of constructivism and minimalism, and the connections between politics and violence. The spaces combine artworks produced at various historical moments over the last eight decades. The specific pieces and themes explored in AMERICANA will change over the course of 18 months, as these galleries are periodically re-configured.

Special emphasis has been placed on the presentation of artworks by artists currently living in Miami, as a way of highlighting the growing position of this city as an important site of art production internationally. AMERICANA additionally augments PAMM´s young collection with artworks borrowed from outstanding local collections, an organizing strategy that seeks to recognize these collections as resources for the constituents of Miami and South Florida.

Special Exhibition Galleries: Ai Weiwei: According to What?
December 2013 – March 16, 2014

Ai Weiwei, He Xie (detail)Ai Weiwei: According to What? is the first major international survey of this artist’s multifaceted artistic oeuvre. The exhibition reveals the interrogative nature of Ai’s practice, and its role as an ever-questioning dialogue with the social, political, and cultural positions of his native China and the world at large. Featuring work from the last 20 years, the exhibition includes his early photographic works—images taken when he was a young artist living in New York and traveling throughout the U.S.—and the large-scale sculptures for which he is best known. These sculptures, often made from modified found objects, suggest the irreverent style of Ai’s work and reconfigure materials in new and evocative ways. With a broad formal range, Ai has continuously challenged possible meanings and modes of art making, most recently employing the Internet and its global reach as a platform for activism and expression. His provocative works are an exploration of the transformative potential of contemporary art, which he has said is “not a form but a philosophy of society.” PAMM’s presentation of this exhibition, originally organized by the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo, will feature new work, including a large-scale, site-specific installation. The exhibition design was also specially conceived by the artist and Herzog & de Meuron to be in dialogue with the new building architecture.

Focus Gallery: Photography from the Collection
December 2013 – July 27, 2014

This exhibition presents a varied selection of photographs drawn from the museum’s permanent collection, with a particular emphasis on the Cowles Collection, a gift of more than one hundred iconic works of the 20th century including photographs by Edward Steichen, Andy Warhol, and Rineke Dijkstra. Relying on contemporary strategies for organizing and understanding information, the exhibition will incorporate sequential and salon-style hangs in its installation. Within this format, new modes of visual literacy— created by the ever-growing influence of digital media and the way in which images circulate and are indexed through the Internet and by a continued interest in the form of the archive—are brought to bear on the museum’s strong and expanding collection of photographs. Allowing the viewer to see the works through visual cues and historical connections, looking at the image within the photograph as well as relationships between photographs, this exhibition seeks to engender new ‘ways of looking.’

This show will employ digital didactic labels and text on iPads as part of PAMM’S growing engagement with technology and new platforms for education in the galleries.

Focus Gallery: A Human Document: Selections from the Collection of Ruth and Marvin Sackner
December 2013 – May 25, 2014

Pérez Art Museum Miami will present an extensive selection of works from the Miami-based collection of Ruth and Marvin Sackner. Founded in 1979, this “archive of archives” initially focused on concrete and visual poetry—including rare manuscripts and published works by international luminaries such as Augusto and Haroldo de Campos, Oyvind Fahlström, and Eugen Gomringer. The collection subsequently grew to encompass a broader array of historic and contemporary works that synthesize word and image. Rooted in the early to mid-20th-century European avant-garde, the collection provides a unique lens through which to examine the foundational movements of modernism, including Italian Futurism, Russian Constructivism, Bauhaus, De Stijl, Dada, and Lettrisme, among others. The Sackners’ contemporary holdings are also expansive, with special strengths in artists’ books and “assemblings” (limited-edition groupings of materials by numerous contributors), as well as various subgenres such as typewriter art, performance poetry, and micrography (abstract or representational designs comprised of minuscule lettering). The installation begins with a rare, 1897 publication of “Un Coup de des” (A Throw of the Dice), by Stéphane Mallarmé, which is considered one of the first true examples of concrete poetry, and include hundreds of objects spanning more than a century of creative expression.

Focus Gallery: Amelia Peláez
December 2013 – February 23, 2014

PAMM will present a focused selection of works by Amelia Peláez del Casal (1896 – 1968), one of the most important Cuban painters of the modernist era. Alongside artists such as Carlos Enríquez, Wifredo Lam, Victor Manuel, and Fidelio Ponce de León, Peláez personifies the primera vanguardia—the first wave of Cuban artists who traveled to Europe before World War II, where they were exposed to Cubism, Surrealism, and other contemporaneous styles. When these artists subsequently returned to the island nation, they introduced the artistic innovations they had adopted abroad and then transformed them by incorporating aspects of their native cultural and national identities.

Peláez is best known for brightly colored, quasi-abstract compositions that feature decorative objects and ornamental architectural motifs, evoking the traditional domestic interiors of Havana. This exhibition will take a socio-historical approach and examine Peláez’s work in the context of early 20th century Havana’s changing material culture and urban landscape.

 

Project Gallery: Hew Locke
December 2013 – May 25, 2014

Hew Locke, For Those in Peril on the SeaFor Those in Peril on the Sea, 2011, is an installation by Hew Locke (b. 1959), a British artist of Guyanese descent. It consists of dozens of scaled-down replicas of ships suspended from the ceiling, creating the impression of a massive exodus taking place throughout the architectural space above viewers’ heads. It features a broad range of vessel types, from cigarette boats, catamarans, and cruise liners to ragged fishing skiffs and timeworn cargo ships. In light of Miami’s history as the site for numerous waves of immigration—particularly from the Caribbean, and specifically by sea—For Those in Peril on the Sea will have a particular resonance for the Museum’s audiences. With its significant links to the South Florida community, this installation, part of PAMM’s permanent collection, promises a powerful initial experience for visitors to the new building.

Project Gallery: Monika Sosnowska
December 2013 – September 28, 2014

Monika Sosnowska

Born in Ryki, Poland, Monika Sosnowska (b. 1972) is one of the most celebrated Eastern European artists of her generation. Focusing on urban and architectural space, her work involves surreal, tableau-like installations as well as large objects made of industrial materials that engage the walls, floors, and ceilings of the exhibition space. This commissioned project will be located in PAMM’s double-height Anchor Gallery, one of four spaces in the new building that will be dedicated to installations by single artists. The artists selected for these galleries are each invited to make multiple trips to Miami to share their process with PAMM’s audiences through public lectures, workshops, and other special programs.

Yael Bartana, (1st part of trilogy “and Europe will be stunned”) Mary Koszmary (Nightmares)Project Gallery: Yael Bartana
December 2013 – April 20, 2014

Born in Israel, Yael Bartana (b. 1970) has been commissioned to create a new work for PAMM in conjunction with the Israeli Center for Digital Art, Holon. Among the most celebrated artists of her generation, Bartana lives between Tel-Aviv and Berlin. Her early video work, both documentary and staged, explores social phenomena that illuminate the complexity of contemporary life, particularly within Israel. More recently, Bartana has embarked on a long term, multi-platform work …and Europe will be stunned, a video trilogy and body of related works, with which she represented Poland in the 54th Venice Biennale (2011). Critically acclaimed, this work has demonstrated Bartana’s acuity as both a filmmaker and as an artist deeply attuned to the most pressing political issues of our time. For her project at PAMM Bartana is researching and producing a work in Sao Paulo focused on the rise of Pentecostalism.

Bouchra Khalili, Speeches: Malcolm X. From the Speeches series (video installation, 5 single channels)Project Gallery: Bouchra Khalili
December 2013 – February 23, 2014

Bouchra Khalili (b. 1975) was born in Casablanca and currently lives and works in Paris. Her works, which take the form of single- and multi-channel videos and films as well as photographs, employ a mode of poetic documentation to investigate the experiences of identity, immigration, and transience. Reflecting the nomadic and often transnational state of existence that defines life for many people throughout the world, Khalili illuminates the realities, emotional, intellectual, and tangible, of an increasingly mobilized world. Using language and an understated visual sensibility, Khalili’s videos offer a moving account of the personal and subjective within larger political and economic spheres. Khalili has been invited to create a new video work based on research undertaken in New York for PAMM’s anchor galleries.

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COMPLEX MAGAZINE

Hennessy and Pratt Team Up For an Art and Design Competition

By | Oct 17, 2013 | 12:56 pm |

Hennessy and Pratt Team Up For an Art and Design CompetitionImage via Matthew Molino

Hennessy V.S has teamed up with Pratt Institute to create an art and design competition. They have asked nine art and design graduate students at Pratt to explore the theme “Never Stop. Never Settle,” Hennessy’s mantra. The three best works, which were determined in July, will appear at the Epic Hotel at Art Basel Miami Beach and will also be promoted on Hennessy’s website and social channels. In this way, the students will gain valuable exposure of their works.

This competition kicked off in June when Pratt students submitted works under the theme “Wild Rabbit,” which is Hennessy’s campaign platform. André De Castro won with his work Project Movements, a series of portraits that feature people trying to make a difference in the world. The second and third place winners were Mike Finklestein and Stephen Mondics. All three artists will display their winning works in Miami.

“When academic institutions and corporations collaborate, students can benefit from having a springboard to experiment,” said Jeff Bellantoni, faculty advisor and graduate communications design chair at Pratt Institute. “Students from different backgrounds and disciplines took advantage of this unique opportunity and fully immersed themselves in a collaborative exchange—one that sparked an innovative range of new work.”

This is the second year Pratt and Hennessy have joined forces for this competition. “The partnership between Pratt and Hennessy is very natural because both institutions share a passion for pushing the limits of individual potential,” said Senior Vice President of Hennessy, Rodney Williams.

Museum of Contemporary Art North Miami

Tracey Emin

December 2013 – March 2014

Tracey Emin

December 2013 – March 2014

MOCA will present the first major U.S. solo museum exhibition of Tracey Emin. Tracey Emin is organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art and is curated by Bonnie Clearwater.

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Upcoming Exhibition
Year of the Artist:
Contemporary Chinese Art from the Rubell Family Collection


December 4, 2013 – August 1, 2014
                       He Xiangyu, The Death of Marat, 2011, Fiberglass, silicone, fabric and leather, 17 x 69 x 39 1/4 in. (43 x 176 x 100 cm)

Year of the Artist: Contemporary Chinese Art from the Rubell Family Collection will fill all 27 galleries of the 45,000 square foot exhibition space, debuting during Art Basel Miami Beach 2013.

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'The Death of Marat'“The Death of Marat” (2011) by He Xiangyu. The work will be included in “Year of the Artist,” an upcoming exhibition at the Rubell Family Collection/Contemporary Arts Foundation in Miami. Source: Rubell Family Collection via Bloomberg

Bloomberg News

Miami Collectors Tap New China Artists for Art Basel Show

By Katya Kazakina
April 23, 2013

The influential Miami-based collectors Mera and Don Rubell will focus on contemporary Chinese art in their next exhibition for the 2013 Art Basel Miami Beach in December.

Titled “Year of the Artist,” the show will include stars like Ai Weiwei and Zhang Huan among about 25 artists, though the goal is to introduce many less-known names to the U.S.

“There’s a new generation of Chinese artists that is interesting to us,” said Mera Rubell in a telephone interview. “They have the world view and they are also dealing with the transformation of China itself.”

While the generation of artists who came of age during the Cultural Revolution has dominated the market in the 2000s, younger artists are starting to gain international attention.

The Ullens Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing opened its 2013 season with “ON/OFF: China’s Young Artists in Concept and Practice” which includes 50 commissioned works by 50 artists. Ukrainian billionaire Victor Pinchuk will mount an exhibition titled “China China” at his Kiev art center next month that focuses on both younger and older artists.

The Rubells, who will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary next year, have been collecting emerging art for decades. They bought their first photograph by Cindy Sherman for $25 and paintings by Jean-Michel Basquiat for $2,500. They are known for their trend-setting exhibitions, such as those focusing on Leipzig, Polish or black artists in the past decade.

Paving Way

“It’s a vote of confidence,” said Larry Warsh, New York- based collector of Chinese contemporary art. “It’s important that collectors like the Rubells pave the way in understanding Chinese art in the context of global contemporary art.”

The Rubells visited China six times in the past 12 years. With their last trip, in the fall of 2012, taking in more than 40 artist studios in Beijing, Shanghai, Xian, Guangzhou and Hangzhou.

“We took planes, trains, vans,” said Mera Rubell. “It was like a caravan.”

The couple spoke about the exhibition yesterday at a New York University diplomacy class taught by François Barras, Ambassador and Consul General of Switzerland.

“We are going to make every attempt to bring every artist to Miami for the opening,” Mera Rubell told the students, although not Ai, who is currently prohibited from leaving China.

At least two of his works will be included: his “Ton of Tea” sculpture, in which tea leaves are pressed to form a cube, and “Fairytale Chairs,” a group of 20 wooden Qing dynasty chairs.

“It’s going to be the culmination of the Chinese art we’ve been buying since 2001,” said Mera Rubell.

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Zahad Hadid 60 story condo tower will be located across from American Airlines arena in Miami at 1000 Biscayne boulevard.

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Zahad Hadid is also designing a parking structure on Collins avenue in Miami Beach


street view

 

 


interior view of parking ramps


circulation diagram

 

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The Miami Herald

Displays on the Bay: Upcoming exhibits at the Perez Art Museum Miami

When Miami Art Museum opens as Perez Art Museum Miami in its new Herzog & deMeuron-designed headquarters on Biscayne Bay, it will showcase exhibitions designed to speak to a Miami audience. Some have been displayed elsewhere; others are works being commissioned specifically for the new museum. All reflect South Florida’s international attitude. Here’s a rundown on the first year’s schedule of shows.

November 2013

Works by Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei, left, will inaugurate the Special Exhibition Galleries at the new museum. New works will be added to others such as ‘Colored Vases,’ ‘Map of China,’ ‘He Xie’ and ‘Ai Weiwei: Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn,’ left, previously shown in Washington, D.C., as part of the exhibition ‘Ai Weiwei: According to What?’

December 2013

For PAMM’s opening, Scottish artist Hew Locke will create a new arrangment of “For Those in Peril on the Sea,” featuring dozens of replicas of ships. It wlll be shown in PAMM’s Project Gallery through May 25, 2014.

December 2013

PAMM has commissioned a new work by Moroccan artist Bouchra Khalili, which will be displayed in the Project Gallery through Feb. 23, 2014. Here, an image from previous video, “Speeches: Malcolm X, 2012.”

December 2013

A newly commissioned work by Polish artist Monika Sosnowska will be shown in PAMM’s Anchor Gallery through Sept. 28, 2014. Here, her previous work, “Untitled, 2006,’ made of steel and enamel paint.

December 2013

Henryk Berlewi’s “Reklama Mechano, 1924” booklet is part of the collection of Miami’s Ruth and Marvin Sackner. Selections from the Sackner collection will be on display in PAMM’s Focus Gallery through May 25, 2014.

December 2013

PAMM has commissioned Israeli artist Yael Bartana to create a film or video work for the museum’s opening. Left, a clip from the first part of an existing work, the trilogy ‘and Europe will be stunned.’

December 2013

Berenice Abbott’s “Wall Street and Stock Exchange, 1933,” is part of the Cowles Collection of 20th Century Photography, a promised gift by Charles Cowles to PAMM. Selections from the Cowles Collection will be on display in the Focus Gallery through July 2014.

December 2013

A selection of works by Cuban modernist painter Amelia Pelaez del Casal (1896-1968) will be on display in PAMM’s Focus Gallery through Feb. 23, 2014. Here, a detail from “La piña, 1939.”

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Vincent Johnson: The October Paintings

October Painting 1 and 2, Los Angeles, California by Vincent Johnson

The October Painting 1 and 2, Los Angeles, California by Vincent Johnson

The October Paintings - numbers 3 and 4

The October Paintings – numbers 3 and 4 – The October Paintings (a new paintings project by Los Angeles based artist Vincent Johnson) – the paintings are at the underpainting stage. They will be allowed to dry in my studio and then a layer of white glaze will be added. That will dry. Then I will work on each work, layer by layer, allowing each layer to dry, or be worked or added to as I desire. Our car Roxy is in the background, her back arched as she defies a mushroom to move.

October Paintings 3 and 4 - three of three

The October Paintings (a new paintings project by Los Angeles based artist Vincent Johnson) – paintings 3 and 4. Taking advantage of the fabulous weather in LA.

October Paintings 3 and 4 - two of three

The October Paintings – paintings 1 and 2 (a new paintings project by Los Angeles based artist Vincent Johnson) – with our cat Roxy playing in the back yard.

October Paintings 5 and 6, underpainted on October 31, 2013. Van Nuys, CA

October Paintings 5 and 6, underpainting – layer one – October 31, 2013. Van Nuys, CA

October Paintings 5 and 6.on 11.01.13 no .3 October Paintings 5 and 6.on 11.01.13

The October Paintings, 2013, under painting layers, Los Angeles, California, by Vincent Johnson

The October Paintings, 2013, paintings one and two, under painting layers, Los Angeles, California, by Vincent Johnson

The October Paintings (a new paintings project by Los Angeles based artist Vincent Johnson)

The October Paintings – paintings one and two (a new paintings project by Los Angeles based artist Vincent Johnson)

The October Paintings are comprised of nine 4×4 foot oil on canvas paintings. These are the largest canvases I’ve worked on since my return to painting after two decades of working with photography. I was trained as a representational painter at Pratt Institute and at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. My graduate degree is in critical theory and painting from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. The works are a continuation of my exploration of the history of art materials, combined with using the layering techniques of representation to create singular new abstractions. This is my first time working on several large-scale canvases at once. What I’ve noticed over the years is that every significant work I’ve made eventually finds its way into the world, often through unanticipated opportunity.  The works are visceral, visually rich, emotively engaging. They follow the six large-scale paintings in the COSMOS SUITE that is also ongoing and was started in 2012, and the NINE GRAYSCALE PAINTINGS in LOS ANGELES that I completed in 2011. In my work I have always sought to reach for and produce imagery that lends itself to a serious consideration of the ideas that come to the mind when approaching the image. For me these works seek to substantiate themselves in the world, to be both evocative and provocative, beautiful and remarkable in both concept and realization. As these works are fully developed I will continue to record the journey am taken on with them, until they are complete.

OCTOBER PAINTING - Scumble glazing, second phase of the paintings.

OCTOBER PAINTING – Scumble glazing, second phase of the paintings.

 october-paintings-scumble-glazed-and-drying-in-studio.
October Paintings – scumble glazed and drying in studio.

During the scumble glazing layer of the painting, where I knock down the underpainting colors so that the next layers can deliver a fabulous punch, I thought about the magnificient, enormous paintings I saw this summer at the Menil Collection in Houston, by Cy Twombly and Mark Rothko. The high seriousness of Rothko’s chapel paintings was amazing. Yet on that day it would be my discovery of the excellence of Cy Twombly as a painter of the primordial and playful sublime that captivated my attention in his purpose built stand alone large gallery space that showcased his work far beyond the circular swirls I know but care nothing for at all. It seems that when Twombly switched to specific subject matter – whether it be abstract landscape paintings, where he had simply marvelous deep rich green works, or his overall giant abstractions, filled with playful and powerful singular and exciting moments, both satisfied in wonderful ways. I was fortunate to make two trips to Houston this summer. The Late Byzantine to Today was a marvel to behold; I also had no idea that the Menil is a world class repository of Surrealist art. I was also privileged to see the James Turrell retrospective at the MFA Houston, which itself will be expanding soon with a major new building devoted to modern and contemporary art. The Menil Collection itself will be adding seven new individual artist showcase galleries, which combined with their traveling shows will make Houston as important a center for seeing art as anywhere in the US outside of New York. I am looking at the nine 4×4 foot October paintings in my studio. Its the largest body of work I have ever produced as a painter. I can see so many possibilities in this new direction. It gives me reason to continue to push to get my work into the world, despite all of the difficulties I have experienced. Painting makes me see beyond my own being.

Vincent Johnson

Los Angeles, CA

Vincent Johnson: CV

Vincent Johnson received his MFA in Fine Art Painting from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California 1997 and his BFA in Painting from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1986. He is a 2005 Creative Capital Grantee, and was selected for the Baum: An Emerging American Photographer’s Award in 2004 and for the New Museum of Contemporary Arts Aldrich Art Award in 2007 and for the Art Matters grant in 2008, and in 2009 for the Foundation for Contemporary Art Fellowship, Los Angeles. In 2010 he was named a United States Artists project artist. His work has been reviewed in ArtForum, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, Art in America and Art Slant, and in over fifty differen publications in total. His photographic works were shown in the inaugural Pulse Fair Los Angeles. He has shown recently at Soho House (curated by ForYourArt, Los Angeles) and at Palihouse (curated by Los Angeles Nomadic Division), West Hollywood, and most recently in Photography 2013 at Another Year in LA gallery, West Hollywood. Johnson’s work has appeared in numerous venues, including The Studio Museum in Harlem (Freestyle (2001, The Philosophy of Time Travel, 2007, and The Bearden Project, 2011-2012), PS1 Museum, SK Stiftung, Cologne; Santa Monica Museum of Art, LAXART, Las Cienegas Projects; Boston University Art Museum; Kellogg Museum, Cal Poly Pomona; Adamski gallery of Contemporary Art, Aachen; Lemonsky Projects, Miami. His work has been published in over a dozen exhibition catalogs. He is currently working on a series of self published photography books that will focus on the U.S. cities of Los Angeles, San Francisco, Cleveland, Ohio, Miami, Florida and New Orleans. Johnson is also creating abstract paintings for his Cosmos Suite, that explores the practice of painting with the knowledge of historical painting practices. He is using the techniques of representation to create remarkable works of abstract art. At Beacon Arts Center, Los Angeles, he recently exhibited an entire suite of grayscale paintings. In the Spring of 2013, he exhibited a series of edgy photographic works at Another Year in LA gallery, West Hollywood, California. His work will be exhibited in the inaugural Open Project exhibition at the Palace of the Inquisition, Evora, Portugal, opening July 15, 2013.

Vincent Johnson lives and works in Los Angeles, California.

vincentjohnsonart@gmail.com

http://www.vincentjohnsonart.com

New Abstract Paintings: The Cosmos Suite 2012-2013

Hello

This is Vincent Johnson in Los Angeles.

Here are three new paintings are added to my Cosmos Suite of paintings 2.24.2013. These are the 7th, 8th and 9th paintings created in the Cosmos Suite. They are also the 4th, 5th and 6th large scale paintings in this body of work.

These Cosmos Suite paintings are created using various experiments in media and paint application. Johnson has done substantial research into the area of the history of painting materials and there use, and employs this knowledge in the production of his work.

There are now a total of nine paintings in the Cosmos Suite. Six of the nine paintings are thirty by forty inches in size. Three of the paintings – the originals in the suite, are twenty by twenty four inches in size. Each painting takes about a month to create as there is a three week drying time between the first and second layers of the painting. As the suite grows there will be additional sizes including larger works.

1A.artcat

Cosmos Suite: A Meeting Between Two Figures in Space

30×40 inches, oil on canvas by Vincent Johnson in Los Angeles (2013)

Poured Liquin in center of painting, added stripes of pure paint color to canvas, mixed with paint rags, dabbed till thick paint areas are leveled out.

Large areas of vertical yellow in painting. Layered canvas in thick paint in certain areas. Reminds me of seeing Gerhard Richter’s painting retrospective in London in the fall of 2011.

6A.artcat

Cosmos Suite: State and Grace

30×40 inches, oil on canvas by Vincent Johnson in Los Angeles

Used sponges on face of painting. Layered canvas in thick paint.

Poured Liquin in center of painting, added stripes of pure paint color to canvas, mixed with paint rags, dabbed till thick paint areas are leveled out.
Reminds me of Florida’s mysterious beauty

Shape is of Florida in part

with  matisse.artcat

Cosmos Suite: State and Grace – final – complete 2.25.2013

30×40 inches, oil on canvas by Vincent Johnson in Los Angeles (2013)

5B.artcat

Cosmos Suite: State and Grace – final – complete 2.25.2013

30×40 inches, oil on canvas by Vincent Johnson in Los Angeles (2013)

2A.artcat

 Cosmos Suite: Astral Melodies
30×40 inches, oil on canvas by Vincent Johnson in Los Angeles (2013)

used sponges on side and surface of the painting. used large brushwork. Layered canvas in paint.

Poured Liquin in between stripes of pure paint color to canvas, mixed with paint rags, dabbed till thick paint areas are leveled out. Started out with thick brush in corner to mix, abandoned this quickly.

Sensing jazz standards here – floating fields of opulent pure romantic color

Vincent Johnson received his MFA in Fine Art Painting from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California 1997 and his BFA in Painting from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He is a 2005 Creative Capital Grantee, and was selected for the Baum: An Emerging American Photographer’s Award in 2004 and for the New Museum of Contemporary Arts Aldrich Art Award in 2007 and for the Art Matters grant in 2008, and in 2009 for the Foundation for Contemporary Art Fellowship, Los Angeles. In 2010 he was named a United States Artists project artist. His work has been reviewed in ArtForum, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, Art in America, Art Slant and many other publications. His photographic works were most recently shown in the inaugural Pulse Fair Los Angeles. His most recent paintings were shown at the Beacon Arts Center in Los Angeles. His 2010 photo project – California Toilet, Filthy Light Switch, is in exhibition at Another Year in LA gallery in West Hollywood through early March 2013. His work has appeared in several venues, including The Studio Museum in Harlem (Freestyle (2001, The Philosophy of Time Travel, 2007, and The Bearden Project, 2011-2012), PS1 Museum, Queens, NY, SK Stiftung, Cologne, Germany, Santa Monica Museum of Art, LAXART, Las Cienegas Projects, Boston University Art Museum, Kellogg Museum, Cal Poly Pomona.
Below are some of the other paintings I have completed since returning to painting in the summer of 2011.
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Vincent Johnson is an artist and writer in Los Angeles

New Abstract Paintings: The Cosmos suite (2012)

Golden Dream (2012), part of the Cosmos Suite of paintings

California Toilet, Filthy Light Switch (2010) by Vincent Johnson. Archival Epson print (Private Collection, Miami, Florida). I provided this image as I realized its clear similarity to Golden Dream, which I completed a week ago in my studio in Los Angeles.

Two at Night (2012) from the Cosmos suite of paintings, Oil on canvas, 30×40 inches

Cosmos. Oil on canvas  2012 by Vincent Johnson

Cosmos Red Yellow Green. Oil on canvas 2012 by Vincent Johnson

Green God. Oil on canvas 2012 by Vincent Johnson

This new painting series is part of my ongoing exploration of painting materials and techniques from the history of painting. The works combine knowledge of painting practices of both abstract and representation paintings. The works concern themselves purely with the visual power that paintings can do through the manipulation of paint. Some of the underpaintings are allowed to dry for months; some of those are built dark to light, others light to dark. None are made in a single setting. Most are worked and reworked using studio materials. Each new series takes a different approach to the painted surface from how the paint is applied, to varying the painting mediums. This suite concerns itself with the layering of paint by building up the surface and altering and reworking the wet paint with studio tools.

Two larger paintings will be completed and photographed on Sunday, July 15, 2012 and posted here.

Vincent Johnson, Grayscale painting: The Storm (2012). Oil on canvas, 30×40 inches, created in studio in Los Angeles, California

Vincent Johnson, Grayscale painting, Snow White/White Snow (2012). Oil on canvas, 30×40 inches, created in studio in Los Angeles

Vincent Johnson is an artist and writer in Los Angeles

Vincent Johnson, Nine Grayscale Paintings, Beacon Arts Center, Los Angeles, (2001). Oil on canvas. Each panel is 20×24 inches.
photograph of silver paint on my hands in studio, Los Angeles, during the creation of Nine Grayscale paintings.
Vincent Johnson – in Los Angeles studio working on Nine Grayscale Paintings, 2011

Vincent Johnson

Los Angeles, California

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