Reviews of the Frieze New York Art Fairs

 

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ART NEWSPAPER

Is ninety the new twenty?

Several dealers at the fair are showing work by artists more than twice their own age

Sam Gilliam’s Out, 1969, at David Kordansky Gallery. The 80-year-old painter’s work is proving a draw for collectors and curators alike

New York. At this year’s edition of Frieze New York, numerous dealers are displaying the work of older artists, many of whom are gaining commercial and critical recognition for the first time. As prices continue to escalate in established areas of the market, from very young artists to post-war masters, a growing number of collectors are betting on overlooked talent.

During the fair’s VIP preview on Thursday, Lisson Gallery (B58) sold three paintings, priced between $20,000 and $100,000, by the 98-year-old artist Carmen Herrera, while Alison Jacques Gallery (A29) sold two drawings by Irma Blank, who turns 80 this year, for $15,000 each in the first few hours of the fair. Also on the first day, Sfeir-Semler Gallery (B4) sold an untitled painting by Etel Adnan, 89 this year, for €25,000. Just seven years ago, the Lebanese artist was selling similar works from her studio for $800. “The sexiest thing… right now is to rediscover an artist of at least 95 years old,” joked Chris Dercon, the director of London’s Tate Modern, at a talk last year.

In some cases, dealers are rediscovering bodies of work that were considered unfashionable when they were made but are now back in style. The Tel Aviv-based gallery Tempo Rubato (B30) sold half of its works by the Israeli artist Joav BarEl, who died in 1977 and has never been shown before in the US, for $20,000 to $30,000 each, during the fair’s preview day.

“He was interested in these very Western ideas of consumerism and mechanical production,” says the gallery’s owner, Guillaume Rouchon, of the artist’s neon Pop paintings, “but at the time, Israel was interested in expressive abstraction and post-Holocaust art.”

Some artists had other jobs and “didn’t compete in what they saw as the rat race of the art world”, says the curator and art dealer Peter Falk, who adds that he hopes to organise an art fair called “Rediscovered Masters” in either New York, Miami or Silicon Valley. Elaine Lustig Cohen (b. 1927), whose vibrant paintings are on show at the Nada fair (until 11 May), made her living as a graphic designer and rare book dealer, but her art developed a cult following among her friends, including the artist Mel Bochner. Etel Adnan, meanwhile, has painted almost daily since the 1960s but was known primarily as a writer until her work was shown at Documenta in 2012. A solo exhibition devoted to the artist, which has been organised by Hans Ulrich Obrist, the co-director of London’s Serpentine Gallery, is now on show in Doha (until 6 July). “She’s flattered by all the attention, but she would paint even if nobody was watching,” says Sfeir-Semler’s Sven Christian Schuch.

Other artists have been overlooked by the mainstream market because of “race, gender or geography”, says the art dealer Alexander Gray (D26). The painter Sam Gilliam, who is 80 and is based in Washington, DC, showed largely at galleries specialising in African-American artists until an exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery (C3) last year exposed a broader group of contemporary art collectors to his work. Since then, Gilliam’s prices have doubled and museums are taking a second look. Walking past Kordansky’s solo presentation of paintings by the artist from the 1960s, Dan Byers, a curator at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, said: “We have one in our collection from the same period, but we’ve never shown it. Now’s the time.”

For collectors priced out of the blue-chip market, these artists offer an alternative opportunity to buy a piece of history. “Much of this interest has been accelerated by dramatically rising prices and dramatically decreasing supply for the artists who have formed the central canon,” says the art adviser Allan Schwartzman. Billboard-sized works by Gilliam can be bought at Frieze for $250,000 to $350,000; paintings by his better-known peers, such as Morris Louis, are more than $1m.

Working with older artists can also be a windfall for emerging dealers at a time when “the more established galleries are going younger and younger”, says the dealer James Fuentes (C2). The blue-chip Upper East Side gallery Skarstedt, for instance, is opening an exhibition of work by the 25-year-old painter Lucien Smith (15 May-27 June), while global powerhouse David Zwirner now represents 28-year-old Oscar Murillo.

At Frieze, Fuentes nearly sold out his stand of works by the Fluxus artist Alison Knowles, aged 81, during the VIP preview, at prices ranging from $6,000 to $120,000. “We’re still seeking talent, and it often makes sense to go where others aren’t looking,” he says.

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COMPLEX

Highlights from PULSE Art Fair New York 2014

Highlights from PULSE Art Fair New York 2014

PULSE is a contemporary art fair that gets a lot of love in Miami Beach during Art Basel, but due to the proliferation of New York fairs since its inception in 2005, it may get overshadowed in the Big Apple. However, it shouldn’t, because it continually provides a fresh take on today’s art scene with galleries who don’t always get the platform to share on such a wide level.

Enjoy our brief walk-through of highlights at the fair this year and visit it today in New York through 7 p.m. at the Metropolitan Pavilion.

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Entering the fair, you encounter Andy Yoder‘s Early One Morning, a PULSE Project presented by Winkleman Gallery. Made of 300,000 match sticks and weighing in at 200 lbs., it’s named after an earlier piece by the late Anthony Caro and references the devastation of Hurricane Sandy.

Nearby are the works of Moroccan artist Hassan Hajjaj , who takes traditional, vibrant portraits of his creative friends and the “Kesh Angels,” who are a group of female bikers. He often frames or creates entire works out of found materials and products found in localized regions of the Middle East. This year, Hajjah is a PULSE Prize finalist with the Gusford Gallery.

Around the corner, there’s a fascinating work by Arlés del Rio called Nearness, which was brought by Times Square Arts and the Cuban Artists Fund.

Gallery Joe hosts a work by Mia Rosenthal titled iPad, which is actually ink, gouache, and graphite on paper (including the cord at the bottom). It’s a tongue-in-cheek reduction of an interface that we hardly think twice about anymore.

Pavel Acosta‘s multiple pieces at Zadok Gallery, including María Teresa, Infanta of Spain, after Diego Velazquez, (Stolen from the Met), are brilliant mosaic-style works made out of paint chips (because originally, the artist had very limited access to materials). The attention to detail in each is mesmerizing.

Michael Scoggins‘ work may be on view at lots of art fairs, but this singular piece is comic relief, if nothing else. Brought by Freight+Volume, Decorative Piece (one in violet) costs $6,000 and just might be designed to perfectly fit over your fucking couch.

Eric Firestone Gallery brought multiple impressive works by BÄST, whose popularity continues to grow since his recent Marc Jacobs collaboration. Snoopy and Box Top are two of the most exciting ones the gallery brought, which appear alongside photographs by Tseng Kwong Chi and Henry Chalfant of Basquiat, Haring, and graffitied subway cars.

On a crowded wall of works across the way, one simply cannot miss Shawn HuckinsUlysses S. Grant: Hashtag Um at Keeler & Co. We did a Portfolio Review with him earlier this year.

Walk a little further and find Jessica Lichtenstein‘s Winter (Four Seasons Series at Gallery Nine5. Look closer and see the multiplied collage of computer generated nude girls in an orgy-like setting.

Lisay Levy‘s Self Portrait has been at PULSE previously, but it’s no less striking or fun to see again. Schroeder Romero Editions brought the piece, which is from an edition of 50, and costs $150.

Coburn Projects has brought all RETNA this year, and the arrangement alone was worth spending time pondering the language he’s created in his works.

Planking may no longer be a trend (lest we forget, it was referenced in Watch the Throne‘s “Gotta Have It”), but Anibal Vallejo may be bringing it back? Her Plank after Freud multi-panel piece has an astronaut in various, well-colored moments of planking.

Shantell Martin‘s YOU ARE YOU booth is a Haring-like journey into the mind of a very promising, rising young artist whose drawing has no limits. Having recently been commissioned to paint the Viacom office, she has a solo show at MOCADA in New York right now and is also in a major group show at Brooklyn Museum later this year. She is signing prints for $20 and live-drawing in the booth.

Next door, Kai Schaefer‘s stunning, large photograph of a Licensed to Ill record being played feels like a proper homage to the intricacies of analog music…and an awesome album, too.

There may be no better way to end one’s time at PULSE than with Paco Pomet‘s history-meets-comic-books-and-destruction pieces at My Name’s Lolita Art.

Until next PULSE…

ARTSPACE

Art Market

Highlights From NADA New York 2014

By Artspace Editors

May 10, 2014

Highlights From NADA New York 2014

Sara Cwynar’s Toucan In Nature (Post-It Notes), 2013

SARA CWYNAR at Cooper Cole

Sara Cwynar’s solo booth with Toronto-based gallery Cooper Cole is a victory lap for the artist after her recent solo show at Chelsea’s Foxy Production, which was reviewed very favorably in the New York Times by Roberta Smith. Cwynar is a graphic artist by day, and fine artist by night, and its shows; her works flex their power to expand and flatten space in layers of built-up and re-photographed collaged images.

MATTHEW BRANDT at M+B Los Angeles

brandt

Matthew Brandt has carved out a niche for himself in the sub-genre of what might be called “process photography.” He uses unconventional materials in traditional photographic techniques to produce unique photographic prints with a conceptual twist; for example his “dust” series, which uses collected dust and adhesive in place of the usual photographic chemicals to print delicate, gossamer images; or his photographs of lakes and rivers that are developed in liquid collected from the bodies of water themselves. In a two-person booth with Jesse Stecklow, M+B is showing Brand’t new series of fragile, subtle dust photos.

DAVE HARDY at Regina Rex

hardy
Hardy’s sculptures are shown in Regina Rex‘s group booth alongside works by John Dilg, Kristen Jensen, Elisabeth Kley, Anna Mayer, Sarah Peters, Nicholas Pilato, and Hayal Pozanti. His minimalist found-object assemblages are made from cast-off materials like liner foam, sheets of glass, and squares of carpet. They’re gravity-defying—sometimes frighteningly so (especially in the hustle and bustle of a fair)—and show an economy of means that highlights Hardy’s acumen as a sculptor.

SUMMER WHEAT at Samsøn Projects

wheat

In her own words, Summer Wheat makes artworks—one of which is currently included in the show “Expanding the Field of Painting” at Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Arts—that are “ugly but beautiful.” Through juxtapositions of texture, color, and sensibility, they’re also bold and gripping; particularly her paintings, which show the fecundity of unrestrained mark-making. Our favorties are her ‘tapestries,’ made by layering aluminum mesh with acrylic paint.

XAVIERA SIMMONS at David Castillo Gallery

simmons

Working in photography, performance, sound, sculpture, video, and installation, Xaviera Simmons (pronounced zy-VEER-ee-a) explores history, experience, and memory through abstraction. Working in “cycles” of photography, performance, and various other media, her work is in constant rotation. At NADA, Simmons is showing a series of works that tackle “cognitive capitalism” in quasi-portait photographs that point to the self’s design through external aesthetic means, as well as text-based black-and-white paintings that signal a new direction in her ever-evolving ouevre.

DAVID X. LEVINE at Steven Zevitas Gallery

levine

David X. Levine works in colored pencil on paper, sometimes layered with collage, in super-large scale, creating pieces that area formally reminiscent of Sol LeWitt‘s well-known wall drawings. Levine has been working in New York for close to 20 years, but it’s only recently that Brooklyn-based gallery Knowmoregames has been promoting his work. The fair will surely be an eye-opener for those not already familiar with his work.

LENA HENKE at Real Fine Arts

henke

We’re not sure what exactly to call Lena Henke‘s printed-on boxes of transparent plastic—in the traditional of Donald Judd‘s “specific objects,” they hang on the wall but are clearly sculptural, and they use photographic images, but in abstracted forms. Based on her recent installation at MOCA North Miami last year, it’s clear that Henke likes making works that are in proximity to, but don’t quite fit, standard notions of objecthood. At a fair where 90 percent of the work is two-dimensional, these clearly stood out.

DOUGLAS MELINI at Eleven Rivington

melini

Speaking of painting—if you’re going to go the two-dimensional route, consider Douglas Melini‘s example. His tidy canvases are layered with tape, then piled on with thick oil paint; he also hand-paints his frames. The color palette is swamp-monster green, which gives Melini’s works a pleasurably vegetal quality.

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FORBES

Style & Design 5/10/2014 @ 9:38PM 71 views

Frieze Art Fair VIP Preview Attracts Serious Collectors, Celebrities

Frieze New York has established itself as an international destination for serious collectors. The Frieze Art Fair is being held on Randall’s Island for a third consecutive year, in a clean, white, spacious tent, with great buzz and enthusiasm. Thursday’s VIP opening brought a mix of celebrities, collectors and advisers. Leonardo Di Caprio, Uma Thurman, Michael Mayer and Marc Jacobs joined Jessica Seinfeld, Renee Rockefeller, Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, Yvonne Force Villareal and Beth De Woody in their quests for the perfect piece(s). Mark Ruffalo and Gavin Brown cooked and served anti-fracking sausages. But the real star, of course, was the work.

“Frieze New York feels like it’s been established longer than three years,” said international art dealer Thaddaeus Ropac. “There is a strong American and European audience this year. We know everybody, it’s great to feel the energy.”

Many pieces in Ropac’s gallery had already been purchased.

Michael Mayer, Uma Thurman Photo J. Grassi / Patrick McMullan

“We sold well,” Ropac continued, “but this we almost did beforehand, because today the art market is so strong and the collectors want to know everything we’re bringing before they arrive. We happily give this information, and the sales are kind of done before we start the fair. But the energy is very important. People are eager to come here, and we feel it. I’m amazed how many Europeans are here. Frieze New York has become one of the top fairs in the world. Besides discovering emerging artists, there have been rediscoveries of forgotten artists. I even bought some myself.”

Art dealer and curator Jeffrey Deitch was somewhat distracted by the social aspect of the preview, but still managed to spot some favorite pieces.

“I’m a big fan of Roberto Cuoghi whose show just opened at the New Museum last night. there’s a superb conceptual self portrait of his at Massimo de Carlo; I was very enthusiastic about that, and about Sam Gilliam’s astonishing paintings from the late sixties at David Kordansky,” said Deitch.

“The first day it’s just as much about saying hello to friends as it is seeing the art. Today I’m focusing on people; tomorrow I’ll come back and focus on the art.”

Jessica Seinfeld  Photo J. Grassi / PatrickMcMullan

Paul Kasmin Gallery  Photo J. Grassi / Patrick McMullan

WALL STREET JOURNAL

4:29 pm ET
May 9, 2014

Art

Five Stand-Outs From the Frieze Art Fair

At Frieze, art installations include a hotel that isn’t really a hotel, a ferry that isn’t really a ferry and a soccer field that isn’t really a soccer field. And one other thing: more than 190 booths of art. The contemporary art fair, which opened Friday and runs through Monday on Randall’s Island in New York, grabbed attention with its brassy headliners: Al’s Grand Hotel, a restaging of a 1971 project by artist Allen Ruppersberg with two working guest rooms; New York artist Marie Lorenz’s salvaged rowboat shuttling visitors around the harbor, and Argentine artist Eduardo Basualdo’s soccer field with glass-filled goals. Beyond the hoopla over the installations, there is the actual business of selling art, with more than 1,000 artists at galleries from 28 countries. Here, five stand-outs from the booths:

MARINA ABRAMOVIC

Carrying the Skeleton, 2008

Marina Abramovic Archives/Sean Kelly, NY

The artist created this photograph of herself dragging a skeleton custom made for her body during a 2008 studio performance, and it has since become one of her most famous images. The New York-based Sean Kelly Gallery priced the picture, one of an edition of nine, from about $165,000 to $206,000.

LIU WEI

Library II-II, 2013

Liu Wei/Lehmann Maupin, NY/Hong Kong

The Chinese artist takes books from second-hand markets in Beijing, compresses them and carves them into haunting cityscapes—an allegory for the lost memories of a fast-developing city. The work, priced at $295,000, takes up about half the booth for Lehmann Maupin gallery.

HAUSER & WIRTH’S HIGH-CONCEPT BOOTH

The Head of W.P., 2014

© Paul McCarthy/Hauser & Wirth

Curator Gianni Jetzer tries to evoke the human heart by dividing the gallery’s space into two chambers with artworks moving circulation-like from blue to red—from a huge detached head of Snow White by the artist Paul McCarthy in bright blue to Louise Bourgeois’s 36 red gouaches featuring babies in a womb.

JOAN JONAS

Snake Drawing I, performance, The Shape, The Scent, The Feel of Things, 2005

Joan Jonas/Wilkinson Gallery

Art-world insiders are seeking out this conceptual artist, who will represent the U.S. at the 2015 Venice Biennale. London’s Wilkinson Gallery has dedicated its entire booth to Jonas, with prints from her 1969 mirror performances and snake drawings like this one from 2005, priced at $65,000.

SHIMABAKU

Photograph wearing rain boots, 2014

Shimabuku/Galerie Wien Lukatsch, Berlin; Photo: Valentina Jager

The Japanese artist—who has created an art exhibition for monkeys and a movie about an octopus on a trip to a fish market—riffs on the self-portrait. The image of the sea of Okinawa near his father’s childhood home is paired with rain boots, priced at around $11,700 from Berlin’s Galerie Wien Lukatsch.

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ART NEWSPAPER

Screaming for attention

Pulse art fair may not have found its voice, but it’s not keeping its mouth shut

Background 2, 2013, Marko Tadic (Ikon Arts Foundation)

Pulse is not exactly an uneven art fair. For the most part, its greatest peaks are not too far and above its lowest valleys, some of which truly plunge. The multi-artist booths are often full of paintings, photos or light installations that barely speak to one another, or to the rest of the art on view throughout. Eclectic and aesthetically scattered, this fair embodies the problems that accompany pluralism. In an art world that seemingly knows no bounds, which has colonised large swaths of New York real estate for an entire week, there is certainly room enough for this event. But organisers are still figuring out what to do with their allotted space. More than anything, this is a show that is still finding its voice.

There is a sustained amount of aesthetic shouting, and it begins early on. At the front entrance of the fair, the main doors are covered in an ugly abstract pattern of purple, green, orange and yellow stripes, and the weakest work inside complies with the adopted colour scheme, as if it were screaming for attention. Appropriately, the best art is the most tranquil. At the stand for the Ikon Arts Foundation, a group of small collages by the Croatian artist Marko Tadic elbows practically everything else aside, even though these hushed works are still lifes. One interior, Background 2, 2013, depicts a room with a table, a painting, and four chairs, but no people. It’s a silent space, and the intimate scale of the work—15 inches by 10 inches—echoes the lack of noise. Tadic’s work is on the right track. Getting to the end of a busy week for the New York art world, it’s time for some peace and quiet.

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NYTIMES

 

Credit Karsten Moran for The New York Times

 

The amazing spectacle that is Frieze New York is up and running on Randalls Island. With more than 190 contemporary art dealers from around the world inhabiting a temporary, quarter-mile-long white tent, it’s a dumbfounding display of human creative industry. Reasoning that in the time allowed, no one reviewer could hope to achieve a comprehensive overview of all there is to see, we both went to look and report. What follows is a sampler of things that caught our attention.

GLADSTONE GALLERY (Booth B6) This museum-worthy show includes more than 200 small drawings from the painter Carroll Dunham’s archives. Dating from 1979 to 2014, they are presented on three walls in grid formation chronologically. Like pages from a personal diary, they track the evolution of Mr. Dunham’s antic imagination. From sketches of blobby, surrealistic forms to pictures of battling, cartoony male and female characters to images of naked, hairy wild women and men in edenic scenes, these irrepressibly lively, cheerfully vulgar drawings suggest a psychoanalytic pilgrim’s progress. (K. J.)

GAVIN BROWN (B38) This booth is filled by Rirkrit Tiravanija’s installation “Freedom can not be simulated.” It consists of about a dozen plywood walls arranged in parallel about a foot and a half apart. On one side of each wall hangs a large black canvas covered with squiggly chalk lines that you can only see fully by squeezing in between the walls. The first canvas in the series has the title drawn on it in big block letters. The installation offers itself as a pointedly coercive metaphor about the eternally necessary tension between freedom and constraint. (K. J.)

ANDREW KREPS (B54) Goshka Macuga’s “Of what is, that it is; of what is not, that it is not 2” is a giant black-and-white tapestry made on looms in Flanders. Over 10 feet high and 36 feet wide, it presents a panoramic scene copied from a photoshopped collage representing an incongruous gathering of art world luminaries and political protesters at Documenta 13, an exhibition in Germany in 2012. Ms. Macuga’s work pictures the moral and political contradictions of contemporary art and its social support system as powerfully as anything at the fair. (K. J.)

MARIANNE BOESKY (A30) This gallery offers “Revolution,” a sculpture by Roxy Paine that expresses a more ambiguous political sentiment. A chain saw with a bullhorn attached, both realistically rendered in wood, it’s a piece of impressive craftsmanship and a surrealistic dream image of political violence. (K. J.)

RATIO 3 (C56) For technical magic, nothing beats Takeshi Murato’s “Melter 3-D.” In a room lit by flickering strobes, a revolving, beachball-size sphere seems made of mercury. A hypnotic wonder, it appears to be constantly melting into flowing ripples. (K. J.)

303 GALLERY (B61)Many works at the fair meditate on art and the artist. Rodney Graham’s big, light-box-mounted phototransparency “The Pipe Cleaner Artist, Amalfi, ’61”, at 303, depicts Mr. Graham in a lovely Mediterranean studio, leisurely making sculptures from white pipe cleaners. With a sweetly comical spirit, it spoofs a kitschy romance of bohemian avant-gardism. (K. J.)

CROY NIELSEN (C1) In a tall, plexiglass display case here is a simple but philosophically resonant assemblage by Benoît Maire. Titled “Weapon,” it consists of a three-sided ruler attached to a rock by a wrist watch’s metal bracelet. It’s about rationalizing the irrational, an enduring task for art. (K. J.)

GALERIE LELONG (B12) A neon sign by Alfredo Jaar that reads “Teach Us to Outgrow Our Madness” is a fine prayer for what art might do for our troubled times. (K. J.)

One thing this fair allows you to do is to sample in one location what critics see around the city and the world. This includes emerging artists and historical shows. You’ll find many of them under a special designation, Frieze Focus, indicating galleries founded in or after 2003, and in Frame, a section that features solo presentations by galleries under eight years old.

SIMONE SUBAL (B21) This Bowery gallery is showing a Florian Meisenberg installation that fits in perfectly at an art fair because it takes its cue from another “nonspace”: the airport, with its spectacle of architecture, patterns, moving people and digital screens. It includes a video with excerpts from the film “Lolita” and an episode of “The Simpsons” in which Homer becomes a lauded outsider artist. (M. S.)

LAUREL GITLEN (B28) This gallery offers Allyson Vieira’s “Meander,” a structure made of metal building studs that uses the ancient meander pattern (also found on classic New York coffee cups) as its floor plan and suggests how certain graphic patterns are recycled throughout various empires. (MS)

CARLOS/ISHIKAWA (B34) This London gallery is showing Richard Sides’s collagelike assemblages, made from a personal archive of what he calls “good trash” collected outside his studio. (M. S.)

MISAKO & ROSEN (B20) This Tokyo-based gallery has objects by Kazuyuki Takezaki, who was inspired by the great ukiyo-e printmaker Hiroshige to recreate “landscapes” that sometimes take the form of sculptures, and include materials like a braided rug. (M. S.)

LE GUERN (A2) Dominating the space in this Warsaw gallery’s booth is a solo presentation of the Brooklyn artist C. T. Jasper, a tent made from around 160 sheepskins. (Get it? a tent within the big tent of Frieze). Inside the tent is a remix of the Polish director Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s 1966 film “Faraon (Pharaoh)” — but with all the human figures digitally removed from the film. (M. S.)

Gallerists are getting good at organizing historical shows, and several at Frieze are standouts.

JAMES FUENTES (C2) This Delancey Street gallery offers a presentation of the Fluxus artist Alison Knowles, best known for performance events like “Make a Salad” (1962). Here you can see objects made by Ms. Knowles from the ’70s to the present. If you hear a loud cascading sound at the south end of the fair, it is someone flipping over her “Red Bean Turner,” which is like an opaque hourglass filled with dried beans. (M. S.)

THE BOX (C14) This Los Angeles gallery has a great roundup of work by NO!Art, a group founded in 1959 that was distinctly (paradoxically, for this setting) anti-commercial. Collages and silk-screens by Boris Lurie, Stanley Fisher and Sam Goodman look incredibly prescient — like Mr. Lurie’s painting “Sold.” (M. S.)

GREGOR PODNAR (A22) In a smaller historical presentation you can see 1970s photographs and Conceptual drawings by two Gorans: Goran Trbuljak and Goran Petercol, Croatian artists who were routinely mistaken for each other in their local Zagreb art scene because of their first names. (M. S.)

PROJECTS Just outside the tent, the Projects section includes the Czech artist Eva Kotatkova‘s “Architecture of Sleep,” an outdoor installation with performers resting on platforms (and who should not be disturbed). Marie Lorenz, who works on New York’s waterways, is offering rides in a rowboat made with salvaged materials. Unfortunately, her “Randalls Island Tide Ferry” doesn’t offer service to or from the fair, but it accomplishes what most art tries to do: It transports you. (M. S.)

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BLOOMBERG

Frieze Woos Billionaires With $375 Sleepovers, Pricey Art

By Katya Kazakina and Mary Romano May 7, 2014 9:00 PM PT

Source: Graham Carlow, Frieze

Visitors inside the Frieze Art Fair in New York in 2012.

Source: Naho Kubota, Frieze

A white serpentine-tent houses 190 contemporary-art galleries from 28 countries.

Source: Carroll Dunham and Gladstone Gallery

New York’s Gladstone Gallery will show more than 200 drawings by Carroll Dunham created between 1979 and 1014.

Source: David Zwirner

Untitled (Menziken 88-84), 1988 box by artist Donald Judd made in anodized aluminum clear with red and chartreuse Plexiglas.

Source: Shane Campbell Gallery

Cast bronze champagne corkscrew by emerging artist Chris Bradley.

Inside the Frieze Art Fair on New York’s Randall’s Island, there’s a hotel with two beds so guests can sleep among the artworks for as much as $375 a night.

A security guard will keep tabs on the slumber party to make sure no one is wandering around the white serpentine-tent housing 190 contemporary-art galleries from 28 countries. They can hang out in this art installation and watch hotel-themed films such as “Grand Hotel,” the 1932 Greta Garbo classic. Breakfast and dinner will be served.

The art world elite including billionaire collectors Eli Broad and Alice Walton are expected to converge today on the fair, a short car or ferry ride from Manhattan. Now in its third year, Frieze, which runs through May 12, is cementing its role in New York as a hip marketplace for emerging and blue-chip art.

Wealthy collectors can grab a $2,000 cast bronze champagne corkscrew by emerging artist Chris Bradley or drop $650,000 on a Donald Judd minimalist box. Frieze also commissioned surprising art projects like the sleepovers and organizing brainy talks, which this year will include a conversation between members of Russian punk band Pussy Riot and New Yorker editor-in-chief David Remnick.

“I always keep in mind it’s an art fair,” said Cecilia Alemani, who coordinated Frieze Projects, the site-specific artworks commissioned for the fair such as the “Al’s Grand Hotel.” “It’s not just collectors. People can listen to great talks or a concert or just enjoy an afternoon on the lawn.”

Auctions, Fairs

The fair coincides with two weeks of semi-annual auctions in New York, which are expected to sell as much as $2.3 billion of art. It also anchors at least eight other art fairs including Pulse, New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA) and mini-fairs Seven and Salon Zurcher.

Frieze, which started in 2003 in London, where it will hold its next edition in October, is considered one of the world’s three most important contemporary-art fairs, along with Art Basel in Switzerland in June and Art Basel Miami Beach in December.

“Most collectors believe it’s a must-see event,” said Wendy Cromwell, director of New York-based art advisory firm Cromwell Art LLC. “They have a really nice high-low strategy, with a good representation of high-end art and emerging art. It’s taken them three years to get to this point.”

Solo Shows

More than 20 galleries are dedicating their booths to solo artist presentations, ranging from American veteran Ed Ruscha at Gagosian gallery to emerging Brit Eddie Peake at Lorcan O’Neill.

New York’s Gladstone Gallery will show more than 200 drawings by Carroll Dunham created between 1979 and 2014. David Kordansky Gallery from Los Angeles is showing Sam Gilliam’s beveled-edge paintings from the 1960s and 1970s.

“For us, it’s a prime arena to meet new collectors and curators,” said Eric Ruschman, manager of Chicago-based Shane Campbell Gallery, a third-time participant. “Especially people who are not able to come to Chicago and see the art in person.”

The hotel installation is a restaging of Allen Ruppersberg’s project in 1971 in Los Angeles, in which he converted a Craftsman house in Hollywood for six weeks into a fully functioning hotel with seven rooms and a performance and party space. The Frieze hotel is a collaboration between Ruppersberg and the Los Angeles project space Public Fiction. It comprises three booths: two rooms, each with a queen-size bed, and a lobby.

Row Boat

Those in need of a break from art can peruse other site specific projects. New York artist Marie Lorenz will take passengers around the harbor for about 20 minutes in a row boat built from salvaged materials. Participants will wear life jackets and will be expected to do some rowing.

Lorenz offers “a unique perspective on the city we love,” said Alemani, who has taken one of the artist’s rides. “It’s astonishing how you feel immersed in nature and yet you can see the Manhattan skyline. It was amazing. You feel really tiny and the boat is tiny.”

Among the trendy restaurants serving food at the fair are Marlow & Sons, from Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood, and Italian eatery Frankies Spuntino. Mission Cantina, the Mexican restaurant on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, will offer burritos and Roberta’s, the Italian restaurant housed in a converted Brooklyn garage, will serve pizza.

Deutsche Bank AG (DBK) is the lead sponsor of Frieze in New York and London. Its foundation funds and develops the fair’s educational programs. High school students from the South Bronx and East Harlem will tour the fair; one group working with the Bronx River Art Center will create a digital guide.

“Our hope is to give broad access to school children of all ages to the various arts and culture programs that we sponsor,” Jacques Brand, chief executive officer of Deutsche Bank’s North American unit and chairman of the Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation, said in an interview.

Frieze is open to VIPs today by invitation and to the public May 9 through May 12. http://www.friezenewyork.com.

===

NYC X DESIGN

Frieze New York, May 9-12, 2014

May 9 / 11:00 am–7:00 pm

Organized by: Frieze New York
This event happens from May 9, 2014 to May 12, 2014
Choose a different date

This event is: Public
Admission Fee: From $10 plus fees
Opening Party Date and Time: Private View, Thursday May 8
Sponsored By: Deutsche Bank

About the event:

Frieze New York, May 9-12, Randall’s Island Park

‘Frieze Art Fair electrifies New York’ The Wall Street Journal
‘Ground-breaking’ Financial Times

Visit Frieze New York and take part in the contemporary art event of the year.

Housed in a distinct serpentine structure overlooking the East River, the fair brings together the most dynamic and forward-thinking galleries, both local and international, working today.

In addition to being able to see and buy art by over 1,000 of the world’s leading artists, you can experience the fair’s critically acclaimed Projects, Talks, Sounds and Education programs.

The fair also includes Frame, a section dedicated to solo artist presentations by emerging galleries and Focus, which features artworks specially conceived for Frieze New York.

For the first time this year, a thousand tickets priced at $10 are available for 17-25 year-olds or full-time students with valid ID, visiting the fair on Monday, May 12. Limited offer. Booking fees apply.

Buy your tickets now at friezenewyork.com

==

HYPERALLERGIC

Galleries

On the Floor at Frieze New York 2014

Frieze New York 2014 (all photos by the author for Hyperallergic)

Some dating wisdom has it that the third date is make or break, the one when you decide whether or not to move forward. This is the third year of the Frieze New York art fair, and I’m just not sure I see us having a future together.

The quintessential Frieze New York booth (click to enlarge)

Last year I was charmed by the performances and booze, but this year the booths at Frieze feel stale. It’s a fair, so that’s not really a problem — shiny work, as well as purposefully ugly and purposefully weird work abounds, and collectors will buy much of it — but for those holding out hope for a flash of experience, an artwork that will stop you in your tracks … don’t. The tent still feels airy and looks nice. The food is still delicious and overpriced. Randalls Island is still a lovely place to visit, even in the rain. Yet Gagosian Gallery still shows Ed Ruscha. David Zwirner brought Yayoi Kusama. Andrea Rosen Gallery set up a small, completely uninspired Ryan Trecartin installation, and White Cube has a new diorama featuring crucified Ronald McDonalds by Jake and Dinos Chapman. Frieze New York feels nothing if not rehearsed. And why not? Art fairs basically happen year-round at this point. Dealers know what works. Little effort required. Sucks for the rest of us.

Jake and Dinos Chapman, "Wheel of misfortune" (2014), at White Cube

Still, I can’t help but wish that someone somewhere had proposed something even just slightly outside the art fair box, and that someone else somewhere had said “yes.” As it stands, the closest thing to that at Frieze is a re-creation of a past work, Allen Rupersberg’s “Al’s Grand Hotel” from 1971, for which the artist turned a two-story house into a hotel and performance space. As part of Frieze Projects, and in collaboration with Los Angeles project space Public Fiction, Rupersberg has restaged “Al’s Grand Hotel” inside Frieze. It features a cozy chic lobby with a bar and welcome desk, where you can reserve a room for the night starting at $350. Be careful which room you choose, though: one is a bridal suite that includes flowers on the bed and presents on the table; the other is the Jesus Room and features an enormous wooden cross blocking the bed. “You’re staying here … in that room?” one woman asked another as I was standing nearby. The future occupant — unassuming, middle-aged, dark gray hair — smiled cheerily.

The Jesus Room in Allen Rupersberg's "Al's Grand Hotel (1971) with Public Fiction (2014)"

Sonia Gomes, "Untitled," from 'Torção' series (2014), sewing, binding, different fabric on wire, 100 x 60 x 40 cm (click to enlarge)

Even within the bounds of traditional gallery booths, it’s possible to do something new: consider this year’s Armory Show, which presented a surprising exhibit of art from China and its first-ever gallery from Saudi Arabia. Frieze 2014, on the other hand, is painfully Western-centric, with a welcome sprinkling of participants from South and Central America and Asia. It was almost a uniform truth this afternoon that the art I found most intriguing was being shown by galleries I don’t know well, if at all, including: visionary collages from the 1960s and ’70s by Kikuji Yamashita and Hiroshi Katsuragawa at greengrassi; an oversized carpet that looks like a messy painting out of Bushwick by Steinar Haga Kristensen at Johan Berggren Gallery; a challenging new assemblage sculpture by Abraham Cruzvillegas at Galerie Chantal Crousel; part of a conceptual installation focused on the hands of figures in Old Master paintings by Iñaki Bonillas at ProjecteSD; and sewn fabric sculpture contraptions by Sonia Gomes at Mendes Wood DM.

The Frame section, devoted to galleries established fewer than eight years ago, also contained some standouts, due in part to that relative newness and to the required solo-presentation format, which at a fair offers a cherished moment of possible concentration. (As a side note, Derek Eller Gallery’s solo presentation of Karl Wirsum, not in Frame, is excellent.) There, I was drawn to Lena Henke’s dissonant mix of materials, the simultaneous fluidity and rigidity of her sculptures shown by Real Fine Arts, as well as Kazuyuki Takezaki’s scrambled landscapes that look both handmade and digital at Misako & Rosen. Nearby, Ariel Reichman constructed a literal landscape, an oasis of green amid the desert of white that functioned as PSM gallery’s booth.

Ariel Reichman's garden installation at PSM

But white wins out at the end of the day; Frieze New York feels more than ever like what it quite simply is: a very pretty trading floor. Not everyone is making out well, though: the kids working the coat check have a jar out asking for tips.

Tip jar for the coat check workers

Sculpture by Lena Henke at Real Fine Arts

Sculpture by Kazuyuki Takezaki at Misako & Rosen

Three works by Karl Wirsum at Derek Eller Gallery

People resting by Koki Tanaka's Frieze Project

Work by Kikuji Yamashita at greengrassi

Steinar Haga Kristensen's carpet painting at Johan Berggren Gallery

Iñaki Bonillas's installation at ProjecteSD

The lobby of "Al's Grand Hotel"

Installation view, Frieze New York

Frieze New York 2014 continues on Randalls Island through May 12.

ART NET NEWS

Frieze New York Fumbles

Benjamin Sutton, Friday, May 9, 2014

Share

frieze-ny-2014-01

For Frieze New York, the third time is most certainly not the charm. The fair’s 2014 outing drew press and VIPs to Randall’s Island on Thursday, with the aisles of the vast Frieze Tent becoming jam-packed by the end of the day, but the booths, too, have succumbed to overcrowding. Since launching in 2012 Frieze New York’s greatest strengths have been its roomy, sparsely hung booths—tempering the exhaustion borne of navigating such mega-fairs—and the relative eclecticism ensured by the very international makeup of its exhibitors. But all that is starting to change, and not for the best.

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The 192 galleries involved in the fair’s 2014 edition are increasingly maximizing their wall space with ever-more homogenous works. The result is the flimsiest Frieze New York to date. The epitome of this comes at a major juncture near the fair’s south end, where competing mega-dealers Larry Gagosian and David Zwirner have adjacent booths; The former’s is lined with ho-hum Ed Ruscha text paintings, the latter packed with selections from the gallery’s roster. Zwirner easily wins the intersection, thanks in no small part to defecting Gagosian artist Yayoi Kusama’s giant polka dot-covered pumpkin sculpture, but the dueling dealers’ uninspired presentations mean we all lose. Luckily, a smattering of local galleries and others from cities outside the art world’s traditional axis of power are keeping things interesting with strong presentations of works by little-known artists and booth-filling installations.

frieze-ny-2014-02

Foremost among these is the São Paulo gallery Vermelho, which has given over most of its booth to a pair of giant paintings on unstretched canvas by Dora Longo Bahia. One features a green-hued replica of Pablo Picasso’s Guernica splashed with a huge streak of blood-red paint, while the other shows a matching emerald-tinted scene of death and grief in which all the figures have been de-Cubist-ified and rendered more figuratively. It’s one of surprisingly few works at the fair overtly engaging with art history.

frieze-ny-2014-03

Which isn’t to say that there aren’t other works on view memorializing contemporary art—after all, one of this year’s Frieze Projects is a re-staging of Allen Rupersberg’s 1971 hotel. Drawing on the more immediate past, New York gallery Andrew Kreps has brought one of two tapestries that Goshka Macuga produced for Documenta 13. The 38-foot-long piece shows the artist receiving the Arnold Bode Prize in Kassel in 2011 before a bevvy of art world power players—many of whom will no doubt be setting sail for Randall’s Island this week. Occupy Wall Street protestors seem to be crashing the award ceremony in Macuga’s cinematic, black-and-white scene, lending a little tension to the otherwise overly insider-y mega-quilt, which is on reserve and priced at $230,000.

frieze-ny-2014-07

In a far more compelling historical presentation, New York’s Derek Eller Gallery has devoted its booth to Chicago Imagist Karl Wirsum, whose wild, sci-fi figures are an absolute delight. His three stylized mannequins—Mary O’Net, Chris Teen, and Nurse Worse (all 1972)—provide a nice contrast to the Isa Genzken mannequin sculptures on view a couple aisles over in the Hauser & Wirth booth.

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Similarly conspicuous for its retro-futurist feel is the booth of Warsaw-based art space Galeria Le Guern, which contains an irregularly shaped video pavilion cloaked in lambswool by C.T. Jasper. The installation, and the video playing therein—an abstraction of Polish filmmaker Jerzy Kawalerowicz’s feature film Pharaoh (1966) in which all the human figures have been edited out—is one of the few offerings at this year’s Frieze New York that is genuinely transporting. The entire installation, titled Sunset of the Pharaohs (2014) is available for a relatively affordable $69,000.

frieze-ny-2014-09

It’s a testament to how bland this year’s offerings at Frieze New York are that the installation by Cuban artist Wilfredo Prieto in Madrid- and Barcelona-based gallery Noguera Blanchard‘s booth stands out. Amid all the over-stuffed booths, the artist’s simple installation of a suspended shark cage—a sculptural readymade named Shark Tank (2012) that the artist purchased from a treasure-hunting company—stands out for its sparseness. The Damien Hirst-like sculpture is on sale for $85,000.

frieze-ny-2014-11

A similarly irreverent installation can be found in Copenhagen-based Galleri Nicolai Wallner‘s booth, where Jonathan Monk’s All the Possible Combinations of Eight Legs Kicking (One at a Time) (2013) has four pairs of mannequin legs, each clad in a different color of tights, kicking in sequence until every possible suite of kicks has been enacted. With the full range of possibilities playing out over 177 hours, the $110,000 installation (available in an edition of two) promises plenty of entertainment for your money.

frieze-ny-2014-12

A conspicuous number of dealers filled their Frieze New York booths with the same exact sets of artists as last year, giving the whole fair the feel of reheated leftovers. But this strategy paid off for the Warsaw-based Foksal Gallery Foundation, which once again wowed with strange and beautiful paintings by Jakub Julian Ziólkowski, among others. Sadly, though, this was the exception to the rule, reinforcing the overwhelming sense of staleness at Frieze New York 2014.

The 2014 edition of Frieze New York continues on Randall’s Island through May 12.

frieze-ny-2014-05

==

I.D. MAGAZINE

Top Five Things to Eat at Frieze NY 2014

The Frieze Art Fair has hit New York! While the fair officially opens to the public tomorrow, international collectors, gallerists and culture-seekers have descended upon the city for the incredible invasion of exhibitions and events that make up Frieze week. Our diary is stacked with un-missable events and projects, from David Remnick’s talk with Pussy Riot on Friday, to Naama Tsabar’s music festival, to a reprisal of Allen Ruppersberg’s Al’s Grand Hotel. As we gear up for a full weekend of art, we can’t help but let our minds wander to the A+ line-up of restaurants, snack bars and food trucks that will grace Randall’s Island for fair-goers. Below, a highly subjective list of the top five dishes that we shall be Instagramming, for your exclusive food-spiration.

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  • Mission Cantina Burritos

    Danny Bowien’s Cali-style burritos are rare delicacies in NY. Takeout-only from the Lower East Side location, their pan-seared  “super burrito” confections will be available at the fair. Much has been said about Bowien’s considered technique, which includes pre-frying the handmade tortillas and omitting the rice. We will be killing two birds with one burrito by snacking on this puppy whilst riding Marie Lorenz’s ‘Tide and Current Taxi’ boat around the island.Image Courtesy of T. Tseng

    Courtesy of T. Tseng
  • Omakase Menu at Furanku

    When we called Frankie’s Spuntino restaurant this morning toinquire about the menu atFuranku, the team’s new sushi concept pop-up for the fair, the guy who answered was understandably sceptical. “I don’t think so. We’re an Italian restaurant.” While spaghetti and sushi are not typicallysympatico, Frank F. and Frank C. will be debuting their Japanese outpost to a good deal of anticipation tomorrow. Book now for the $69omakase menu (“omakase” is derived from the Japanese word for “to trust”) at the 50 seat bar.Image courtesy of Frankies Spuntino 

    Courtesy of Frankies Spuntino
  • Coolhaus Ice Cream Sandwich

    Brooklyn residents bike, jog, and skate to Prospect Park on the weekends to eat the bizarrely satisfying ice cream sandwiches from theCoolhaus food truck. With their mix-and-match menu, you choose from a dizzying list of ice creams (including “beer and pretzels” and “cuban cigar”) and cookies (best: “s’mores”) to build your own frostysammy. They call it, er, “farchitecture”, from food and architecture.Coolhaus joins the Red Hook Lobster Pound truck outside the fair for breezy outdoor picnicking.Image courtesy of Emma Story

    Courtesy of Emma Story
  • Roberta’s Pizza

    Bushwick pizza joint Roberta’s will be holding it down at the fair with acafe deck furnished with two wood-fired pizza ovens. Last year, fair-goers could be seen clutching Roberta’s boxes as they perused the fair, and this year should be no different. We are partial to the superlative Margherita pizza with mozzarella, tomato, and basil, but the “Baby Sinclair” withdino kale andmaitake mushrooms looks pretty dope too. Rosé and beer on tap mean that this will be a sweet spot to meet friends post-fair.Image courtesy of Roberta’s

    Courtesy of Roberta’s
  • Momofuku Milk Bar Crack Pie

    To round out the group of NYC cult restaurants at Frieze, Christina Tosi’s sweets emporiumMomofuku Milk Bar will be making its first appearance at the fair. We will be lining up for a slice of New York classic Crack Pie, with its rich, distinctive salty-sweet filling. Special bonus points for the Birthday Cake Truffles, dense little nuggets of rainbow goodness which will also be available at the Milk Bar outpost.Image courtesy of Momofuku Milk Bar

    Courtesy of Momofuku Milk Bar

Inspired by Allen Ruppersberg’s mythic project, ‘Al’s Grand Hotel’, 1971, Los Angeles-based gallery Public Fiction has restaged the hotel to incredible detail as part of Frieze Projects, a series of specially commissioned site-specific works. Photography: Marco Scozzaro

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As far as art fairs go, the Frieze franchise knows how to deliver. Despite being dampened by drizzle, the London fair‘s younger New York sibling got off to a good start yesterday with visitors venturing over choppy waters to Randall’s Island for a first look at what the weekend has in store. Officially opening today, Frieze New York (9-12 May) touts a more cohesive programme this year, along with its consistent roster of big name contemporary art gallery participants.

There may not have been many surprise additions to the line-up, but Frieze has taken pains to create a memorable experience for art aficionados and casual gallery-goers alike. Its Frieze Projects programme of specially commissioned artworks is a particular highlight this year. The series of site-specific projects take place all over the island, even on water, with New York-based artist Marie Lorenz offering fairgoers the chance to join her in a makeshift rowing boat and tour Randall’s Island’s surrounding shores. Extending her previous concept, for which she led people around New York Harbour by boat, Lorenz’s tour offers visitors a rare, fresh perspective of viewing Frieze.

Another Frieze Projects triumph is the re-staging of Allen Ruppersberg’s mythic project, ‘Al’s Grand Hotel’. Back in 1971, the artist created and opened a fully functioning hotel for six weeks. The seven rooms were functional, themed installations and provided a place to congregate and generally have a good time. Despite being asked repeatedly over the years to reprise the hotel, Ruppersberg refused, until now. The persuading factor came in the form of Public Fiction, an Los Angeles-based gallery and publication run by Lauren Mackler, who produced an iteration of Ruppersberg’s concept for her own exhibition back in 2011. Says Mackler about the project: ‘I was inspired by Al’s concept and reached out to him. We had several conversations and he gave me a box full of ephemera from the original hotel – photographs, receipts, postcards, the original letterhead, everything.’

After several attempts over the years to return the ephemera to Ruppersburg, Mackler finally tracked him down again in 2013 – good timing since the older artist had been asked by Frieze Projects’ curator, Cecila Alemani, to recreate the hotel. Together, Ruppersburg and Mackler have re-staged the lobby and two rooms right in the middle of Frieze. Complete with hotel stationery, a seating area, a front desk, the new hotel has been recreated to impressive detail. Even the backdrops and textiles have been contributed by Maharam. Best of all, it will receive guests in both rooms, each night of the fair.

On scoring this coup, Alemani said, ‘I think [Ruppersburg] really liked the idea that this fictional space would only be around for five days, and then cease to exist. It really is in keeping with the spirit of his original concept.’

Elsewhere around the fair, we were particularly struck by Modern Art’s series of pixilated paintings by British artist Mark Flood, which each depict a familiar icon, and Andrew Krep’s installation of large, wood-framed tapestries by Goshka Macuga. David Zwirner packed a punch with its combination of Yayoi Kusama and Donald Judd pieces, while Gagosian Gallery played it cool with a series of new lithographs from Ed Ruscha.

Even the food at Frieze is worthy of acclaim. This year’s selection sees pop-ups from some of the New York’s most loved and fashionable names, such as Danny Bowien’s Mission Cantina, Carroll Garden’s Court Street Grocers, Roberta’s in Bushwick, Momofuku Milk Bar, The Fat Radish and Marlow & Sons. We’re not ones to go hungry, even for the sake of art.

Read more at http://www.wallpaper.com/art/frieze-new-york-2014-highlights-from-a-re-staging-of-als-grand-hotel-to-artful-boat-trips-round-randalls-island/7395#UPwyWJilksfzs7Ft.99

Frieze New York 2014 highlights: from a re-staging of Al’s Grand Hotel to artful boat trips round Randall’s Island

Inspired by Allen Ruppersberg’s mythic project, ‘Al’s Grand Hotel’, 1971, Los Angeles-based gallery Public Fiction has restaged the hotel to incredible detail as part of Frieze Projects, a series of specially commissioned site-specific works. Photography: Marco Scozzaro

1 / 47

As far as art fairs go, the Frieze franchise knows how to deliver. Despite being dampened by drizzle, the London fair‘s younger New York sibling got off to a good start yesterday with visitors venturing over choppy waters to Randall’s Island for a first look at what the weekend has in store. Officially opening today, Frieze New York (9-12 May) touts a more cohesive programme this year, along with its consistent roster of big name contemporary art gallery participants.

There may not have been many surprise additions to the line-up, but Frieze has taken pains to create a memorable experience for art aficionados and casual gallery-goers alike. Its Frieze Projects programme of specially commissioned artworks is a particular highlight this year. The series of site-specific projects take place all over the island, even on water, with New York-based artist Marie Lorenz offering fairgoers the chance to join her in a makeshift rowing boat and tour Randall’s Island’s surrounding shores. Extending her previous concept, for which she led people around New York Harbour by boat, Lorenz’s tour offers visitors a rare, fresh perspective of viewing Frieze.

Another Frieze Projects triumph is the re-staging of Allen Ruppersberg’s mythic project, ‘Al’s Grand Hotel’. Back in 1971, the artist created and opened a fully functioning hotel for six weeks. The seven rooms were functional, themed installations and provided a place to congregate and generally have a good time. Despite being asked repeatedly over the years to reprise the hotel, Ruppersberg refused, until now. The persuading factor came in the form of Public Fiction, an Los Angeles-based gallery and publication run by Lauren Mackler, who produced an iteration of Ruppersberg’s concept for her own exhibition back in 2011. Says Mackler about the project: ‘I was inspired by Al’s concept and reached out to him. We had several conversations and he gave me a box full of ephemera from the original hotel – photographs, receipts, postcards, the original letterhead, everything.’

After several attempts over the years to return the ephemera to Ruppersburg, Mackler finally tracked him down again in 2013 – good timing since the older artist had been asked by Frieze Projects’ curator, Cecila Alemani, to recreate the hotel. Together, Ruppersburg and Mackler have re-staged the lobby and two rooms right in the middle of Frieze. Complete with hotel stationery, a seating area, a front desk, the new hotel has been recreated to impressive detail. Even the backdrops and textiles have been contributed by Maharam. Best of all, it will receive guests in both rooms, each night of the fair.

On scoring this coup, Alemani said, ‘I think [Ruppersburg] really liked the idea that this fictional space would only be around for five days, and then cease to exist. It really is in keeping with the spirit of his original concept.’

Elsewhere around the fair, we were particularly struck by Modern Art’s series of pixilated paintings by British artist Mark Flood, which each depict a familiar icon, and Andrew Krep’s installation of large, wood-framed tapestries by Goshka Macuga. David Zwirner packed a punch with its combination of Yayoi Kusama and Donald Judd pieces, while Gagosian Gallery played it cool with a series of new lithographs from Ed Ruscha.

Even the food at Frieze is worthy of acclaim. This year’s selection sees pop-ups from some of the New York’s most loved and fashionable names, such as Danny Bowien’s Mission Cantina, Carroll Garden’s Court Street Grocers, Roberta’s in Bushwick, Momofuku Milk Bar, The Fat Radish and Marlow & Sons. We’re not ones to go hungry, even for the sake of art.

Read more at http://www.wallpaper.com/art/frieze-new-york-2014-highlights-from-a-re-staging-of-als-grand-hotel-to-artful-boat-trips-round-randalls-island/7395#UPwyWJilksfzs7Ft.99

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