Dallas Private Art Collections Poised To Rival Miami

Pauline Karpidas, one of the twelve most powerful art collectors in the world is opening a private collection space in Dallas. Karpidas has one of the world’s leading private gallery spaces in Hydra, Greece called the Hydra Workshop.

==

Pauline Karpidas

Pauline Karpidas

Who is she? The widow of Greek shipping tycoon Constantine Karpidas and a major patron of the arts.

What’s in her collection? British-born Karpidas owns a gallery on the Greek island of Hydra, where she has displayed works by Urs Fischer, Wilhelm Sasnal and Sergej Jensen, and more recently by American artists Frank Benson and Mark Grotjahn.

She made headlines in 2009 when she auctioned off Andy Warhol’s 200 One Dollar Bills for $43.8 million, more than 100 times what she paid for it two decades earlier.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/most-powerful-art-collectors-2011-12?op=1#ixzz3gT38Hd00

==

Monday, July 20, 2015

Rick Brettell

Dallas is a haven for private art spaces

1/6

Vernon Bryant/Staff Photographer

Jiro Yoshihara’s Work (left) and Rap Psalm II by John Chamberlain are shown at the Warehouse, which was founded by Cindy and Howard Rachofsky and Amy and Vernon Faulconer.

In late 17th-century Paris, almost a century before the opening of the Louvre, a determined English visitor, Dr. Lister, was amazed at how easy it was to gain entry to the private art collections of the city’s most prominent citizens. He wrote a guidebook to help others learn the ropes. Hint: You had to wear a sword, if you were a man, as it was a signifier of high social status.

Visitors to Dallas in the years before the 1908 opening of the Dallas Art Association’s permanent gallery in Fair Park would have been able to visit the private art gallery of Col. and Mrs. William L. Crawford, completed in 1900 next to their Ross Avenue “Eastlake Cottage.” The gallery was open to the public via its own door, allowing the Crawfords to go on about their lives in their vast cottage — all long gone.

Tempting as it might be to think that such galleries have gone the way of aristocrats’ noblesse oblige, private art spaces have made a comeback. In Dallas we have so many of them, the city rivals New York, Miami and Los Angeles.

Unlike museums conceived as public institutions, private art spaces are available to art lovers only in limited ways; they are not usually governed by independent boards or housed in buildings owned or managed by foundations or government bodies.

Nor are they like commercial art galleries that exist to sell artworks. In most private art spaces, there are no price lists or indications that works are for sale — usually, they aren’t. This frees viewers to respond to work as they would in a museum.

Generally, these new anti-institutions and anti-galleries adapt spaces to their purpose. Their names reflect this, including the Warehouse, the Power Station and the Reading Room.

The Goss-Michael Foundation was on the cutting edge here. Its Uptown origins and ambition to expose what’s called YBA — for young British artists — to a Dallas audience have broadened with its move to the Design District.

The foundation boasts a collection of more than 500 works, which are shown on a rotating basis. Unlike most private art spaces, the Goss-Michael Foundation has regular hours of operation, a public exhibition program and an artist residency program. It was founded in 2007 and its early openings were must-attend events, bringing the hype and glamour of the London scene to Dallas.

Adaptable venues

Two other ambitious spaces began to be considered by their owners.

The first to open formally was the Power Station, now nearly 5 years old, and operating in a former power station in Exposition Park. It’s a neighbor of 500X Gallery, one of Texas’ oldest artist cooperatives, and CentralTrak, the University of Texas at Dallas’ artist residency.

The Power Station space embodies the high-octane vision and taste of Alden and Janelle Pinnell and their foundation, which funds the programs and does so in a way that is anything but self-promotional. The Pinnell space is not for a growing private collection of more than 200 works by a mixture of A-list and experimental artists. Instead, it is a noncommercial venue in which artists conceive of projects for Dallas in a modified two-story industrial space. The third story and roof house visiting artists, foundation offices and are used to host parties and meals.

The Pinnells’ curatorial partner is New York art adviser Rob Teeters. They are committed both to highly experimental curation, much of it utterly noncommercial, and to a program of publication. The latter ensures that the Power Station has a permanent international record beyond the openings and programs organized in the space itself.

The largest and most ambitious private art space in Dallas, the Warehouse, came about more quickly. Its founders and major supporters, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky and Amy and Vernon Faulconer, realized that their respective collections were growing so rapidly, with the resulting large bills for storage and art handling, that they should combine to purchase a facility.

Contemporary art

After a search of a few months, they purchased a large warehouse near the Galleria Dallas in 2011. Its sheer scale made it possible for them to store their own collections, rent a good deal of space to a regional firm that stores and handles art, and also to create a contemporary museum-scale exhibition space. They hired a local architect, David Droese of Droese Raney Architecture, who designed a series of variously sized white, naturally lighted galleries that many visitors consider the single best space in North Texas to view contemporary art.

The gallery space itself is more than 18,000 square feet, larger by 4,000 than the largest temporary exhibition space in a Dallas museum. More than 8,000 square feet have been set aside for storage and an additional 3,500 square feet for offices, library, kitchen and meeting area. Unlike the Power Station, the Warehouse, which opened in 2012, is financed completely privately, without a foundation to act as a tax shelter for its owners.

This privacy creates the conditions for flexibility and autonomy. No one interferes. No one unwanted is admitted. No one complains about cost overruns or carps about the schedule. Like the Pinnells at the Power Station, the owners of the Warehouse consult regularly with a New York adviser, in this case, Allan Schwartzman.

The Warehouse draws the crème de la crème of the contemporary art scene. The day I spoke with Howard Rachofsky, a group of collectors from Germany had toured the space. The previous time I was there, Dallas collector Marguerite Hoffman had a London visitor in tow. More recently, the British sculptor Phyllida Barlow and her painter-writer husband, Fabian Peake, were given a private tour.

The only important private art space in Dallas that does not focus on contemporary art is the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum of Samurai Art in Uptown. It’s a dramatically installed gallery designed by the architectural team of Harwood International, the company owned by the Barbier-Muellers. It’s fully staffed and open six days a week without an appointment. With no board of trustees or permanent advisers, this Samurai collection functions as the public extension of a family. Indeed, many of the elements of armor in the display were formerly shown in their home.

Smaller spaces

Some of the most interesting private spaces are small.

At the Reading Room, the highly intellectual art space conceived and curated by founder-director Karen Weiner, word-based art is exhibited and performed. Housed in a tiny one-room building on Parry Avenue across from the main entrance to Fair Park, it opened in 2010 and has nurtured a growing text-based art scene in Dallas with more than 60 curated exhibitions, readings and performances.

Its newer neighbor, the Wilcox Space, is housed in the former home and studio of John Wilcox, one of the most distinguished abstract painters in Dallas. He died in 2012. Redesigned by Cunningham Architects, the space features regular curated exhibitions of his work and is owned and maintained by his younger brother, David. It is open by appointment only.

More to come

More private art spaces are on the way in the Dallas Design District.

One, the Karpidas Space, has recently completed renovation of a building. The London collector Pauline Karpidas and her Dallas-based son and daughter-in-law are behind it. The Karpidas Collection of Contemporary Art is so important globally that this opening is keenly anticipated.

Another, called Site131, is being built by the mother-son team of Joan and Seth Davidow in a restored warehouse on Payne Street. It’s programming will pair local contemporary artists with national and international figures.

Dallas trendsetter Capera Ryan has purchased a warehouse at 171 Oak Lawn and is exploring many options for independently curated installations of art.

Ten years ago, none of these private art spaces existed, and with their extraordinary fluorescence, Dallas will soon rival Miami, where the private art spaces movement first took off in the United States.

With shorter planning cycles, greater freedom of expression and almost libertarian license to do what their owners want, these spaces seem as freewheeling as Texas itself. They have done as much as the local art museums to create the conditions for an informed, arts-oriented public.

Let’s hope that this arena of the art world remains as vital as it has been in the last decade.

Rick Brettell is founding director of the Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History at the University of Texas at Dallas. He is a former director of the Dallas Museum of Art.

 

Plan your life

Goss-Michael Foundation, 1405 Turtle Creek Blvd.

Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays. 214-696-0555. g-mf.org.

The Power Station, 3816 Commerce St.

Hours: 1-5 p.m. Fridays and by appointment. 214-827-0163. powerstationdallas.com.

The Warehouse, 14105 Inwood Road. By appointment; see thewarehousedallas.org for details.

The Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum, the Samurai Collection, 2501 N. Harwood St. (St. Ann’s Restaurant in the old St. Ann’s School).

Hours: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Tuesdays

11 a.m.-6 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays. 214-965-1032. samuraicollection.org.

The Reading Room, 3715 Parry Ave. By appointment. thereadingroom-dallas.blogspot.com.

The Wilcox Space, 824 Exposition Ave., No. 9.

By appointment. johnwilcoxart.com.

Karpidas Space, 1532 Hi Line Drive. Not yet open; no website.

Site131, 131 Payne St. Not yet open; no website.

171 Oak Lawn. Open only for events; no website.

photos

 

==

 

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-05

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-05

 

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-04-953x576

 

 

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-01

 

 

 

Art • May, 22 2014 • By staff
Dallas Rising: Contemporary Art in the Texan Metropolis
With the closing of the most successful iteration of the Dallas Art Fair behind us, Dallas has established itself as one of the U.S.’s most important art cities. Join us as we take a closer look at the city’s resurgence.

Dallas is currently undergoing a cultural renaissance thanks to the reemergence of a vibrant, diverse and spontaneous art scene. Traditionally, Texas has had a rich artistic history thanks in part to the city of Austin and perhaps most famously to Donald Judd and his development of a minimalistic Marfa utopia.

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-02d

The city in the high desert of West Texas became the artistic center of Texas during the mid to late 1970s following a collaboration between Judd and the Dia Foundation that saw the decommissioned Fort DA Russell transformed into art spaces designed to present individual artist’s collections permanently. Judd had become disillusioned by the short duration of museum exhibitions, seeing these restrictions as a major stumbling block to fully understanding the work of the artist on view. Thanks to the commitment of the both the Judd and Chinati foundations, the city continues to serve as a site for artistic experimentation. Current attractions include Prada Marfa, a popup art exhibit, the Lannan Foundation Writers Residency Program and a multifunctional art space dubbed, “Ballroom Marfa.”

Alongside Marfa, Austin has also functioned as an artistic beacon in Texas. The city is home to the University of Texas, Austin’s Blanton Museum of Art – one of the largest university museums in the United States – and since 1987 has hosted South by Southwest. The festival has since developed into Austin’s cultural draw through its focus on music, film and interactive media. As a result, attendance has grown significantly and it now regularly draws crowds of over 20,000 people each March.

Bearing in mind the size, location and stature of Marfa and Austin, Dallas is still the largest economic center in Texas. What remains most interesting about the situation is that despite the economic importance of Dallas, the artistic and cultural success of both Marfa and Austin has meant that Dallas has never been so remarkably spoken about when it comes to the arts.

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-04

However, this is beginning to change. As it’s happened the world over – in New York’s Meatpacking District, Miami’s Wynwood, Cape Town’s Woodstock and London’s Hoxton – artists have become the catalyst for the revitalization of dilapidated and derelict neighborhoods that have fallen prey to recent economic and industrial failures. The nature of these forgotten industrial areas allows artists to find large spaces for greatly reduced prices and they’re ultimately able to execute projects that wouldn’t be viable in highly commercialized downtown areas, resulting in radically transformed neighborhoods which often become frequented tourist attractions.

It’s this exciting process of redevelopment that Dallas finds itself currently undergoing. With the establishment and subsequent expansion of the Dallas Art Fair, the renovation and repositioning of the Joule Hotel as Dallas’ very own art boutique hotel, the reemergence of the reputable Dallas Contemporary, and a group of passionate artists and collectors, the city now has all the makings of a major artistic city.

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-01

Around since 1978, Dallas Contemporary is busy enjoying a reinvigoration and currently hosts a Richard Phillips retrospective alongside Julian Schnabel’s first U.S. museum presentation since the ’80s. These two high-profile exhibitions only serve to further reinforce the institution’s reestablishment as a major artistic venue for contemporary art. The Richard Phillips retrospective, which also happens to be his first U.S. solo museum survey, brings together both new and past work that highlight his career long exploration of themes of political and social identity, eroticized desire and consumerism. Meanwhile, Julian Schnabel’s presentation of 15 monumental paintings created over the last decade highlight a sense of cinematic intuition inspired by his work as a filmmaker.

Most importantly though, is that both these exhibitions indicate the ability of Dallas Contemporary to present highly reputable and respected contemporary art exhibitions. The fact that both artists were willing to participate is an important indication of their recognition of Dallas as a major art city.

Alongside Dallas Contemporary, the repositioning of Dallas as a cultural/artistic capital has been driven in part by the renovation of Joule Hotel. The $78 million dollar renovation saw the hotel completely overhauled and remodeled into a boutique art hotel, now housing the collection of hotel owner Tim Headington. The hotel has revitalized downtown Dallas and has become a must-visit for all art fair goers. WMagazine has described the hotel as “Texas charm meets artworld panache,” and the hotel’s commitment to the arts in Dallas is epitomized by their hosting of The Eyeball, an annual culminating gala celebrating Dallas Art Week.

“Dallas collectors are renowned for being especially collaborative in nature, buying a piece of art together and rotating it between collections, or pooling money to buy a work for a museum.”

As the art world continues to shift its attention from galleries and museums to the craze of the art fair calendar, every major city is now required to present their own iteration in order to stay relevant. Dallas is no different. For 6 years now, the city has presented the Dallas Art Fair for a week in April. In that short time the fair has experienced an increasing amount of growth and expansion, similar to fairs in New York and Miami, a fact highlighted by Interview Magazine. As a result of its ever-increasing popularity, the fair has grown to host over 90 national and international galleries including staples like James Fuentes, OHWOW and Jonathan Viner.

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-03

Nowhere else is this transformation more visible than in Dallas’ Deep Ellum neighborhood. Formerly an industrial area home to one of Henry Ford’s earliest automobile plants, Deep Ellum has blossomed into a physical manifestation of the successful growth of cultural Dallas. Left abandoned and desolate for years, most of the real estate was gobbled up by developer Scott Ruhrman, who has set about transforming the area into one of the most visited artistic hubs within the city. The large amounts of space combined with his commitment and financial investment, and that of others, has allowed the neighborhood to develop into a home for some of the city’s most exciting young artists and curators.

Consequently, the area has become a source for artistic experimentation due to the willingness of people like Ruhrman to support these endeavors. The neighborhood has now become Dallas’ very own artistic tourist destination thanks to its redevelopment through various cultural programs, such as “Deep Ellum Windows,” an ephemeral pop up installation series, celebrating the temporality of the viewing experience alongside a wide array of vibrant street art murals.

dallas-rising-contemporary-art-in-the-texan-metropolis-02

Furthermore, one cannot discount the role of collectors in helping reposition the city. Collectors, along with artists, have been at the forefront of neighborhood and institutional revitalization. Their involvement has emphasized the collaborative nature of the Dallas renaissance. This is a sentiment shared by Alden Pinell, a skincare tycoon, art collector and the artistic director of The Power Station, a conceptually explorative exhibition space in downtown Dallas. “Dallas collectors are renowned for being especially collaborative in nature, buying a piece of art together and rotating it between collections, or pooling money to buy a work for a museum,” he lets on. Such involvement in the local art scene is an indication of the shared passion necessary for progressive development of the city’s arts and culture.

Most intriguing about the emergence of Dallas as a cultural capital is how involved the people of Dallas are in the process. Whether it be local artists, collectors, real estate developers or just the general viewing audience, this is a project driven by people who love their city. It remains to be seen how long the rise lasts, but for now, with a stream of media interest and a large group of passionate supporters, Dallas truly is the toast of Texas.

Written by Houghton Kinsman for Highsnobiety.com

 

==

Unpacking the Dallas Scene’s Disproportionate Art World Influence

The Coasts may often scoff at Dallas’s higher-the-hair attitude, labeling its tendencies as money-flashing at its most conspicuous. But, against those odds, the city has recently become an American arts destination—and one that looks fresher and more fortified than many of the culture capitals flanking Ol’ Glory’s oceans.

That’s not to say Dallas is a stranger to contemporary art. Insiders have long whispered about its red-hot market, well-funded institutions, and surreptitious yet far-reaching influence. A triumvirate of Dallas collectors were, for many years, the only names associated with the city: the Rachofskys, the Roses, and the Hoffmans. But, while Howard and Cindy, Deedie and Rusty, and Marguerite (continuing on without her late husband, Robert) are still crucial to the scene—Gutai would never have known the Guggenheim, nor Sigmar Polke the MoMA, nor even Gerhard Richter his soaring prices without them—the art world in the Big D has grown so substantially in recent years, it needn’t rely just on its Big Three.

“What seems unusual about the collectors in Dallas is that they work together as one group to make the Dallas art scene a better place,” says Kenny Goss, a mega-force in the communal collecting collective, who spearheads MTV Re:Define, a charitable arts-and-music endeavor that, now in its third year, is a crucial component to what’s now referred to as Dallas Arts Week, an intermingling of arts events, which sum up the city’s scene. There’s the seventh edition of the Dallas Art Fair, which hosts 90 international and local galleries and a slew of philanthropic galas, plus exhibitions timed to be unveiled synchronously at the city’s premiere institutions. The short-list of those includes the Dallas Museum of Art (DMA), the Nasher Sculpture Center, Southern Methodist University (SMU)’s Meadows Museum, and Dallas Contemporary.

At the helm of the DMA stands much-discussed director Maxwell Anderson, a Harvard scholar with a flair for retooling how a museum is managed (something which has run him into trouble and out of New York; though his successes in Dallas have certainly quieted the haters). He notes that “Dallas is very fortunate to have such a concentration of arts institutions and arts talent, and any city would be grateful for a comparable pool of organizations and people.”  Beyond the museum walls, there are the private foundations. Forget not that Dallas is a town where philanthropy is sport, and arts patronage is deeply ingrained within the upper echelons of society. Deedie Rose oversees The Pump House, a converted water station housing her acquisitions that opens up for social soirees. Howard Rachofsky created The Warehouse for the public display of his over 9,000-work-strong collection of Arte Povera, Gutai, and Minimalism. And younger collector Alden Pinnell has his Power Station, a contemporary outpost for edgier artists.

“We’re beginning to see collaboration between foundations and institutions,” continues Goss. “For example, we’re bringing Michael Craig-Martin to Dallas and working with various public and private institutions and the city of Dallas to exhibit his work in unique sites through the year.”  The overlap is partnership on all sides. Chris Byrne, who co-founded the Dallas Art Fair, adds: “Its impossible not to acknowledge the Dallas patrons and institutions that made the fair possible. We are fortunate to have the Ei Arakawa performance at the DMA, the Power Station’s reception for Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys, as well as Dallas Contemporary’s opening of David Salle and Nate Lowman.”

“Melvin Edwards: Five Decades” at the Nasher Sculpture Center. Courtesy Nasher Sculpture Center.

In fact, one thing remarked upon by any arts professional working in the Dallas-Fort Worth area is this jointed relationship. Christen Wilson, who along with her husband Derek sits on the DMA and Nasher boards, the International Council of the Tate Modern, and the Met’s Costume Institute, represents this younger wave of Dallas collectors. “Dallas is friendly and caring about their community,” she says. “The older generation of collectors actively mentors the younger generation of collectors.  It gives us all a pass-it-on kind of a feeling.” The weaving of patronage and institutional support certainly is the backbone of what has catapulted Dallas into the national consciousness. “We actually have fun here and it is not a competition,” continues Wilson, remarking on a quality readily identified as making Dallas unique. However, the city’s art scene doesn’t begin and end with the robust funnel between patron’s pockets and the museum’s walls.

Any thriving art scene needs one thing to be considered a scene: artists. Dallas may not be Miami or Detroit, where the derelict urban landscapes breed cheap rents and endless experimentation, but it does have a supportive art gallery system, as well as independently working artists and those within residencies, such as CentralTrak, the University of Texas’s consistently excellent program. “People are pretty savvy,” explains Barry Whistler, who for 20 years or so lead the development of the Deep Ellum neighborhood as Dallas’s unofficial gallery district (not to be confused with the city-funded Dallas Arts District, wherein the museums are housed.) “There’s a sophistication level that gets our artists shown here and in places out there. There’s an undercurrent, too, that can link the city to Marfa and Donald Judd.” says Whistler, whose own roster is a mix of Dallas-based artists and others who live on the coasts. With stalwarts like Conduit Gallery and Talley Dunn—who represents local art star David Bates and rising one Jeff Elrod—and alluring project spaces like The Reading Room and The Public Trust, “major dealers around the world began to come to Dallas to both investigate what’s happening here but also to engage in our community seeking exhibition opportunities for their own artists,” chimes in Goss.

It’s not just the galleries promoting local talent. Artists, too, have created their own collectives with project spaces, such as BEEFHAUS, Homeland Security, and Vice Palace, a space created by Arthur Peña, who as the Dallas Observer dubbed “easily runs some of the best shows in Dallas.” Whistler adds, “there’s been an interesting trend of artists coming in and renting a space for, say, two weeks,” citing the star of his own roster, Nathan Green, as being instrumental in the artist community—he is part of the collective Okay Mountain—especially in the neighborhood Trinity Grove, where he shares a studio with four other artists.

It’s also not solely on the creative side that artists are championing each other. When Oliver Francis Gallery (OFG.XXX) relaunched in Deep Ellum, it billed itself as a bit of an enfant terrible of the independent art spaces. Kevin Rubén Jacobs, who overlords the project, touts a distinctly Dallas-Fort Worth-based artist regime, and has ignited and elevated the critical conversation. Another leading local, Michael Mazurek, spearheads the artist-driven and non-profit Dallas Biennial, which for DB14, held last year, hosted a four-month program in over 12 venues across the city. “Don’t forget that this town has grown because we have all worked together,” urges Wilson. “As museums, curators and private project spaces have all increased and improved through private and city investments, the artists coming to show are more acclaimed and have international followings, that has led to an increased base of collectors in Dallas. That in turn has brought more gallery interest. This all feeds on itself.”

Julie Baumgardner

===

W MAGAZINE

JUNE 2014

Culture » Art & Design » Dallas Buyers Club

Dallas Buyers Club
Art patrons Cindy and Howard Rachofsky and Amy and Vernon Faulconer are overwhelmed by Tom Friedman’s Untitled, 2003, inside the Warehouse.

Dallas Buyers Club

Two Texas supercollectors join forces and open the Warehouse.

At a time when the most highly prized trophy in the art world is a private museum with your name on it, the latest undertaking by two Texas collectors, Howard Rachofsky and Vernon Faulconer, seems downright modest. Together, they have transformed an 18,000-square-foot -furniture-storage facility in their hometown, Dallas, into a gallery showcasing works from their individual collections as well as those bought jointly with fellow Dallas Museum of Art trustees—but neither of their names appears on the facade. “It’s a yours, mine, and ours collection,” Rachofsky says of the space, which is called, simply, the Warehouse.There are about 1,000 pieces in the Warehouse’s collection, displayed on a rotating basis in thematic shows. In addition to the exhibition space, the 60,000-square-foot building houses a library and an education-program area. The pair leases part of the space to an art-handling company so that, Rachofsky explains, “I can say, ‘We need to hang a work—can you send two guys over?’ ”The idea for the Warehouse came to Rachofsky, a former hedge fund manager, about four years ago, by which time he and his close friend Faulconer, an oil entrepreneur, had jointly purchased several major pieces. After concluding that Faulconer owned works too large-scale for his homes and that Rachofsky and his wife, Cindy, owned too many to fit inside their Richard Meier–designed house, they decided to find a place where their stored treasures could see the light of day and that would be welcoming to the public. “Verne’s is a buy-what-you-like collection,” says Rachofsky, who owns the bulk of the Warehouse’s offerings. “Mine is more purposeful. Verne said to me, ‘Ah, heck, this is a great deal for me because I get to come and look at all the art, and you’ve paid for it.’”Rachofsky began collecting in 1972—first, prints by Joan Miró, Alexander Calder, and Pablo Picasso; then works by American masters like Helen Frankenthaler and Donald Judd. Eventually he moved on to the postwar Japanese and Italian movements, and started developing an interest in younger artists. In June 2008, he and his wife sold Jeff Koons’s 1995–2000 sculpture Balloon Flower (Magenta) at auction for $25.8 million to buy a group of 1982 Sigmar Polke paintings, currently on view at the Warehouse. They are part of an exhibition in rooms dedicated to single artists, including Marlene Dumas and Gerhard Richter. Last summer, Rachofsky and Faulconer purchased the largest sculpture from Koons’s recent Gazing Ball series of white plaster figures with blue glass globes that, following its loan to the Koons retrospective opening this month at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, will take up residence in the Warehouse.

At the moment, one of the duo’s favorite pieces is Tom Friedman’s Untitled, 2003, co-owned by the Rachofskys and the Dallas Museum of Art, where the collection will ultimately land. “I think of it as Little Big Man,” Rachofsky says. “It’s so strong that it’s the only work in the room.” Made of Styrofoam, “it weighs almost nothing, yet it has great presence. It was an instant love affair.”

====

Private Art Collections Creating Greater Influence in the Art World

Derek and Christen Wilson Install Private Collection

Derek and Christen Wilson Art Collection

Dallas Architecture Blog celebrates the art of architecture and place. This post celebrates the impact of private art collections in architecturally significant homes. Private collectors are nimbler in their collecting and their collections rapidly generate thought and momentum for specific art and artists.

Museums Judiciously and Carefully Acquire Art

Richard Meier Designed Modern Home

Museums judiciously acquire work through the eyes of the museum director and staff, with the approval of the acquisitions committee and the board of trustees. Art chosen by this process is very thorough and heavily juried by the art directors and associate directors who have the highest academic credentials and museum experience, and then by art patrons that make up the acquisition committee followed by the art and business judgment of the board of trustees. With board approval, funds might be drawn from a museum endowment for the acquisition or a development campaign might begin for a specific painting. Even donations of art to a museum have to go through this process for approval. This ponderous process builds great museums that traditionally have shaped how a community views art.

Derek and Christen Wilson Art Collection

The Nimbler Approach of Private Collectors, Like Derek and Christen Wilson, Have an Increasing Influence on the Direction of Art

Derek and Christen Wilson Art Collection

It should be noted that private art collections are hardly a product of an underground or guerilla art movement. Prominent private collectors are often very involved in the leadership of art museums. For instance, collectors Derek and Christen Wilson, when they make acquisitions for their personal collection displayed in their Highland Park home, are able to seek, if they desire, the counsel of their vast resource of museum curators, art consultants, and gallery owners because they enjoy leadership roles at the Dallas Museum of Art, the Nasher Sculpture Center, and the Tate Museum. But ultimately a personal collection is just that, a personal decision that reflects the collector’s taste. Some pieces might be acquired after having followed and studied the artist for years, while other acquisitions might be informed but quite spontaneous. The collection grows and the collector’s eye sharpens.

Derek and Christen Wilson Art Collection

Private collections, like the one in Derek and Christen Wilson’s Old Highland Park home, are viewed by other collectors, museum directors, and curators from across the city, the country, and the world as they visit the collector’s home and see their art. This dynamic creates a great cross-pollination of ideas, views, and further introduction to artists’ works. These private visits not only influence other personal collections but they influence the eventual acquisitions of the museums with which these visitors are involved.

Dallas Art Collectors are Generous With Their Collections

Scott Lyons Designed Texas Modern Home

Private art collectors, such as Margaret McDermott and her late husband, Eugene, have always been generous with their art, loaning it to museums and opening their home to those interested in art from Dallas and from around the world.

Howard and Cindy Rachofsky generously open their Richard Meier-designed home to the public to see their rotating, dynamic collection of modern art.

Richard Meier Designed Modern Home

The collection of Marguerite and the late Robert Hoffman is viewed by prominent collectors from around the world in the residential gallery designed by architect Bill Booziotis.

Architect Bill Booziotis Designed Home in Preston Hollow

Deedie and Rusty Rose display significant art in their Antoine Predock-designed home and in their adjacent pump house, renovated by architect Gary Cunningham, that provides space for exhibitions and art events.

Antoine Predock-designed home

The McDermotts, the Roses, the Hoffmans, and the Rachofskys have also made unprecedented bequests of their collections to the Dallas Art Museum furthering how art will be viewed and interpreted over the next century.

Art Evolves as Does the Dynamic That Influences Art

Dallas collectors generously share their personal collections with the community. Now private collectors are able to continue to show their art in their homes through private visits, but now they’re also able to share their art collections through the Internet and Social Media.

Art Collection of Derek and Christen Wilson

Here you’re able to see some of the additions to the collection of Derek and Christen Wilson in a recent installation in their Highland Park modern home.

Derek and Christen Wilson Art CollectionDerek and Christen Wilson Art CollectionDerek and Christen Wilson Art CollectionDerek and Christen Wilson Art Collection

John and Lisa Runyon at home in Dallas with Richard Phillips’s Mask, 1995.

Dallas

Once known for J.R. Ewing, a football team and an assassination, the Texas city is now—thanks to a civic-minded group of philanthropists—a bona fide arts destination. Meet the lone stars behind the Dallas cultural boom.

Dallas: Who's Behind the Arts Boom? -

Kenny Goss at home with, from left, Tim Noble and Sue Webster’s Excessive Sensual Indulgence, 1996, and Nigel Cooke’s Experience, 2009.

Dallas: Who's Behind the Arts Boom? -

Howard and Cindy Rachofsky in front of Richard Meier’s 1996 Rachofsky House.

Dallas: Who's Behind the Arts Boom? -

Marguerite Hoffman at home with Andy Warhol’s Little Electric Chair

 

It’s a bright spring morning in Dallas, and Deedie Rose, a stylish, sixtysomething philanthropist, has just emerged from her red vintage BMW in front of the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Composed of an opera house and a theater—designed by Lord Norman Foster and Rem Koolhaas, respectively—the center opened last October with a series of splashy galas and an open house that attracted tens of thousands. Today, Rose, who is considered by many to be a fairy godmother of the Dallas arts scene, having chaired the architectural committee that selected Koolhaas and enthusiastically drummed up financial support for the project from fellow members of her posh social circle, is bubbling over with facts and anecdotes as she leads a tour of the aluminum-clad theater. Rose relates how 135 families each gave $1 million or more to the endeavor—and not all of them are the type to quote Shakespeare or swoon over an aria. “Really, most of our money came from people who were not traditional performing arts supporters,” says Rose, whose husband, Rusty, once owned the Texas Rangers baseball team with George W. Bush. “There were people who said, ‘Don’t ever make me go to the opera because I’m never gonna go, but I’ll give you the money.’”That kind of thinking would be unusual in most American cities where, for example, major individual donors to New York City Ballet generally, well, enjoy ballet. But in Dallas these days, it’s civic pride as much as personal passion that’s driving cultural philanthropy—and judging by the Big D’s current arts boom, Dallasites have plenty of pride in their hometown. In less than a decade, the city has created, as if from scratch, one of the country’s most dynamic arts scenes. Since the 2003 opening of the Nasher Sculpture Center in an elegant Renzo Piano pavilion, a $1.2 billion contemporary art–filled Cowboys Stadium made its debut; and three local families—the Roses, along with Howard and Cindy Rachofsky and Robert and Marguerite Hoffman—pledged their entire collections, reportedly valued at $215 million, to the Dallas Museum of Art, setting the regional museum on the fast track to national stature. While local philanthropists seem split on whether to invest in content, as at the DMA, or trophy facades, they are united in the belief that the arts are worth paying for. Indeed, one way to look at the boom is through the prism of the so-called Bilbao effect, in which investment in an arts institution catalyzes a citywide revival. Played out on the larger Texas stage, the strategy might instead be called the Dallas ambition—an intent to build a complete cultural identity by funding a whole slate of projects.Of course, there are limits to the rush to culture. In early 2009 Dallas Opera general director George Steel, freshly arrived from New York, bolted town after only four months for a post at New York City Opera. And no amount of money can compete with weighty reputations accrued over decades—such as at the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth or Houston’s Menil Collection. Still, Dallas has many of the fundamentals in place. The three families’ 2005 gift to the DMA, selections of which were first exhibited in the aptly named 2007 exhibition “Fast Forward,” has both the breadth and depth (five Robert Rymans, for instance) to form the core of an important permanent collection.

Jennifer Eagle, whose husband, John, is president of the museum’s board, contrasts the donation with what she has seen in cities such as Miami, where the Rubell, de la Cruz and other families have founded their own mini museums. “Here, everyone is building our one museum,” she gushes. “It’s a beautiful thing.”

When asked to describe the thought process that went into giving it all away, Cindy Rachofsky says the story is so brief that it might be disappointing. It begins in the Napa Valley, where the Hoffmans and the Rachofskys always spend New Year’s Eve together. “We were there sitting by the fire, drinking great wine, and Robert looks at us and says, ‘Would you ever consider donating your collection to the museum?’” recalls Cindy. “We said, ‘Absolutely.’ It was as simple as that. There was no background.”

Later that evening, Howard, a retired hedge fund manager, announced that he also wanted to throw in their 1996 Richard Meier–designed house on acres of lawn dotted with sculptures. When the two couples told Deedie their plan, she signed on too. Cindy jokingly describes the scene as a “kumbaya” moment, while Howard concedes that the decision appears almost impulsive. But looking back he says he’s satisfied that it was “unequivocally the right thing to do.”

“It’s collaboration,” adds Howard, who has a showman’s charisma and often includes purple in his elegantly offbeat attire. “It’s working together to accomplish something that individually you couldn’t do as well.”

This collaborative spirit was forged as early as 2002, when the Rachofskys and the Hoffmans made the unconventional move of jointly buying a Gerhard Richter with the museum. “I call it our time-share,” says Marguerite, who with her late husband, a Coca-Cola bottling magnate, amassed a collection of luminous paintings (Diebenkorn, Twombly, Doig) and major sculptures (Judd, Whiteread, Gober). “It was expensive, but we really needed it here in Dallas.”

The Richter now hangs in Marguerite’s bedroom (the museum has first dibs), while a Gabriel Orozco currently installed chez Rachofsky is partially owned by the Roses. “We both have too much stuff,” says Deedie, who lives in a monumental modernist bunker by Antoine Predock that is stuffed with richly textural works by Robert Ryman, Piero Manzoni, Sol LeWitt and Gordon Matta-Clark. “Neither one of us can show everything that we’ve got; therefore we buy together,” she continues. “Sometimes we’ll get a piece that’s more expensive than what I might buy or he might buy alone. We’ll say, ‘Let’s pool our resources.’”

Deedie, who also serves as chairwoman of the DMA, has her hand in arts organizations all over town, but the true spiritual leader of Dallas cultural philanthropy is 98-year-old Margaret McDermott. Together with her late husband, Texas Instruments cofounder Eugene McDermott, she established an art-buying fund in 1960, and over the years Mrs. McDermott, as she is universally known, has dipped into it to pay for major gifts across nearly every

curatorial department of the DMA. To say that she remains active is an understatement. She flies to New York with museum curators to inspect works for purchase, communicates her expectations to board members (“When I took my job, she called me over to her chair, and said, ‘I want you to know who the boss is,’” John Eagle recalls with a smile) and insists that at the institution’s annual Art Ball fundraiser, the evening’s gala chair escort her through the galleries to preview new exhibitions.

“Of course, you’re running around like your hair’s on fire, but when Mrs. McDermott arrives, you have to stop whatever else you’re doing,” says former Houstonite Suzanne Droese, who now lives in Dallas with her architect husband, David. Suzanne is a worker bee on the young charity circuit, having chaired both the Art Ball and the equally glitzy Cattle Baron’s Ball. (This fall she will cochair the annual Two x Two benefit at the Rachofskys’ house, which will feature a well-stocked art auction—last year’s boasted a rare Marlene Dumas painting—and in its 11-year history has raised $25 million for amfAR and the DMA.)

The Dallas art scene’s junior crowd also includes art dealer John Runyon and his wife, Lisa, who, like Suzanne Droese, is doing what’s expected in this social setting—she’s chairing next year’s Art Ball. Elsewhere around town the most shocking art belongs to Kenny Goss, a Texas native, who, with his partner, George Michael—yes, that George Michael—collects once Young British Artists such as Tracey Emin, Damien Hirst and the Chapman brothers. At the moment the loudest “Have you seen it?” buzz surrounds an art-filled Philip Johnson mansion lavishly restored by Naomi Aberly, the most prominent Obama supporter in a community of rock-ribbed Republicans, and her husband, Larry Lebowitz, a hedge fund manager. And in the same swanky Preston Hollow neighborhood, the Eagles reside in a flat-roofed tropical-style villa designed by noted modernist architect Edward Durell Stone and hung with works by Elizabeth Peyton, Mark Bradford and Sigmar Polke—the last of which they share, yes, with the Rachofskys.

Though not a serious collector, Lucy Billingsley, a tough-minded, second-generation real-estate developer, has made her own substantial investment in the Arts District with One Arts Plaza, the first major new building erected downtown since the real-estate crash of the late Eighties. (It houses 61 condos, along with trendy restaurants and the corporate headquarters of 7-Eleven.) Billingsley, by her reckoning, is a fifth-generation Texan, and she counts her late father, Trammell Crow, as one of the outsize, almost heroic figures who threw their energies into building downtown after WWII, at a time when, she says, Dallas was an insignificant place where “two railroads crossed.”

“You talk about bravado? He had a huge spirit,” says Billingsley, who is no shrinking violet herself. “That is the essence of a Texan, right?”

Crow erected some of the marquee glass towers that today define the Dallas skyline, and a small museum near the DMA is devoted to his Asian art collection. He also helped fund the city’s most idiosyncratic public artwork: a life-size herd of cast bronze longhorn steers that the contemporary crowd seems to find an embarrassing reminder of old Dallas.

Today’s town boosters would rather highlight the Koolhaas and Foster buildings, which are named for the Wyly and Winspear families, respectively. Businessman Bill Winspear and his wife, Margot, gave $42 million to the opera house—one of the largest donations ever to an opera company. And mild-mannered entrepreneur Charles Wyly and his wife, Dee, wrote a $20 million check for the theater. In the eyes of one conservative Dallas stalwart, Koolhaas’s techno tower appears to be half finished at best. “Some might say that,” Deedie Rose fires back. “And what I’d say is that the play is what finishes it. It’s a machine for theater.”

With the performing arts center well on its way to completion, the focus has shifted to creating Woodall Rodgers park, which will span the freeway separating the Arts District from uptown. On the far side of the green space, the Perot Museum of Nature & Science—paid for in part by a large gift from Ross Perot’s family and designed by edgy Pritzker Prize–winner Thom Mayne—is scheduled to open in 2013. (Mayne will be the latest in a string of Pritzker laureates to build in Dallas, after Foster, Koolhaas, Piano, Johnson—whose oversize postmodern whimsies were popular during the punch-drunk days of the early-Eighties energy boom—and I.M. Pei.) And on the west side of town, work has begun on a pair of bridges designed by Santiago Calatrava. Again, the project is supported partly by private fundraising, which also draws heavily on corporations headquartered in the region, including AT&T, American Airlines, ExxonMobil and numerous financial companies that service the state’s oil and gas industry.

“It’s been a shock to some executives who have moved their companies here,” says Charles Wyly. “They have been floored by what they are asked to do. We have pretty high expectations for our leaders.”

Even the Dallas Cowboys have caught the culture bug. Out at the new stadium, team owner Jerry Jones and his wife, Gene—he’s as tough as Patton; she’s a Chanel-clad steel magnolia—made room for a serious public arts program. “We have nothing contemporary in our home, nothing,” says Gene, noting that her taste in decor runs toward Mediterranean, while her husband’s private, sports-theme art collection includes Norman Rockwell’s The Toss. “But anyone will tell you that a great home should have great art, and though this stadium isn’t our home—it is. We wanted to make it a great building, and I felt like it needed great art. Not just posters of football and sports.”

Gene convened an advisory committee that included Howard Rachofsky and hired San Francisco–based art consultant Mary Zlot. Fourteen site-specific works were commissioned from such artists as Olafur Eliasson and Matthew Ritchie. The large public pieces are prominently installed—a 126-foot painting by Terry Haggerty hangs above a concession stand, and a Franz Ackermann mural explodes with color in a stairwell—while smaller works by Doug Aitken, Eva Rothschild and others hang in the lobby and VIP areas. Jerry points out that Cowboys home games get bigger television ratings than Dancing With the Stars and that the Dallas-hosted 2011 Super Bowl will be seen by more than a billion people, which amounts to massive exposure for highbrow culture. “If between plays, Al Michaels and John Madden are talking about the art and architecture here, well, that’s something you don’t get from a normal museum,” Jerry says.

As innovative as the stadium project is, it also has a clear precedent in Dallas. In the early Sixties, real-estate developer Ray Nasher built one of the country’s first enclosed shopping malls, NorthPark Center, in cotton fields north of town, and installed pieces from his private sculpture collection to add a bit of high-toned polish. “At the time people thought he had literally lost his mind,” says Jeremy Strick, director of the Nasher Sculpture Center. The success of the Nasher, which is widely recognized as one of the country’s premier sculpture gardens, was something of a breakthrough for the city’s psyche. For years Dallas engaged in sibling rivalries with Houston, which has strong cultural roots thanks in part to the de Menil family, and with nearby Fort Worth, which is practically run by the deep-pocketed and socially preeminent—some might say snooty—Bass family. “When the Nasher opened, the art world flocked to Dallas to see it,” recalls Deedie Rose. “It was such an exquisite building and collection. People came and said, ‘This isn’t the Dallas of the assassination.’”

Now, with the new performing arts center and Cowboys Stadium, locals speak of Dallas as the “third coast,” a top-drawer all-American city fast on the heels of New York and L.A.—and a legitimate equal of international business centers, too. “Our competition is Shanghai and Frankfurt,” says Mayor Tom Leppert, standing in front of Pei’s brutalist City Hall. “That’s the mind-set we need to have. And that’s part of what’s important about the performing arts center. It puts us on a world stage.”

Back in the leafy enclave of Preston Hollow, Howard and Cindy Rachofsky sit down for a glass of wine in their dazzling Richard Meier home, which looks like an all-white spaceship landed among the McMansions. The house had been designed as Howard’s bachelor pad—there’s only one bedroom but a spacious gym—and was under construction when he met Cindy in 1993. After the couple married a few years later, they moved into a slightly more livable house nearby, which included rooms for Cindy’s two children. Nonetheless, the Rachofskys are often at the Meier showplace—its official name in the architect’s oeuvre is the Rachofsky House—where they host events such as a recent brunch to celebrate the Cowboys Stadium arts program, a fascinating cultural exchange where the straggly, nicotine-stained artist Lawrence Weiner chatted with Gene Jones in the shadow of her gravity-defying bouffant.

Asked about big hair and the other stereotypes that define Dallas for the rest of the country, the Rachofskys shake their heads. “We always say that if we can just get people down here, we can prove them wrong,” says Cindy.

Howard points to an event that bruised the city’s ego and pushed it to start literally rebuilding its image. In 2001 Seattle aerospace giant Boeing had announced that it was searching for a new corporate headquarters and winnowed the options down to three: Dallas, Denver and Chicago. Despite offering generous tax deals to lure the company and its thousands of jobs, Dallas lost out to Chicago. In the aftermath one theory that emerged was that Chicago had won on the basis of its better quality of life, which included a much wider array of cultural offerings. “It raised awareness that if we want to be relevant, it’s going to take more than just having America’s football team or a special tax break for corporate relocations,” says Howard. “It’s going to take building a city where people want to live.”

In other words, all the big gifts—in the form of art, buildings, parks and bridges—are investments in the city’s civic pride and, so the argument goes, in its economic future. But will it work? Howard Rachofsky is certain of it. “In the next decade Dallas may be considered the China of the States,” he says, “an area whose better days are ahead.”

===

NYTIMESThe New York Times

From left, Jack Lane, director of the Dallas Museum of Art, with its patrons – Deedie Rose, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky and Marguerite Hoffman. They donated about 900 contemporary artworks valued at more than $300 million.


March 28, 2007
Philanthropy

When Serious Collectors Band Together

WHILE established museums are struggling with a drop in the philanthropy that has long helped to build their collections, a recent bequest to the Dallas Museum of Art stands out as a model of generosity.

The catalyst behind this gift — a joint contribution of 900 artworks, valued at more than $300 million and promised by local collectors — is Jack Lane, the museum’s director, who came to town with a history of building community support for the museums he has run.

At the opening in February of “Fast Forward: Contemporary Collections for the Dallas Museum of Art,” the collectors — Marguerite Hoffman, Cindy and Howard Rachofsky and Deedie Rose — addressed American and European art dealers and collectors about their promises to donate their collections, including works they buy in the future, to the museum. All three cited Mr. Lane’s infectious love of art, his leadership and his ties to the contemporary art world for galvanizing their support.

“If a director has a special interest,” Mr. Rachofsky said in an interview, “that’s where the funding gravitates.” Mr. Lane “was the glue,” he said, “that encouraged us to act together.”

Mr. Lane’s involvement with the museum, which is known for its encyclopedic collection, began in the spring of 1998, when he received a call from Ms. Rose, a trustee who was leading a search for a new director. Ms. Rose was familiar with Mr. Lane’s previous directorships of the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, which he had helped transform at pivotal moments in their history. He sensed an opportunity in Dallas. “Some great contemporary art collections were being formed there,” he said.

Still, while sophisticated in their tastes and purchases, the Dallas collectors tended to operate independently. “I’d been collecting on some level since the late 1970s,” Mr. Rachofsky said. “Not necessarily with a strong relationship with the museum, because the Dallas Museum of Art didn’t have a strong contemporary art program.”

Ms. Hoffman agreed, adding that before Mr. Lane’s arrival, the museum “had a fairly scattershot approach to collecting contemporary art” and that “there was no master plan, and there were no funds available. We were missing a whole generation of artists.”

Mr. Lane, whose résumé includes a degree from Williams College, a doctorate in art history from Harvard, an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago and service as a Navy lieutenant in Vietnam, arrived at the museum in February 1999 and began rallying support among Dallas collectors. After acquiring a complete set of multiples by Gerhard Richter, for example, Mr. Lane oversaw a retrospective of the artist’s work, exhibiting 20 of his paintings borrowed from collectors in the area.

Mr. Lane also appealed to the collectors’ pride, encouraging them to examine the history of other encyclopedic museums like the Art Institute of Chicago, whose extraordinary collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings, he said, resulted from bequests made in the late-19th and early-20th centuries, when “those artists were still considered contemporary.” If the Dallas collectors followed that example, he reasoned, the museum might one day “take its place among the great museums.”

Rumblings of a joint gift began on New Year’s Eve 2000, when Ms. Hoffman and her husband, Robert (who died in August), were sharing a bottle of wine with Mr. Rachofsky and his wife, Cindy, at a resort in the Napa Valley. To build support for a capital campaign honoring the museum’s centennial in 2003, the Hoffmans suggested that the two couples issue a challenge: if the campaign goal was met, they would make an irrevocable bequest of both their collections to the museum. The Rachofskys not only agreed, but offered to include their house, which was designed by Richard Meier. The two couples approached Ms. Rose and her husband, Rusty, who added their collection to the challenge.

But by the end of 2004, the campaign had not reached its goal. Mr. Lane said: “We needed to thank our donors and move on. So we decided to throw a party.” Several days before the event, in February 2005, Mr. Lane, who clearly had difficulty accepting defeat, called Ms. Rose, who handles the collection for the couple, and asked her to approach the Hoffmans about making their bequest anyway.

The Hoffmans agreed, provided that the Roses follow their lead. When the Roses agreed, the Hoffmans extended the request to the Rachofskys, who joined in.

“It was a truly transforming moment,” Mr. Lane said. “And it happened overnight.”

Well, not quite. Ms. Hoffman and Ms. Rose both cited Mr. Lane’s 2002 appointment of Bonnie Pitman as deputy director as one of his best decisions and a crucial ingredient in their generosity. “Collectors want their collections to be seen and appreciated,” Ms. Hoffman said.

“When Ms. Pitman first arrived,” Ms. Rose said, “she used to say, ‘You could roll a bowling ball through the concourse, and you wouldn’t hit anybody.’ That’s how few people were in the museum.” Ms. Pitman created programming tailored to increase visitors’ engagement with the art. Under her supervision, attendance has soared 42 percent, with a staggering 53 percent of visitors attending learning programs.

“Between Jack’s credibility in the international art world, and the partnership he and Bonnie have,” Ms. Hoffman said, “he’s been able to take the museum to the next level of distinction.” High attendance numbers, inevitably, brought the good will full circle.

The promised gift by the Hoffman, Rachofsky and Rose families will vastly expand the museum’s contemporary art holdings. “Fast Forward,” a temporary exhibition of 143 of the donated works, and visits to the collectors’ homes reveal a depth in Minimalism, Arte Povera and German painting. The art includes important works by Ellsworth Kelly and Philip Guston, a major 1990 installation featuring a rotating head by Bruce Nauman and a cluster of paintings by Mr. Richter and Sigmar Polke, namely one based on a clipping from a Dallas newspaper.

“I’m green with envy,” said Neal Benezra, the director of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, speaking by phone from his office. “It’s what every museum director dreams of, that his or her collectors will come together in this civic-minded way.”

The Dallas museum’s achievement is especially noteworthy given the slide in philanthropy and skyrocketing art prices, which together have left American museums struggling to keep their collections relevant. “U.S. art museums are highly dependent on the support of local collectors and trustees,” said Sir Nicholas Serota, the director of the Tate in London. To persuade collectors “to put the needs of the community over their own personal needs,” he said, “can be a tough call.”

Under Mr. Lane’s leadership, the Dallas collectors have begun consulting one another before making purchases and acquiring works for the museum jointly. In return for their cooperation, they have acquired top-notch artworks.

“Dealers always have a choice,” Sir Nicholas said. “They can sell major or less important work, depending. If they know a collector’s buying for a museum, then they’re more prepared to sell them a major work.” And collectors’ funds are typically more liquid than a museum’s acquisition funds, giving them an edge when buying works by sought-after artists.

Barbara Gladstone, a Manhattan dealer, said Mr. Lane’s persuasiveness was a great asset. “When he comes into a community,” she said, “he’s able to convince that community of the value of their museum as a part of their cultural life.”

===

FD MAGAZINE

Young collectors to watch: The next Roses, Rachofskys and Hoffmans

Ask the average 30-something what his or her priorities are and inevitably it is clothes, cars, the house, the kids and vacation. But for these young marrieds, the musts include art. It is non-negotiable. Meet four couples who are building their collections — and why

by CHRISTINA GEYER / portraits by MEI-CHUN JAU

Lindsey and Patrick Collins

THE DAY JOBS  Patrick is in oil and gas and is president and CEO of Cortez Resources. The couple owns several businesses together, including one that buys minerals and royalties in Oklahoma.

THE FIRST PIECE  A Ryan McGinness painting. “After seeing the artist’s work a few times,” says Lindsey, “including a great drawing at MoMA, Patrick just picked up the phone and called the gallery one day, and a few weeks later we bought the painting.”

THE MOST VALUABLE PIECES  A video and installation by LA artist Dan Finsel and an armored 1993 Mercedes station wagon, part of a larger project by New York artist Jill Magid

WHY THEY COLLECT  At first, the collecting stemmed from “a general love of contemporary [art]and wanting to be more engaged with it,” Lindsey says, “to live with it and better understand it.” Their collecting has evolved. “We like the work to have a strong biographical quality,” says Patrick. “We want to know the artist is trying to express something personal, rather than just academic or stylistically skillful.”

HOW THEY DECIDE  “We both have to like the artist and the particular work,” says Patrick, “and then we have a long discussion about it before making an offer.” Says Lindsey: “I disagree totally with this answer! Patrick has purchased many works on his own that I ended up hating or loving. … If we had to totally agree on a work then we would never buy anything.”

WHAT DRIVES THEM  “We buy incredible work from artists who we love,” Lindsey says, “and that makes us happy.” Says Patrick: “We are still careful to make sure what we do buy is from respectable dealers and from artists with strong academic backgrounds. … It’s still important to know that the piece will at least hold its value, should you change your mind over the long run.”

FAVORITE ARTISTS  Dan Finsel, Tom Burr, Haroon Mirza and Jill Magid

MOST RECENT PIECE  A bronze work by Tom Burr and a white marble work by Pedro Reyes

THE HOLY GRAIL  “For Patrick,” says Lindsey, “it would be a Morris Louis Veil painting.”

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE SHOULD COLLECT  “You can enjoy plenty of art — visual art, music, theater, literature — without having to ‘own’ it,” Patrick says, “so it takes a very certain type of person to want to take this extra step. It’s important for the world to have collectors of visual art, because that’s what keeps artists making great work.” Says Lindsey: “It is a terrible idea for any young person with limited resources to think they will make any money from buying and selling art. You have to love what you buy from the start, and want to live with it. I guess you could consider it an investment in your mental health — to live with beautiful art.”

 

Lisa and Wayne Moore

THE DAY JOBS  Lisa is the co-founder and designer of the swimwear line Cover. Wayne is an equity investor at a hedge fund.

THE FIRST PIECE  A photograph by Christopher Bucklow

THE MOST VALUABLE PIECE  Roy by Chuck Close. “He is the most well-known artist in our collection,” says Lisa.

WHY THEY COLLECT  “We love the way it adds aspects of beauty, thought and feeling to the space we live in,” says Lisa.

HOW THEY DECIDE  They both have to love a piece before purchasing. “That,” say Lisa, “eliminates many works.”

WHAT DRIVES THEM  “Up until this point,” Lisa says, “it has been purely emotional. But we have started considering investment value in order to be able to change out work in the future.”

OTHER WAYS THEY IMMERSE IN ART  “I love to collaborate with artists for my swimwear line, Cover,” Lisa says. Her most recent collaboration: a swim shirt printed with a work by Richard Phillips.

FAVORITE ARTISTS  Chuck Close, Richard Phillips, Jim Hodges, Takashi Murakami, Kara Walker, Richard Serra, Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha

MOST RECENT PIECE  Marfa artist Leslie Wilkes’ painting, Untitled 12.02, from the Barry Whistler Gallery. “I’ve been told it looks like a kaleidoscope,” says Lisa, “but to me it looks like a colorful insect’s face.”

THE HOLY GRAIL  Lisa: “We haven’t come across it yet.”

WHO ADVISES YOU?  The Moores make most of their art-purchasing decisions on their own, but have purchased pieces recommended by John Runyon, Baker Montgomery and Spencer Young.

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE SHOULD COLLECT  “We are the next generation of arts patrons,” says Lisa. “It also makes life more interesting and provokes thought and conversation.”

 

Meg and Daniel Gotvald

THE DAY JOBS  Daniel is a portfolio manager at a hedge fund. Meg is on the board of the Dallas Contemporary and volunteers for various organizations, including the North Texas Food Bank.

THE FIRST PIECE  A gift from Ethan Couch, one of Daniel’s best friends growing up. The first piece Daniel purchased was a work on paper by Alexander Calder.

THE MOST VALUABLE PIECES  The couple is proud of two works by Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. “He plays with the idea of the real and perceived value of objects,” Daniel says, “and his work also directly addresses human-rights violations in China.” Also of value is a subway drawing by William Anastasi, plus works by artists the couple has a personal relationship with: Jason Willaford, Sedrick Huckaby and Josh Reames included.

WHY THEY COLLECT  Says Daniel: “As Hemingway adeptly stated in A Moveable Feast, quoting Gertrude Stein: ‘You can either buy clothes or buy pictures. It’s that simple. No one who is not very rich can do both. Pay no attention to your clothes and no attention at all to the mode, and buy your clothes for comfort and durability, and you will have the clothes money to buy pictures.’ We would rather buy art than a fancy car or other luxury items — to us it is almost a necessity.”

HOW THEY DECIDE  Love and instinct. The couple has a rule: After first seeing a piece, they consider whether they are still thinking about it a week, a month, even a year later.

WHAT DRIVES THEM  “A visceral reaction to a work and an indelible impression on the brain is the most important aspect,” says Daniel. “We also consider work in a historical context. Investment value only becomes more important once you pass a certain threshold in price and have to weigh relative value between works and what you can acquire.”

THE HOLY GRAIL  A Michael Williams painting

HOW THEY INSTALL  Daniel: “We actually rotate our works around and play around with different works in different spaces. Once it feels right, we stop moving the chairs.”

WHY ANYONE SHOULD COLLECT  “James Rosenquist was in town recently visiting Gallerie Urbane,” Daniel says, “and he said this: ‘An artist provides an abstract mental garden for other people to think, live, work and exist in, so if you fund the arts, you might impart a little humanism into your community.’”

 

Megan and Carson Hall

THE DAY JOBS  Megan is a registered dietitian specializing in pediatrics and Carson is an art adviser and private art dealer.

THE FIRST PIECE  A 1960s Roy Lichtenstein Seascape print

THE MOST VALUABLE PIECE  “All of our art is valuable for different reasons,” Megan says. “There is a story behind each one. The John Holt Smith painting is valuable because Carson commissioned it from the artist for me as a Christmas present. The Kenneth Noland painting is very valuable because we fell in love with it and bought it on the spot. Carson knew it was an opportunity we could not let pass.”

HOW THEY DECIDE  Having conversations about the work, envisioning it in their home and then studying the work.

WHAT DRIVES THEM  “Typically,” says Megan, “a fever to own a specific work, once we see it, starts things off. Next, we utilize Carson’s market knowledge and artist familiarity to decide if this is the right acquisition for our collection.”

FAVORITE ARTISITS  Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Helen Frankenthaler, Kenneth Noland, Willem de Kooning, Adolph Gottlieb, Teresita Fernández

MOST RECENT PIECE  A Kenneth Noland Circle on paper, the third work of Noland’s that the couple owns

THE HOLY GRAIL  For Carson: Mark Rothko’s White Center from 1950. For Megan: an Andy Warhol Diamond Dust Shoes silkscreen.

HOW THEY EDUCATE THE CHILDREN  “We have a 6-year-old and a 2-year-old. We mostly talk to them about the colors, the lines and what they like best about the art. The most delicate pieces are strategically placed. Just like anything that is precious in your home, they learn not to touch.”

WHY YOUNG PEOPLE SHOULD INVEST  “Not only does it enrich your life,” says Megan, “but if done correctly, it can also significantly increase your alternative asset base.”

 ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

On Display in Dallas

Contemporary Masterworks Define a Gallery Guesthouse

Marguerite and Robert Hoffman call the latest addition to their property a guesthouse; their architect Bill Booziotis calls it a garden pavilion. However, with a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art and interiors conceived for the art by the French designer Andrée Putman, the house is more like a small private museum, today’s equivalent of the Frick mansion in New York City and the Isabella Stewart Gardner in Boston.

Certainly, the guesthouse takes a backseat to the 1960s Georgian-style house that dominates a four-acre lot in an elegant Dallas neighborhood. It is one of several smaller structures tucked discreetly into a landscape designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh. From the exterior, the home’s exceptional nature is suggested by the spectacular, undulating wall created at one side by Sol LeWitt.

Robert Hoffman began to collect art approximately 30 years ago with the proceeds from his sale of the National Lampoon, which he founded with two friends in 1969. His wife, Marguerite, holds a master’s degree in art history and has a long involvement with the Dallas art district. So it is no surprise that the couple chose to work with design professionals who had extensive experience with art-related spaces.

Like their friends Cindy and Howard Rachofsky, whose Richard Meier house (see Architectural Digest, April 1997) was recently pledged to the Dallas Museum of Art, the Hoffmans ultimately intend to donate their collection to the museum. With this in mind, the two couples have geared their acquisitions to complement each other’s. The Hoffmans concentrate on modern masters such as Marcel Duchamp and Willem De Kooning, as well as contemporary artists, such as Joseph Beuys, Jasper Johns and Frank Stella, while the Rachofskys, in addition to 1960s Italian Minimalism, acquire works by installation and video artists like Janine Antoni, Charles Ray and Pipilotti Rist.

From the exterior, the Hoffmans’ single-story guesthouse is self-effacing: Façades sheathed in green slate blend with the garden’s giant live and red oaks and pecan trees, as do the teak window frames. The interior is something else. A complex ground plan consists of a majestic 70-foot-long, 22-foot-wide and 21-foot-high gallery serving as an axis intercepted by various rooms. Like this main floor, a below-ground level is arranged for optimal display conditions.

Booziotis is well known in Texas for the spaces he has designed for art, including several museum interiors—most recently the Trammell & Margaret Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas—and residences for numerous private collectors. He says, however, that the Hoffman house is different from anything he has done before. Rather than create static rooms, the architect wanted spaces that would be activated by a person moving through them. He and project architect Jess Galloway combined this idea with the clients’ request for big walls, as much natural, but indirect, light as possible, reinforced vertical and horizontal surfaces that could support heavy objects, and living amenities for guests and entertaining.

Stepping directly into the long gallery from the porticoed entrance, visitors find themselves surrounded by arresting paintings and sculpture, including Franz Kline’s monumental Lehigh (1956), whose size was the deciding factor in favor of building the house. There is indeed a dynamic flow between the long gallery and the spaces around it. Two rooms angle out from either side of the axis: a tall gallery, also used as a formal living room, with a 26-foot-high ceiling, and a lower-ceilinged dining area. At opposite ends of the gallery are the kitchen and an informal sitting area. At an angle to the sitting area are a bedroom and a bath.

Each room is entered at its corners so as to reserve a maximum expanse of wall for hanging. Ceiling heights vary, as do the means of natural illumination, with clerestories adroitly inserted under the gently arched ceilings of the galleries and expansive windows elsewhere. The lower level is likewise divided into gallery-like rooms, with two glazed ceiling panels at the corners of the main one.

Putman found the commission’s challenge particularly pleasurable because the clients were, as she says, “so sympathiques—like two college students.” She was also intrigued by Robert Hoffman’s passion for vanguard figures of the 20th century, including Proust, to whose work a lower study with ample bookshelves is devoted.

Recalling her initial reservations about the living room furniture, Marguerite Hoffman says that Putman suggested she think of its rather firm sofa and chairs as “a shirt that is two sizes too small.” If, however, in this particular room, furnishings were chosen to make you sit up and take notice of the surrounding masterworks, other areas provide plenty of inviting, informal seating. For the designer, working with art is “a lesson in modesty.” Putman believes that “a quiet, pure décor with subdued colors should allow you to forget everything else in the room.”

When it came to placing the art, much of which the Hoffmans had never installed because of space restrictions, the couple enlisted the advice of a friend or two. Marguerite Hoffman remembers their early agreement to rule out a priori decisions and to work instead by trial and error. The method paid off. Artworks are shown to their best advantage in excellent space and light conditions; additionally, delightful surprises abound, such as an exquisite Cy Twombly sculpture positioned in a narrow corridor overlooking the garden and a Conceptual piece by Wolfgang Laib hidden in a powder room.

Art became a factor outside as well as in with the acquisition of an adjacent lot. The property’s enlargement changed the original garden project from a landscaped passageway between the main house and guesthouse into something quite different. The need for an attractive boundary wall at one side that would also be a sound barrier for traffic noise brought to mind the concrete-block constructions that Sol LeWitt had begun to show in 1986. Nothing the artist had done until then, however, prepared the Hoffmans and their crew for what Van Valkenburgh calls the “strip of ribbon candy” LeWitt proposed. The landscape architect remembers his first view of a maquette for the magnificent, exploded Jeffersonian structure as “one of the great moments of the project.” With the LeWitt at one side and a concrete wall at the other, Van Valkenburgh now saw the garden as a planted void between the two. “It was no longer about filling in,” he realized, “but rather about opening up as much space as possible.”

Into this space, Van Valkenburgh strewed narrow bluestone pathways that are elevated slightly above ground. No single path leads directly from one place to another, a random quality that evokes the wall as well. Surprisingly, LeWitt’s 560-foot, meandering brick structure does not dominate the property. The wall embraces rather than encloses, moving sensuously around trees, framing them and giving a feeling of depth beyond the boundary line.

Nothing in the appearance of LeWitt’s whimsical construction reveals the complex steel infrastructure that was needed to maintain a consistent height of 11 feet despite the base’s fluctuations (in response to the landscape and to drainage requirements). As in the case of the wall’s deceptive simplicity, the guesthouse belies a complex agenda. The Hoffmans belong to a long history of collectors who made art display a priority in their homes. As demonstrated when such houses are made public, these lived-in environments animate the art in ways rarely possible in an institutional setting.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: